LIDL bottom of supermarkets in recyclable packaging

15
Found 19th JulEdited by:"davewave"
Up to a third of plastic packaging used in supermarkets is either difficult to recycle or not recyclable at all, a consumer group has said.

Consumer group Which? said that of 27 own-brand items at 10 big supermarkets, Lidl had the lowest proportion of easily recyclable packaging.

However Lidl said the survey did not represent the shop's product range.

Which? found 29% of packaging is likely to go to landfill and wants simple recycling labels to be made compulsory.

According to the report, 71% of packaging at Lidl was widely recyclable compared to 73% at Iceland, 75% at Sainsbury's and 81% in Morrisons.

Some products, such as easy peel oranges, were packaged in non-recyclable material regardless of the supermarket they came from.

However, a chocolate cake brought at Morrisons came with a widely recyclable box while a similar product at Lidl was made up of a non-recyclable film within a widely recyclable box with a non-recyclable window.
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@davewave
4 supermarkets, are there not percentages for Tesco, Asda, Waitrose Aldi, Co-op?
Are the percentages calculated by number of product lines, weight of recyclables materials, weight of goods sold, or what?
A Which? investigation has found big differences in how much packaging is recyclable at different supermarkets. We ordered a basket of 27 of the most popular own-brand groceries from 10 of the UK’s biggest supermarket chains. We unwrapped them, weighed them and brought in an expert to help sort and analyse it all. We found that between 71% and 81% of the total packaging (by weight) was widely recyclable at kerbside – with Morrisons the best on this measure and Lidl the worst.

Read more: which.co.uk/new…ds/ - Which?

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Percentages are of the total packaging weight for each supermarket, without the food. We chose items from each supermarket’s standard own-brand range and were specified by weight and/or size. Where it wasn’t possible to select an exact weight or size match, we chose the closest available. If an item wasn’t available in the standard range, we substituted it with the equivalent item in the premium range where available. If an item wasn’t available in one supermarket, it was removed for the other supermarkets.



We found key differences in some of the packaging used.

For example:

Seedless grapes: While most of the seedless white grapes came in widely recyclable tubs with a non-recyclable film lid, those from Ocado, Waitrose and M&S came in a recyclable tub covered with an all-over non-recyclable plastic wrapper.

Apples: Ocado packaged its apples in bubble wrap (which is recyclable at collection points but not at kerbside) while M&S and Waitrose packaged their apples in a type of plastic film which is also recyclable at collection points – although they both wrongly labelled it as non-recyclable. The other seven supermarkets wrapped their apples in non-recyclable plastic film, with Lidl and Tesco also including a widely-recyclable card tray for their apples as well.

Beef mince: Aldi, Iceland and Lidl all packaged their beef mince in black plastic which is not usually recyclable. Waitrose packaged its beef mince in a non-recyclable plastic wrapper. The other six supermarkets all used widely-recyclable clear plastic trays with non-recyclable plastic film lids.

Lamb chops: Iceland, Lidl and M&S all packaged their lamb chops in hard to recycle black plastic trays, whereas the other seven supermarkets all used widely-recyclable clear plastic trays which non-recyclable film lids or coverings.

Salmon fillets: Ocado and Tesco’s salmon fillets came in hard-to-recycle black plastic trays. Iceland’s salmon, which was different as it was frozen rather than fresh, came in a non-recyclable plastic pouch in a widely-recyclable cardboard box. The remaining seven supermarkets all used widely-recyclable clear or blue plastic trays with non-recyclable plastic coverings.

Some groceries had non-recyclable packaging whichever supermarket they came from. All the packaged easy peelers, for example, came in orange nets with plastic labels which are not just unrecyclable – they can also cause huge issues if they wrongly end up in a recycling sorting plant by risking getting caught in the machinery and causing a breakdown. We were surprised to find huge inconsistencies in the labelling of recycling information.

Different systems of labelling were used. Some items weren’t labelled at all. Others were incorrectly labelled and still more had labels which were only visible once the food was unwrapped – not helpful to those trying to make a considered choice in the supermarket aisle.

Why do supermarkets use plastic? While the idea of plastic-free food shopping sounds appealing, there are complex reasons behind the use of plastic packaging in supermarkets. Plastic food packaging serves a number of important purposes – it helps protect food from damage, it makes food more visually appealing for consumers and it helps it last longer. And these are important. Food has a significantly higher carbon footprint than the packaging it comes in. Experts say food waste generally produces three times as much carbon as packaging waste. All the major supermarkets in the UK have pledged to do more to reduce the amount of non-recyclable plastic packaging they use. But Which? is calling on government and manufacturers to simplify and clarify current recycling labels and make recycling labelling compulsory on all plastic packaging, so that consumers know what can and can’t be recycled, and how.

