Mole or dog?

39
Posted 10th Jan
We have recently found this hole in the fence between our patio and the neighbour's back garden.

It looks like a mole has dug its way up under the fence from the neighbour into our patio. I put the mortar edge and the dug earth back last week but found it all dug up again this afternoon.

I am thinking that it is a mole that has dug its way into our patio from the neighbour's garden but I don't know if our dog has done it trying to get into the neighbour's garden.

Anyone got any idea if a mole could dig this hole? It seems to be substantial as part of the wooden fence has also been dug up.
Community Updates
Ask

Groups

Top comments
I read the title and thought it an odd choice for a pet!
rat making a trackway between properties.
That's not like any mole damage I've ever seen and I've seen a lot
39 Comments
8112644731578679267.jpg
That's not like any mole damage I've ever seen and I've seen a lot
Speaking from experience, that's not a mole that's been digging.

Moles dig up, break the surface of the soil and leave a 'mole hill' which is typically circular and even in shape.

I think your dog is making a bid for freedom!!
Is your dog male? If so there is probably a lady dog in heat nearby.

Moles don't dig like that.
rat making a trackway between properties.
I read the title and thought it an odd choice for a pet!
PeacePipe10/01/2020 19:00

I read the title and thought it an odd choice for a pet!




...have you not met muttles before?
It might be one of them sausage dogs
psychedelicrenegade10/01/2020 18:24

Speaking from experience, that's not a mole that's been digging.Moles dig …Speaking from experience, that's not a mole that's been digging.Moles dig up, break the surface of the soil and leave a 'mole hill' which is typically circular and even in shape.I think your dog is making a bid for freedom!!


it does look like our dog has done it to get at something on the other side of the fence but i can't work out if the hole was dug from underneath or from above. it looked like it was dug from underneath the soil, which made me think it was a mole or some sort of animal that came out of the ground.

also the mortar had been dislodged and this would have to be some force if our dog dug that out of the paving with his claws. that piece of mortar would dislodge easier from underneath than from above.
joedastudd10/01/2020 18:33

Is your dog male? If so there is probably a lady dog in heat nearby.Moles …Is your dog male? If so there is probably a lady dog in heat nearby.Moles don't dig like that.



our dog is a male labrador but he has been neutered some years ago. he isn't interested in other dogs, only other animals that he can eat! or a cat.
It could be a vampire mole that is trying to dig itself out from a shallow grave!
Put a go pro on your dog.
But we're not allowed to have proper discussions
I hope you get the help you need mutley.
deeky10/01/2020 23:03

But we're not allowed to have proper discussions



I'm confused Your post is still active in one of his/her posts.
Edited by: "jimmy_the_fridge" 10th Jan
psychedelicrenegade10/01/2020 18:24

Speaking from experience, that's not a mole that's been digging.Moles dig …Speaking from experience, that's not a mole that's been digging.Moles dig up, break the surface of the soil and leave a 'mole hill' which is typically circular and even in shape.I think your dog is making a bid for freedom!!



A fox or a relatively nimble cat would probably jump over the fence, not feel the need to go under it.
A hedgehog wouldn't need that much width to get through; neither would a rat.

Unless a badger has visited/exited that way, I'm going to go with the suggestion of a dog too; most likely a terrier.
fanpages10/01/2020 23:51

A fox or a relatively nimble cat would probably jump over the fence, not …A fox or a relatively nimble cat would probably jump over the fence, not feel the need to go under it.A hedgehog wouldn't need that much width to get through; neither would a rat.Unless a badger has visited/exited that way, I'm going to go with the suggestion of a dog too; most likely a terrier.


A fox would dig a much bigger hole. A badger would just push the fence down and the paving slabs up. Mutley would surely have noticed another dog in the garden? A mole would dig on the lawn. Most likely a rat given the neat tidy pile - they can chew through concrete, floorboards, skirting boards, underlay and carpet.
Edited by: "JimboParrot" 11th Jan
jimmy_the_fridge10/01/2020 23:32

I'm confused Your post is still active in one of his/her posts.


Good spot. This might see it gone though
JimboParrot11/01/2020 06:45

A fox would dig a much bigger hole. A badger would just push the fence …A fox would dig a much bigger hole. A badger would just push the fence down and the paving slabs up. Mutley would surely have noticed another dog in the garden? A mole would dig on the lawn. Most likely a rat given the neat tidy pile - they can chew through concrete, floorboards, skirting boards, underlay and carpet.


the neighbour does not have a dog. we have seen cats regularly in the garden which have come over from neighbouring properties. we have also seen foxes in the garden.

i don't think it is a rat as there are holes in the wooden fence panels nearby that a rat could climb through so it wouldn't make any sense for a rat to dig a hole through concrete.

reading the comments, i am now thinking it can't be a mole as it doesn't make sense for the mole to dig through concrete when it can dig further down the garden where the patio ends and the garden starts.
psychedelicrenegade10/01/2020 18:24

Speaking from experience, that's not a mole that's been digging.Moles dig …Speaking from experience, that's not a mole that's been digging.Moles dig up, break the surface of the soil and leave a 'mole hill' which is typically circular and even in shape.I think your dog is making a bid for freedom!!


fanpages10/01/2020 23:51

A fox or a relatively nimble cat would probably jump over the fence, not …A fox or a relatively nimble cat would probably jump over the fence, not feel the need to go under it.A hedgehog wouldn't need that much width to get through; neither would a rat.Unless a badger has visited/exited that way, I'm going to go with the suggestion of a dog too; most likely a terrier.



