Name that plant please

18
Posted 3rd Oct
3304082-sx1nJ.jpgIt's a big plant, 12 foot tall. Thanks in advance.
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Black berry type things with large hard stones/seeds inside. Berries stain also.
Looks like Laurel to me. They do have dark berries into the autumn months.
Laurel leaf same as the ones I have in my garden
Ribena Tree
Word to the wise (or not so): Don't eat the berries. Certain Laurels produce cyanide. Oh, and also don't burn the leaves in an enclosed space either. Toxic fumes also.
Edited by: "Phsycronix" 3rd Oct
It is a laurel/bay

Word has it the oracle at Delphi chewed it to produce the 'visions'
don't try this at home kids
Phsycronix03/10/2019 15:32

Word to the wise (or not so): Don't eat the berries. Certain Laurels …Word to the wise (or not so): Don't eat the berries. Certain Laurels produce cyanide. Oh, and also don't burn the leaves in an enclosed space either. Toxic fumes also.


I was burning it yesterday, not an enclosed space though. Unfortunately the puppy is eating the berries every so often, so going to hack it right back and then hopefully have less plant and therefore less berries. Thanks everyone.
It's a Cherry Laurel (prunus laurocerasus), we have a hedge of it in our garden.

"We are no strangers to being asked if certain Laurel bushes are poisonous to household pets or humans (particularly small children). ALL parts (leaves, berries etc.) of all Laurels, apart from Bay Laurel, are poisonous to livestock and animals.

We have had no reports of children or pets being affected by the foliage of these hedging plants; in our experience they hold no real attraction, however it is best to avoid planting next to livestock and if you are concerned about your pets and children we’d recommend choosing Bay Laurel or looking at alternative hedging plants some of which are suggested below."
Edited by: "tregs" 3rd Oct
That's not good Midurix. The pit of the berry; especially if it's cherry laurel; contains cyanide. The leaves can also contain the toxins which is why you don't want to be breathing in too much smoke.

You need to pay very close attention to your puppy as if it starts to vomit, don't hesitate! I really hope it's ok and I'm sorry to put any undue worry on you.
Phsycronix03/10/2019 15:43

That's not good Midurix. The pit of the berry; especially if it's cherry …That's not good Midurix. The pit of the berry; especially if it's cherry laurel; contains cyanide. The leaves can also contain the toxins which is why you don't want to be breathing in too much smoke.You need to pay very close attention to your puppy as if it starts to vomit, don't hesitate! I really hope it's ok and I'm sorry to put any undue worry on you.


It's a relatively new build and I think they grow very fast, so are picked to give quick privacy. Will have to think about it.
Laurel
Hard to compost too.
MIDURIX03/10/2019 15:51

It's a relatively new build and I think they grow very fast, so are picked …It's a relatively new build and I think they grow very fast, so are picked to give quick privacy. Will have to think about it.


No. laurel takes a good amount of time to establish, it is a great wind & vandal proof protector especially if planted in 2 rows (staggered) ..lovely luxurious leaves which attracts good amounts of much needed wildlife, tough as the mutts nuts, NOT A WEED, & will be an absolute mare to remove (please don't,) ..just learn to love it, can be pruned hard & look fantastic again shortly after.
Waxy leaves dry hard, burn well but with smoke.I always used to try & convince folk to take some for hedging, losing to the crud that is Lleyandi cyp ..Grr folk who wanted fast fix & then hated the die off & mess.

Love laurel, a plant that looks fantastic mature but will need a good 10 years+ to really establish!
Edited by: "Mr_Gus" 3rd Oct
Mr_Gus03/10/2019 21:28

No. laurel takes a good amount of time to establish, it is a great wind & …No. laurel takes a good amount of time to establish, it is a great wind & vandal proof protector especially if planted in 2 rows (staggered) ..lovely luxurious leaves which attracts good amounts of much needed wildlife, tough as the mutts nuts, NOT A WEED, & will be an absolute mare to remove (please don't,) ..just learn to love it, can be pruned hard & look fantastic again shortly after.Waxy leaves dry hard, burn well but with smoke.I always used to try & convince folk to take some for hedging, losing to the crud that is Lleyandi cyp ..Grr folk who wanted fast fix & then hated the die off & mess.Love laurel, a plant that looks fantastic mature but will need a good 10 years+ to really establish!


"One of the most popular choices for privacy hedging, the cherry laurel is extremely fast growing"
It is a newish build and is now 12-15 feet tall after a few years, so I think you are wrong. Plus it may be killing our puppy so I'm not sure learning to love it is on the cards.
Is cherry laurel some recent mutant hybrid that wasn't with us some 25 years ago by landscapers maybe? it used to be varigated / non, laurel & a few small leaf varieties,

I wouln't panic unless you have verified what the dose is, likely its just upset tummy, some fruits we eat have cyanide in the pips..yet we don't panic.

