Low maintenance smooth masonry paint

12
Posted 7th Jun
I currently have smooth masonry surround wall area around the front door. It is painted in yellow and over the years have deteriorated. It had ivy grown over it so I got that removed and now there are marks all over that section from where the ivy had taken hold.

I plan to get someone round to sand down the wall and paint it again. However, I am looking for a low maintenance colour as yellow will start to look dirty and old again pretty soon.

I am thinking grey? Anyone got any advice on what smooth masonry colour is low maintenance and looks OK?

I was also thinking if there is something better than smooth masonry for the wall so that if the ivy grows over it again, it won't leave such bad marks, like brick but removing the masonry and putting up a brick section is not feasible. Maybe cladding??
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Why not get rid of the ivy rather than change your house to accomodate it?
Pandamansays07/06/2020 11:36

Why not get rid of the ivy rather than change your house to accomodate it?


the ivy has been removed already but it comes over from the neighbour's side so there is no guarantee it won't come over again. it is a tenanted property so i can not always rely on the tenants to remove the ivy as soon as it comes over. therefore it is very likely that the ivy will grow over the wall again in future and will have to be removed.
Darker grey is probably your best bet but I would use an oil based masonry paint instead of a water based. Idk if ivy leaves any oily stains or whatever but a water based masonry might struggle to cover over it as water+oily/greasy stains = no.
It is more expensive to buy I think but it's better than having to buy twice after coating and realising it's not covering.
Cloeeez07/06/2020 11:42

Darker grey is probably your best bet but I would use an oil based …Darker grey is probably your best bet but I would use an oil based masonry paint instead of a water based. Idk if ivy leaves any oily stains or whatever but a water based masonry might struggle to cover over it as water+oily/greasy stains = no.It is more expensive to buy I think but it's better than having to buy twice after coating and realising it's not covering.


yeah, i like the dark grey colour as it looks modern and it doesn't look worn quickly like the light masonry colour like yellow and white. the existing wall area would need to be sanded down i think to remove the existing flaking paint and any remants of the ivy. however, if they get back to the concrete wall, the paint won't have any difficulty taking hold even if it is water based?

good advice about oil based paint as i like them better than water based paint in general. they give a glossier finish so that may also discourage the ivy from taking hold in future as it is harder to hang on to something that is shiny and glossy than something that is rougher.

my understanding is that oil based paint also lasts longer and is more durable, is that correct?
Sand down the walls lol, Don't think anyone will be doing that.
It will want stabilising again if has ivy etc all over it.
Edited by: "fearona" 7th Jun
The paint should be fine covering over anything but I'd expect through sanding or wire brushing you won't get it all off. Paint seeps into brickwork/plaster/masonry cast etc as that stuff is porous. That's the whole point of paint. It penerates into the surface instead of sticking onto it like a glue.

The ivy will probably still take hold as that's just what ivy does it's destructive lol. It goes wherever it wants to unless you put up a fence type thing where it's growing over to try and entice it to wrap around the fence rather than onto your building. Then you could just remove the cheap fence and rinse and repeat so it doesn't damage your actual building.

Water based masonry can give oil based a run for its money now as the industry has been focusing more on creating stronger water based paints due to government regulations on oil/spirit based.
Both of them have pros and cons.
However I would never paint oil based white because it will yellow very quickly but since you're wanting dark grey yellowing isn't a problem.
And like I said, water + grease = no coverage. Whether inside or outside those rules still apply.
Like I know some trees are very sappy which is very greasy so if that was covering your building you would have to use an oil based to cover the sap. Idk if ivy is because I've never touched any lol.
Edited by: "Cloeeez" 7th Jun
Don't go for grey if you want something long lasting. It may be fashionable now but tastes will swing against it at some point. Go for something with a bit of colour in.

Which colour depends on the local building materials but pick something that's widely used on houses of all different ages locally.
EndlessWaves07/06/2020 12:32

Don't go for grey if you want something long lasting. It may be …Don't go for grey if you want something long lasting. It may be fashionable now but tastes will swing against it at some point. Go for something with a bit of colour in. Which colour depends on the local building materials but pick something that's widely used on houses of all different ages locally.


everyone in the street has white over this masonry area! i don't like white generally even though it is very popular at the moment for interior and it has always been popular for exterior. but white is a high maintenance colour. my house has been painted in a light yellow colour, but that has become pretty grubby now.

i would think grey will stay fashionable for a while as it is a clean colour and one that doesn't look dirty and worn with time. i won't be keeping the house for longer than the next 5 years so whoever buys it can always paint it whatever colour they like. for now, i am looking for a colour that i don't need to paint again for the next 5 years and it will still look good.
mutley107/06/2020 11:38

the ivy has been removed already but it comes over from the neighbour's …the ivy has been removed already but it comes over from the neighbour's side so there is no guarantee it won't come over again. it is a tenanted property so i can not always rely on the tenants to remove the ivy as soon as it comes over. therefore it is very likely that the ivy will grow over the wall again in future and will have to be removed.



This will help, if not solve that particular problem.
Pandamansays07/06/2020 13:03

This will help, if not solve that particular problem.


that is good to know. i will ask the neighbour if she doesn't mind me going over there and pouring that over the ivy roots to kill it.
mutley107/06/2020 15:48

that is good to know. i will ask the neighbour if she doesn't mind me …that is good to know. i will ask the neighbour if she doesn't mind me going over there and pouring that over the ivy roots to kill it.


Doesn't work like that. Wait for the ivy to be in full leaf and growing, then spray all that you can see. There is no need to go onto their property, just spray all that is on yours. Initially, nothing will happen, but the plant will take it in through the leaves and down to the roots. It then kills it from the inside out, the leaves will start to go brown and it will eventually die. It's strong stuff and will kill everything it touches, so spray it carefully on a windless day.
Pandamansays07/06/2020 18:16

Doesn't work like that. Wait for the ivy to be in full leaf and growing, …Doesn't work like that. Wait for the ivy to be in full leaf and growing, then spray all that you can see. There is no need to go onto their property, just spray all that is on yours. Initially, nothing will happen, but the plant will take it in through the leaves and down to the roots. It then kills it from the inside out, the leaves will start to go brown and it will eventually die. It's strong stuff and will kill everything it touches, so spray it carefully on a windless day.


Seriously? Wow. Even the gardeners I asked never said you could do this! They all said you need to pour stuff down the roots of the ivy.

When I googled, it says you even need to dig up the roots of the ivy.

My neighbour was being difficult and wouldn't remove the ivy on her side so all I could do was remove it on my side.

She is a council tenant so I got the council to eventually come round to remove it from her side. But it had grown back again, although I am now in better terms with her, she says she will remove it, but I don't know if she will.

If this works as you say, I could kill the plant even without having to deal with her
Edited by: "mutley1" 7th Jun
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