Read more: which.co.uk/new…ds/ - Which?
"A spokesperson for Lidl said the "small sample" used in the report was not representative of the shop's product range."


brings to mind the same sort of survey as 99% of women said they had clearer skin, small print at the bottom of the advert of the 10 people surveyed
Edited by: "eslick" 19th Jul
eslick4 m ago

"A spokesperson for Lidl said the "small sample" used in the report was …"A spokesperson for Lidl said the "small sample" used in the report was not representative of the shop's product range." brings to mind the same sort of survey as 99% of women said they had clearer skin, small print at the bottom of the advert of the 10 people surveyed


27 popular own brand products, do Lidl have such a vast range of beef mince, grapes, milk etc...ones with vastly better recyclable packaging - poor response, they simply couldn't give a fig.
eslick13 m ago

"A spokesperson for Lidl said the "small sample" used in the report was …"A spokesperson for Lidl said the "small sample" used in the report was not representative of the shop's product range." brings to mind the same sort of survey as 99% of women said they had clearer skin, small print at the bottom of the advert of the 10 people surveyed

The spokesperson had a total failure as a person and is utterly incompetent, s/he did immediately propose which items would be a fair sample from Lidl and why; or that s/he return to Which at a later date with such details; or publish this as notice in Lidl' s shop later on or on their web sites with numerical analysis.

These spokespeople and environmental claims from corporate companies are all dreams and wishes; the overwhelming evidence is that they have claims but no actual numerical analysis nor any actual evidence for consumers to use on their corporate web sites.
Edited by: "splender" 19th Jul
splender1 m ago

The spokesperson had a total failure as a person and is utterly …The spokesperson had a total failure as a person and is utterly incompetent, s/he did immediately propose which items would be a fair sample from Lidl and why; or that s/he return to Which at a later date with such details; or publish this as notice in Lidl' s shop later on or on their web sites with numerical analysis



you dont know that is the case at all, I know we like to say just anything on here but thats just made up
eslick4 m ago

you dont know that is the case at all, I know we like to say just anything …you dont know that is the case at all, I know we like to say just anything on here but thats just made up



there is a total absence of any evidence on their web site on environmental claims versus actual achievements
Edited by: "splender" 19th Jul
davewave14 m ago

27 popular own brand products, do Lidl have such a vast range of beef …27 popular own brand products, do Lidl have such a vast range of beef mince, grapes, milk etc...ones with vastly better recyclable packaging - poor response, they simply couldn't give a fig.


we can only hope that they increase their recycling rates on the products in the survey and beyond, its obviously possible to do better and reality is we once never needed the packaging we have now.

Who would know that giving shoppers fruit and veg in paper bags was possible as morrisons I think it is announced the other week. Much of what we have now is due to shops wanting to sell us more rather than offer items loose like we used to do. Its in many of our life times that you went and bought even butter from a block sold in a shop rather than prepacked, how many products even in supermarkets can you no longer by loose.

Look at how many shops now offer paper bags instead of plastic, change only happens if its forced on companies and maybe its time it was on other packaging. Though the worry is still other countries and how much recycling we just ship away and not worry where its going to.
davewave49 m ago

