Expired

Led light bulbs. Never used them, what do I need to know?

15
Found 20th Sep 2017Edited by:"LeahsMintytoutou"
Hey guys and gals. Ive never used LED lightbubs but I've read they save on electric quite abit so I want to switch to them.I've done a quick google search and the prices seem to vary quite abit. I seems strange to spend £10 on one lightbulb as I'm used to buying cheapo standard bulbs. I know nothing about LEDs so I can't make a decision on where to buy them from. I'd like to get them as cheap as possible (obviously) but if that means they are going to break quickly I'll pay more if it's worth while. I've had light bulbs break after 1 week of being in use. They seem to go black inside too then other times they'll last months.

So what I'd like to know is:
-What's your experience with using them since you stopped using standard bulbs?
-where should I look at getting them from?
-What kind of prices should I expect to pay?
-How long do they last
-Do they give off horrible sharp bright white light?
-how much would I expect to save over a period of time?
I have 5 rooms I want them in plus my living room but my living room is a chandelier light with thin screw in fittings. Would I have to change the actual light fitting?

and anything else anyone has to add or advise I'd be happy to hear,
thanks fellow hukders
Community Updates
Ask
15 Comments
Nondomestic building services engineer here

Well worth it. They last long and the quality of light is now not a problem. Go for GE bulbs but honestly all brands are OK.

-What's your experience with using them since you stopped using standard bulbs?

Most of the house is LED - once we started buying soft glow bulbs all good.

-where should I look at getting them from?
Honestly anywhere I use hot uk deals and chinese sites like gearbest and ali express.

-What kind of prices should I expect to pay?

around a tenner a bulb but can be less depends on what it does. Some bulbs are wifi controllable (IKEA and phillips are the two market leaders here)

-How long do they last

Ages. Think around ten years.

-Do they give off horrible sharp bright white light?

The early ones did but you can buy softer output now. Look for warm or soft glow bulbs (lower colour temperature)

-how much would I expect to save over a period of time?

In the long term about a fiver a room or so every ten years. The thing to understand though is old incandescent bulbs are no longer available on the market so you have to do LED in the long term.

I have 5 rooms I want them in plus my living room but my living room is a chandelier light with thin screw in fittings. Would I have to change the actual light fitting?
alexmel has given you solid advice - agree with everything said.

I'm 100% LED and have noticed a reduction in my electricty use.

I use "warm white" for living rooms and bedrooms but like "cool white" for the kitchen and bathrooms.

I bought some of mine at Home Bargains for £1 a time, some from Screwfix (boxes of 5x 9W at £7.99) - the rest I bought from China via ebay (approx £1-£1.50 a piece). Only need to pay £10/bulb if you want smart ones which you can control remotely.

They come in all shapes/sizes - with all fitting types - so no you won't need to replace your chandelier. I find a 9W LED is good enough for a large room and I use multiple 3-5W bulbs in living rooms for a more subdued lighting.

As to savings - if you replace a standard 100W bulb with say a 9W LED and use that buld on average 6 hours per day, over the year you will save about £27/year (per bulb!).
@alexmel
(wrote this in reply to you earlier but just realised I didn't quote you so you won't know I said Thankyou for all your info)

Wow Thankyou for that info, very informative, really appreciate that

I'm still using the cheapo ones, I still see them in homebargains (for now).
really surprised they can last 10 years! I wasn't expecting that long at all so that's great!

I wouldn't be interested In Wifi controlled ones, I don't think anyway.
So the chandelier, would I have to change it? I'm in a rented house so I don't want to pay to change fittings.

Thanks for your advice, really appreciate it

ps another person has answered the chandelier question now
Edited by: "LeahsMintytoutou" 20th Sep 2017
Van197313 m ago

alexmel has given you solid advice - agree with everything said.I'm 100% …alexmel has given you solid advice - agree with everything said.I'm 100% LED and have noticed a reduction in my electricty use. I use "warm white" for living rooms and bedrooms but like "cool white" for the kitchen and bathrooms.I bought some of mine at Home Bargains for £1 a time, some from Screwfix (boxes of 5x 9W at £7.99) - the rest I bought from China via ebay (approx £1-£1.50 a piece). Only need to pay £10/bulb if you want smart ones which you can control remotely.They come in all shapes/sizes - with all fitting types - so no you won't need to replace your chandelier. I find a 9W LED is good enough for a large room and I use multiple 3-5W bulbs in living rooms for a more subdued lighting.As to savings - if you replace a standard 100W bulb with say a 9W LED and use that buld on average 6 hours per day, over the year you will save about £27/year (per bulb!).