In fact the leaves will likely contain the largest amounts of general toxicity compared to the stone.

Dog size & weight will play an important part as to how much is danger level, & that sort of info is really hard to gather & put into context!

Apple, pear tree's etc are also "cyanide" carriers
However a felled apple tree log cut to size for a young dog has very close grain so is less of a choke hazard than a regular stick found down the park (& less spikes in feet from walking in socks).

Perhaps get & encourage chewing via a deer antler (treated, not from your local farm in raw state due to the blood vessels which will go stinky & bacterium forms) ..a proper one for around 7-9 quid will last well if you encourage the pup to use it & make it an important game & "precious thing"

One of the things that pee's me off with non clarified facts with vets is the blanket statement no / tiny amounts of liver, ..so I ask on what grounds, toxicity they say, what levels I ask, & that's the impasse!
Alcohol is toxic (in big doses)
I searched for years to find decent research on the toxicity of liver, about a decade of looking! ..if there is no firm data then its pretty much a scare story, ..just a heads up FYI
Rationale says don't let an animal feast on something that makes it sick / hard to process, but blind info is ridiculous, especially from a professional like vets, (more than one) ...yes a polar bear liver is deemed nasty & toxic, but my dogs likelihood o scoffing polar bear liver was negligible to say the least.

P.S. polar bear stinks to prepare & takes a long time to cook when done as a typical stew, more than we are used to with a bit of cow!

..& as your pup is a scoffer (likely chewing to relieve teeth as well as inquisitiveness) ..IF your dog / pup ever somehow gets hold of modern rat killer (seed / block form then milk is the answer, (milk generally causes loose stools & worse, but it is a de-activator for the toxins, so you'd need to encourage a dog to lap some up, you do need quite a bit even to affect a puppy, but obviously "some" is bad enough to a distraught animal owner!
Edited by: "Mr_Gus" 4th Oct
Mr_Gus04/10/2019 13:29

Is cherry laurel some recent mutant hybrid that wasn't with us some 25 …Is cherry laurel some recent mutant hybrid that wasn't with us some 25 years ago by landscapers maybe? it used to be varigated / non, laurel & a few small leaf varieties, I wouln't panic unless you have verified what the dose is, likely its just upset tummy, some fruits we eat have cyanide in the pips..yet we don't panic.In fact the leaves will likely contain the largest amounts of general toxicity compared to the stone.Dog size & weight will play an important part as to how much is danger level, & that sort of info is really hard to gather & put into context!Apple, pear tree's etc are also "cyanide" carriersHowever a felled apple tree log cut to size for a young dog has very close grain so is less of a choke hazard than a regular stick found down the park (& less spikes in feet from walking in socks).Perhaps get & encourage chewing via a deer antler (treated, not from your local farm in raw state due to the blood vessels which will go stinky & bacterium forms) ..a proper one for around 7-9 quid will last well if you encourage the pup to use it & make it an important game & "precious thing"One of the things that pee's me off with non clarified facts with vets is the blanket statement no / tiny amounts of liver, ..so I ask on what grounds, toxicity they say, what levels I ask, & that's the impasse!Alcohol is toxic (in big doses)I searched for years to find decent research on the toxicity of liver, about a decade of looking! ..if there is no firm data then its pretty much a scare story, ..just a heads up FYI Rationale says don't let an animal feast on something that makes it sick / hard to process, but blind info is ridiculous, especially from a professional like vets, (more than one) ...yes a polar bear liver is deemed nasty & toxic, but my dogs likelihood o scoffing polar bear liver was negligible to say the least.P.S. polar bear stinks to prepare & takes a long time to cook when done as a typical stew, more than we are used to with a bit of cow!..& as your pup is a scoffer (likely chewing to relieve teeth as well as inquisitiveness) ..IF your dog / pup ever somehow gets hold of modern rat killer (seed / block form then milk is the answer, (milk generally causes loose stools & worse, but it is a de-activator for the toxins, so you'd need to encourage a dog to lap some up, you do need quite a bit even to affect a puppy, but obviously "some" is bad enough to a distraught animal owner!


There is absolutely no signs that there is anything wrong with the dog, but it currently weights 5.5Kg and it should just about of stopped growing. Dog has lots to chew on and is very fond of the Yak milk chews, but just hoovers up the berries which can't really be stopped without catching him in the act and saying no, but that's a tricky one.
Laurel is a very useful and attractive hedging plant in the right situation but it does need a yearly trim to keep it under control. I always used to put the clippings through a shredder and use as a mulch, much better to make use of it than burning.The late Spring/early Summer flowers are very fragrant depending on variety, the berries are a great source of food in Autumn for blackbirds and thrushes and the dense foliage is perfect for nest building. I wouldn't dream of replacing it, you'd struggle to find a more useful plant for the same purpose.
Edited by: "jaketheplumber" 4th Oct
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