JimboParrot11/01/2020 06:45

A fox would dig a much bigger hole. A badger would just push the fence …A fox would dig a much bigger hole. A badger would just push the fence down and the paving slabs up. Mutley would surely have noticed another dog in the garden? A mole would dig on the lawn. Most likely a rat given the neat tidy pile - they can chew through concrete, floorboards, skirting boards, underlay and carpet.



Oh, yes, I have interacted with many generations of foxes living next to me since we moved into the house at the bottom of their garden; if that fence didn't already have a fox-shaped hole in it, a fox would have jumped instead (as I said above). Their digging would be in the ground, otherwise.

I don't have any moles in the ground where I am now, but I am used to them in previously gardens I have had.

The only other creatures (not mentioned above) that I already considered, having witnessed their behaviour first-hand, & ruled-out, was a rabbit & a hedgehog (oh, & a mouse, but a mouse would have got under the fence without causing any damage).

I am familiar with rats; one of my kids has some as pets, & I have seen the damage/devastation they can cause in a very short space of time.

If this isn't yet another attention-seeking thread, then it was probably @mutley1's own dog.
Edited by: "fanpages" 11th Jan
The foxes round here to save jumping the 6' fence dig in the earth and go underneath.

We had a rat come indoors hence how I know what they can, and do, chew through. Also chewed through the playhouse back and lived under the floor - neatly divided into their bedroom, eating area and pooing area. The bedroom was lined with clematis dead flowerheads and there was the rat shaped indentation where they lay. The eating area was full of monkey nut shells the neighbours leave out and snail shells galore, and the poo area - well, pretty obvious. Extremely clean creatures from that viewpoint, but not want you want when at 2am you can hear it gnawing the floorboards in the understairs cupboard.
there are lots of rabbits nearby as we live next to a wood. i haven't yet seen a hedgehog in the garden but it wouldn't surprise me if they are there.

what i am puzzled about is why this particular area, where there is concrete to dig when there are other areas easier to dig further down the garden. if it is our dog, then he has done it again as i had put everything back when it was first dug.
Talking to a pest controller he told me that rats can travel up to five miles a night on a set route, so if you block that route off they move off to the next area. Apparently this is why it is recommended supermarkets move their stock around in the warehouse if there is a rodent problem. Now, of course, whether this is indeed true or not I don't know, but once we blocked off the hole in the floorboards with wire wire and wire mesh and laid several layers of thick planks of wood in the understairs cupboard we have not had a problem again.

I guess all animals use the easiest route so once the soil and bits under your fence have been disturbed once it is not an issue for them to do it again, plus of course the scent.
mutley111/01/2020 11:13

there are lots of rabbits nearby as we live next to a wood. i haven't yet …there are lots of rabbits nearby as we live next to a wood. i haven't yet seen a hedgehog in the garden but it wouldn't surprise me if they are there.what i am puzzled about is why this particular area, where there is concrete to dig when there are other areas easier to dig further down the garden. if it is our dog, then he has done it again as i had put everything back when it was first dug.


If your (or another) dog, then it will keep going back to the same place until you discipline (your own) properly or block it with something so heavy/large that the hole is no longer visible (&, even then, still would try once in a while).

That particular spot either had a suitable opening already that piqued curiosity originally, or there was another animal (or object of desire) on the other side of the fence at that point prior to the first excavation.
we can't discipline the dog as we let him in the garden by himself so we can not see what he gets up to. this is why i can not tell if it is our dog that has dug that hole.

i guess there may be something living in that area on the other side, which he wants to get to. i noticed that the hole is dug deep enough to see the roots of the plants that is growing there.
Edited by: "mutley1" 11th Jan
JimboParrot11/01/2020 11:19

Talking to a pest controller he told me that rats can travel up to five …Talking to a pest controller he told me that rats can travel up to five miles a night on a set route, so if you block that route off they move off to the next area. Apparently this is why it is recommended supermarkets move their stock around in the warehouse if there is a rodent problem. Now, of course, whether this is indeed true or not I don't know, but once we blocked off the hole in the floorboards with wire wire and wire mesh and laid several layers of thick planks of wood in the understairs cupboard we have not had a problem again.I guess all animals use the easiest route so once the soil and bits under your fence have been disturbed once it is not an issue for them to do it again, plus of course the scent.



Mice, as you would expect, are much the same. They follow approach/exit lines around objects (like skirting boards around the perimeter of a room), or by the sides of chairs/furniture, in order to avoid detection. The occasions when you may see a mouse "in the open" without any cover is a lot less frequent than when you don't see them navigating around an area in their preferred way. That is why placing (humane) traps perpendicular/in-line with other objects yields good results, especially if you release a captured mouse quickly.