Thankyou to you too, answered some more of my questions. I'm excited to go to home bargains now and get some bulbs! lol I'm easily pleased
i like my lighting the way you described too, bright in kitchen n bathroom.I'm sure my kitchen light wiring is dodgy. I'll put a cheap led one in it and if it blows I'll get my landlord in.
My my daughter is terrible at leaving lights on. I've just gone upstairs and her big light was on, landing light, kitchen light and bathroom light! So with this switch at least I won't be feeling the pounds burning in my pocket. When she's old enough to move out I'm going round to her house and I'm going to leave all the lights on and leave clothes and rubbish on her floor, Payback lol
LeahsMintytoutou11 m ago

Thankyou to you too, answered some more of my questions. I'm excited to go …Thankyou to you too, answered some more of my questions. I'm excited to go to home bargains now and get some bulbs! lol I'm easily pleased i like my lighting the way you described too, bright in kitchen n bathroom.I'm sure my kitchen light wiring is dodgy. I'll put a cheap led one in it and if it blows I'll get my landlord in. My my daughter is terrible at leaving lights on. I've just gone upstairs and her big light was on, landing light, kitchen light and bathroom light! So with this switch at least I won't be feeling the pounds burning in my pocket. When she's old enough to move out I'm going round to her house and I'm going to leave all the lights on and leave clothes and rubbish on her floor, Payback lol


Make a note of the fittings type you need before you go. There is a sketch on this link which details the names/types which.co.uk/rev…ulb

The most common type is BC22 - bayonet fitting (push in and twist), then ES27 (screw fitting, 27 is the diameter in mm) - your chandelier may be smaller (e.g. ES14) if it has multiple bulbs. Spotlights are generally GU10.

Worth shopping around as last time I was in Home Bargains their bulbs looked to be a bot dearer than what I paid.
Van197313 m ago

Make a note of the fittings type you need before you go. There is a …Make a note of the fittings type you need before you go. There is a sketch on this link which details the names/types http://www.which.co.uk/reviews/light-bulbs/article/five-tips-for-choosing-the-right-light-bulbThe most common type is BC22 - bayonet fitting (push in and twist), then ES27 (screw fitting, 27 is the diameter in mm) - your chandelier may be smaller (e.g. ES14) if it has multiple bulbs. Spotlights are generally GU10.Worth shopping around as last time I was in Home Bargains their bulbs looked to be a bot dearer than what I paid.


Thanks Its worth a look to see if they have cheap ones. If not I'll just get a couple for now. Yeah my chandelier is the thin screw in ones(x5) I hate having 5 bulbs in it though as it's just too bright.
The rest are bayonet. Thanks again for your help
I have them in the kitchen and they are great. low energy consumption but bright light. they are actually quite warm lighting even though bright enough. they last ages. They tend to be expensive compared to normal bulbs but they are worth the money as they last much longer and use less energy. I buy them when they are on sale so great value for money
I purchased the standard bayonet fitting ones from poundland rated at 5 watts, they have been in over a year now and all work as should, not bad as it was only £9 for every room in the house and are much better and brighter than the 11 watt mercury filled energy bulbs they replaced.
Change the most frequently used rooms first.
As winter is coming and the cost of LED's is now so cheap you'd be a fool not to replace all the standard fitting and wattage lights you have.


Just remember warm white for rooms you want to relax in. Cool white for office space, bathrooms and possibly kitchen.
Try asda, they've been selling them off over the last few months ( might be a bit late now ). I got a few @ £1 each and a remote on for £2.50.
Darzen2 m ago

Try asda, they've been selling them off over the last few months ( might …Try asda, they've been selling them off over the last few months ( might be a bit late now ). I got a few @ £1 each and a remote on for £2.50.


Thanks I'll try and get there too
Van19738 h, 26 m ago

Make a note of the fittings type you need before you go. There is a …Make a note of the fittings type you need before you go. There is a sketch on this link which details the names/types http://www.which.co.uk/reviews/light-bulbs/article/five-tips-for-choosing-the-right-light-bulbThe most common type is BC22 - bayonet fitting (push in and twist), then ES27 (screw fitting, 27 is the diameter in mm) - your chandelier may be smaller (e.g. ES14) if it has multiple bulbs. Spotlights are generally GU10.Worth shopping around as last time I was in Home Bargains their bulbs looked to be a bot dearer than what I paid.


Got some from home bargains! they were only £1.29 each and £1.59! So Thankyou
I replaced 18 50w halogens for equiv. leds and apart from the increased quality of the light, i calculated it saved about £80 quid a year in electricity. I fully expect that some of the later bulbs will outlast me!
Another thumbs up for the Screwfix ones when on offer.
LED all the way. Yes you can buy cheap non LED bulbs but in most modern application the bulbs blows because they get too hot, unlike LEDs, especially the GU10s and the ones that have two little prongs that are no bigger than your thumb nail sorry i cannot remember the model number.
I've replaced all my bulbs with leds, In the last year I've only had one bulb fail and that was a screw type in a lamp.

You can get them in various different colour temperatures, I go for 6000k as that's just about the purest white. Very crisp. I usually just buy the cheapest on Ebay.
Post a comment
Avatar
@
    Text

    Top Discussions

    Top Discussions

    Top Merchants