Legal - Family court question?

11
Found 27th May
Hi
Can a solicitor represent you in Family Court or does it have to be a Barrister?
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ccnp1 h, 11 m ago

A JP and offering to hand out advice to strangers?




If I have the knowledge why shouldn’t I offer to help someone on here? It’s only the same as a plumber offering to help someone on here choose a new boiler or how to fix a leaky tap. I don’t know what the big deal is??
Edited by: "Toptrumpet" 27th May
11 Comments
I don't see why it would have to be a barrister, only that they maybe a bit more clued up on things, and charge you a small fortune for their service.
Being a Magistrate in the family Court, if you want any help pm me
A solicitor can represent you in a family court but may feel a barrister would be more appropriate depending on the circumstances. In some cases you can even represent yourself if you feel confident enough.
Anyone can represent you, or you can represent yourself, question is whos going to be more clued up on it, and more to the point be in a best position to put your Case across and understand the legal matters and Court proceedures.
Edited by: "zirk" 27th May
Toptrumpet2 h, 25 m ago

Being a Magistrate in the family Court, if you want any help pm me


Seriously? A JP and offering to hand out advice to strangers?

Or more likely, a wannabe JP
ccnp1 h, 11 m ago

A JP and offering to hand out advice to strangers?




If I have the knowledge why shouldn’t I offer to help someone on here? It’s only the same as a plumber offering to help someone on here choose a new boiler or how to fix a leaky tap. I don’t know what the big deal is??
Edited by: "Toptrumpet" 27th May
Either a solicitor or barrister can represent you in a family court . Usually you would go to a solicitor first then, depending how the case progresses, the solicitor may decide that you need a barrister and would find one suitable for your case.

If you don't want to go down this (very costly) route you can either represent yourself or have a "McKenzie Friend" to speak on you behalf. This could be someone who you feel could put your case forward without any of the emotional baggage that you may find difficult to put aside. They don't have to have a legal background but it obviously would help, usually a close family member is not allowed. Any McKenzie Friend has to be approved by the court before the hearing.

More people are representing themselves in court these days because of the cut backs to legal aid, but you are still expected to fill in all the legal forms and meet the court's timetable in filing documents etc. It's worth while swotting up, before you embark on self representing, all the procedures you will need to meet.

Most family law solicitors will offer free, or low cost 30 or 40 min appointments to go through all your options.
Edited by: "booky" 27th May
I used a solicitor, who was great. And a lot better than the ex’s barrister, including the cost!
Toptrumpet15 h, 34 m ago

If I have the knowledge why shouldn’t I offer to help someone on here? I …If I have the knowledge why shouldn’t I offer to help someone on here? It’s only the same as a plumber offering to help someone on here choose a new boiler or how to fix a leaky tap. I don’t know what the big deal is??


Still reckon you are a JP? And not just a JP but a specialist Magistrate? Go and have a chat with the chief clerk and tell them what's going on. They will explain that the approach is 'ill advised' (to put it politely). You were warned not to dispense public advice when appointed.

(BTW, they will ask how often and how long this has been going on. If this has been common practise, it is very likely that a letter from the Lord Chancellor will arrive shortly relieving the burden of duties.)
Edited by: "ccnp" 28th May
ccnp2 h, 51 m ago

Still reckon you are a JP? And not just a JP but a specialist Magistrate? …Still reckon you are a JP? And not just a JP but a specialist Magistrate? Go and have a chat with the chief clerk and tell them what's going on. They will explain that the approach is 'ill advised' (to put it politely). You were warned not to dispense public advice when appointed. (BTW, they will ask how often and how long this has been going on. If this has been common practise, it is very likely that a letter from the Lord Chancellor will arrive shortly relieving the burden of duties.)


The advice toptrumpet gave was neither case specific nor personalised. If someone can answer what was basically a simple question because they have experience in that specific field, that's absolutely fine on a public forum.

My advice was slightly more detailed, but again neither case specfic nor personalised. I also have experience in the field but you still target toptrumpet. Just to add to your knowledge should the op actually have chance to speak to the chief clerk in a magistrates court or a county court officer they would be given the same advice both tops and I have posted on here.
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