Also, if you capture a mouse, you need to take it at least half a mile away from your property to release it, or else it is likely to find its way back again!
fanpages10/01/2020 23:51

A fox or a relatively nimble cat would probably jump over the fence, not …A fox or a relatively nimble cat would probably jump over the fence, not feel the need to go under it.A hedgehog wouldn't need that much width to get through; neither would a rat.Unless a badger has visited/exited that way, I'm going to go with the suggestion of a dog too; most likely a terrier.


Actually rats do dig to make comfortable access, living by fields I see it in "this" form, which is why I bothered replying.
mutley111/01/2020 11:31

we can't discipline the dog as we let him in the garden by himself so we …we can't discipline the dog as we let him in the garden by himself so we can not see what he gets up to. this is why i can not tell if it is our dog that has dug that hole.i guess there may be something living in that area on the other side, which he wants to get to. i noticed that the hole is dug deep enough to see the roots of the plants that is growing there.



Well, you could discipline if done right when caught "in the act". If you do leave your dog unattended in the garden then it is the most likely cause of this damage.

Perhaps it was bored & just needs something to do there.

To resolve the issue now, though, find an object (or objects) that are large enough (& heavy enough so your dog cannot move them) to cover ground level & vertical areas now left exposed, & it probably will not make a bid for freedom there again.

Should you be with your dog when it revisits the same point thereafter, & it shows continued interest, just relay a stern 'no' &, if your dog is obedient, then it will comply.

Perhaps also walk around the rest of your garden looking for other obvious areas where it may also try to exit, & take remedial action to ensure that cannot occur.

Once a dog senses there is something it can get to/reach, then it will continue on the same course of action unless thwarted.
i found the hole yesterday and this time i have left it alone and not put everything back like i did last week. today it looks undisturbed, that is, the hole doesn't look like it has been dug any bigger.

so if it is our dog, he has lost interest in the hole for now as otherwise he would continue to dig to make the hole bigger. so it may be another animal that has dug that hole. and now that i have not blocked the hole, it can get through and so does not need to dig it again.
fanpages10/01/2020 23:51

A fox or a relatively nimble cat would probably jump over the fence, not …A fox or a relatively nimble cat would probably jump over the fence, not feel the need to go under it.A hedgehog wouldn't need that much width to get through; neither would a rat.Unless a badger has visited/exited that way, I'm going to go with the suggestion of a dog too; most likely a terrier.



Mr_Gus11/01/2020 11:38

Actually rats do dig to make comfortable access, living by fields I see it …Actually rats do dig to make comfortable access, living by fields I see it in "this" form, which is why I bothered replying.



I didn't say rats do not dig; I said the size of the hole seen in the picture looked too large for that to be the case here.

Unless a freakish genetically-enhanced super-sized rat, of course.

[EDIT]: After two further comments (now both removed), I won't be posting again in this thread [/EDIT]
Edited by: "fanpages" 11th Jan
fanpages11/01/2020 11:45

I didn't say rats do not dig; I said the size of the hole seen in the …I didn't say rats do not dig; I said the size of the hole seen in the picture looked too large for that to be the case here.Unless a freakish genetically-enhanced super-sized rat, of course.


Thing is they don't necessarily make a "comfortable" rat width hole in this instance, not in a straight through dart, but as a wider bodied wiggle taking up more space, depth / added width comes with familiarity of the track as it is worn via use.
so i just let the dog in the garden an hour ago and i watched him as he walked past the hole. he didn't even so much as look at it but just walked past it without paying any attention. the hole is still undisturbed, which makes me think it wasn't him that dug that hole, otherwise he would take an interest in it. maybe sniff it as he walks past, if nothing else, but he wasn't even aware it was there when i watched him walk down the garden.
Husband trying to escape?
Derek_Fortescue_Shatwell11/01/2020 12:55

Husband trying to escape?


not sure why he is still here to be honest! i have tried to get rid of him but he just won't go.
i may need to make that hole bigger and leave myself!
mutley111/01/2020 11:31

we can't discipline the dog as we let him in the garden by himself so we …we can't discipline the dog as we let him in the garden by himself so we can not see what he gets up to.


So start going into the garden with your dog. FFS, Mutley, how can you know about renting out houses, but simple common sense things like this go over your head?

If you don’t want to go into the garden with your dog, put something over the area until he/she forgets about it. Done. Problem solved. It’s not that difficult.
mutley111/01/2020 12:14

so i just let the dog in the garden an hour ago and i watched him as he …so i just let the dog in the garden an hour ago and i watched him as he walked past the hole. he didn't even so much as look at it but just walked past it without paying any attention. the hole is still undisturbed, which makes me think it wasn't him that dug that hole, otherwise he would take an interest in it. maybe sniff it as he walks past, if nothing else, but he wasn't even aware it was there when i watched him walk down the garden.


Or, he knew he shouldn’t be digging there/wasn’t interested in it at this point in time?

It’s your dog, mutters. I have dogs. They do things like this. It’s not uncommon. Cover it up with a plant pot, forget about it yourself. Let the dog forget about it. Panic over.
Rat !,
Fire
sorted

Post a comment
Avatar
@
    Text

    Discussions

    Top Merchants