LED Bulb Question

9
Posted 3rd MayEdited by:"Toptrumpet"
Afternoon fellow Hukkers,
I’ve been tasked with buying 4 new outdoor porch lights which will be open to the elements (although undercover). The units are available to buy from a few different suppliers and each supplier seems to be giving different light bulb information.
Outdoor Light
I believe (from the manufacturers listing above) that the units take 2x E27 40W traditional pear shaped light bulbs, but some suppliers state 2 x 7W E27 LED bulbs.
I really need as bright a bulbs as possible and Cool White.
What I’m looking to find out is - if I buy LED bulbs, can I buy higher than 7W? Could I buy (in theory) any wattage LED bulbs as long as they’re under 40W each? or will the units blow?
I have tried google, and think 40w is equivalent to a 7W led, but not found anything definitive regarding using a brighter bulb.
Thanks for bearing with me, and any help appreciated.
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9 Comments
I don't know about outdoor blubs
but 7w is more like 80w for an indoor one despite what it might say on the box.
£1.52 for a 20w white.

#Aliexpress £0.85 36%OFF | LED Bulb Lamps E27 E14 3W 6W 9W 12W 15W 18W 20W AC 220V 230V 240V Light Bulbs Real Power Spotlight Lampada LED Bombillas
a.aliexpress.com/_B1…nVm

If you have the means to buy on aliexpress.
If the light unit takes standard incandescent bulbs and states the maximum wattage you can use any led bulb up to the same wattage ie. 40W incandescent or 40w LED (assuming you can fit such a big LED bulb inside the light unit).
As I've always understood it the maximum wattage was due to heat given off affecting the lamp/shade, led bulbs dont get hot so any wattage will work for led bulbs, although the wattage between the 2 types is not a direct comparrison 40625167-yn4ib.jpg
Edited by: "ding" 3rd May
LEDs are much more heat sensitive and won't tolerate anything like the temperatures an incandescent can stand. A fitting designed for a 40W incandescent won't have sufficient airflow or heatsinking to cool a 40W LED.

That's why you won't find an equivalent chart - it doesn't really depend on the wattage of the incandescent the fitting will take.

If you want maximum brightness then don't go down the bulb route but buy a fitting designed around an LED
You won't find a 40w E27 so you can put in any LED E27 and it'll work safely. Along with wattage, you'll find the lumens on the specs - this is the true measurement of brightness. Two 10W LED E27 lamps can have different brightness, depending on quality. Cool white lamps are always a bit brighter than other colours at the same wattage. I buy value lamps from CPC Farnell. For better quality you can go Philips/Sylvania or other brands. You want a colour temp over 4000k for cool white.
Sam22303/05/2020 17:30

You won't find a 40w E27 so you can put in any LED E27 and it'll work …You won't find a 40w E27 so you can put in any LED E27 and it'll work safely. Along with wattage, you'll find the lumens on the specs - this is the true measurement of brightness. Two 10W LED E27 lamps can have different brightness, depending on quality. Cool white lamps are always a bit brighter than other colours at the same wattage. I buy value lamps from CPC Farnell. For better quality you can go Philips/Sylvania or other brands. You want a colour temp over 4000k for cool white.


4000k is more of a neutral white. Cool white typically starts at around 5500-6000k, although as it's a perceptual thing it does depend on context and what you're used to
Thanks Guys for all your help, I opted for 11w Phillips LED’s in the end as they were reduced from about £10 each to £2.19, and I didn’t see the point in spending so much more for a few wattage higher.40735956-8ZQnb.jpg
40735956-vAKae.jpg
Edited by: "Toptrumpet" 13th May
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