A Which? investigation has found big differences in how much packaging is …A Which? investigation has found big differences in how much packaging is recyclable at different supermarkets. We ordered a basket of 27 of the most popular own-brand groceries from 10 of the UK’s biggest supermarket chains. We unwrapped them, weighed them and brought in an expert to help sort and analyse it all. We found that between 71% and 81% of the total packaging (by weight) was widely recyclable at kerbside – with Morrisons the best on this measure and Lidl the worst. Read more: https://www.which.co.uk/news/2018/07/up-to-29-of-supermarket-packaging-is-not-recyclable-which-finds/ - Which?[Image] Percentages are of the total packaging weight for each supermarket, without the food. We chose items from each supermarket’s standard own-brand range and were specified by weight and/or size. Where it wasn’t possible to select an exact weight or size match, we chose the closest available. If an item wasn’t available in the standard range, we substituted it with the equivalent item in the premium range where available. If an item wasn’t available in one supermarket, it was removed for the other supermarkets. We found key differences in some of the packaging used. For example: Seedless grapes: While most of the seedless white grapes came in widely recyclable tubs with a non-recyclable film lid, those from Ocado, Waitrose and M&S came in a recyclable tub covered with an all-over non-recyclable plastic wrapper. Apples: Ocado packaged its apples in bubble wrap (which is recyclable at collection points but not at kerbside) while M&S and Waitrose packaged their apples in a type of plastic film which is also recyclable at collection points – although they both wrongly labelled it as non-recyclable. The other seven supermarkets wrapped their apples in non-recyclable plastic film, with Lidl and Tesco also including a widely-recyclable card tray for their apples as well. Beef mince: Aldi, Iceland and Lidl all packaged their beef mince in black plastic which is not usually recyclable. Waitrose packaged its beef mince in a non-recyclable plastic wrapper. The other six supermarkets all used widely-recyclable clear plastic trays with non-recyclable plastic film lids. Lamb chops: Iceland, Lidl and M&S all packaged their lamb chops in hard to recycle black plastic trays, whereas the other seven supermarkets all used widely-recyclable clear plastic trays which non-recyclable film lids or coverings. Salmon fillets: Ocado and Tesco’s salmon fillets came in hard-to-recycle black plastic trays. Iceland’s salmon, which was different as it was frozen rather than fresh, came in a non-recyclable plastic pouch in a widely-recyclable cardboard box. The remaining seven supermarkets all used widely-recyclable clear or blue plastic trays with non-recyclable plastic coverings. Some groceries had non-recyclable packaging whichever supermarket they came from. All the packaged easy peelers, for example, came in orange nets with plastic labels which are not just unrecyclable – they can also cause huge issues if they wrongly end up in a recycling sorting plant by risking getting caught in the machinery and causing a breakdown. We were surprised to find huge inconsistencies in the labelling of recycling information. Different systems of labelling were used. Some items weren’t labelled at all. Others were incorrectly labelled and still more had labels which were only visible once the food was unwrapped – not helpful to those trying to make a considered choice in the supermarket aisle. Why do supermarkets use plastic? While the idea of plastic-free food shopping sounds appealing, there are complex reasons behind the use of plastic packaging in supermarkets. Plastic food packaging serves a number of important purposes – it helps protect food from damage, it makes food more visually appealing for consumers and it helps it last longer. And these are important. Food has a significantly higher carbon footprint than the packaging it comes in. Experts say food waste generally produces three times as much carbon as packaging waste. All the major supermarkets in the UK have pledged to do more to reduce the amount of non-recyclable plastic packaging they use. But Which? is calling on government and manufacturers to simplify and clarify current recycling labels and make recycling labelling compulsory on all plastic packaging, so that consumers know what can and can’t be recycled, and how. Read more: https://www.which.co.uk/news/2018/07/up-to-29-of-supermarket-packaging-is-not-recyclable-which-finds/ - Which?



A decent response, thanks.

The Which survey is a starter for ten. I would have preferred a joined up end-to-end survey.

The percentages are only truly meaningful to environmental protection when this survey is joined up with what consumers actually do with these recyclables in this sample. Say, Asda and Morrison are the best but what do their (sample) customers actually do with these recyclables? Likewise for Lidl and Iceland, they are the worst.

The maths is that the range between the best and the worst is 10%. A swing of 5% of throw-aways by their actual customer bases could neutralise this difference.
eslick30 m ago

we can only hope that they increase their recycling rates on the products …we can only hope that they increase their recycling rates on the products in the survey and beyond, its obviously possible to do better and reality is we once never needed the packaging we have now. Who would know that giving shoppers fruit and veg in paper bags was possible as morrisons I think it is announced the other week. Much of what we have now is due to shops wanting to sell us more rather than offer items loose like we used to do. Its in many of our life times that you went and bought even butter from a block sold in a shop rather than prepacked, how many products even in supermarkets can you no longer by loose.Look at how many shops now offer paper bags instead of plastic, change only happens if its forced on companies and maybe its time it was on other packaging. Though the worry is still other countries and how much recycling we just ship away and not worry where its going to.



We shall shop more at Morrisons on the way home from September.
Until this country gets a proper recycling system sorted out all plastic waste should go to landfill. Its because of our bad system that a lot gets shipped abroad and ends up in the oceans.
123thisisme1 h, 15 m ago

Until this country gets a proper recycling system sorted out all plastic …Until this country gets a proper recycling system sorted out all plastic waste should go to landfill. Its because of our bad system that a lot gets shipped abroad and ends up in the oceans.


Some plastic is non recyclable, most of it is low value, global issue.
davewave2 h, 21 m ago

Some plastic is non recyclable, most of it is low value, global issue.


Yup, send it to landfill.
I winter how thick the brown envelope was for which to shit over lidl once again, when everyone knows they are the superior supermarket in every way.
Edited by: "eset12345" 21st Jul
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