Found 25th Oct 2016
Could someone recommend a NAS that's best for my situation? Never had one before so looking for advice.

I'm looking for a NAS for my home, all devices in the house are Linux or Android, no Windows or Mac at all and there never will be.

I want a NAS so that I can rsync the drives in my PC to it via chron as a backup but also so that I can access something via another device occasionally without having to switch the PC on. It's just for downloads so nothing too important, they won't change much and they're not important enough to get a more thorough (and expensive) solution.

I'm looking for something with 4tb or more of space. Storage capacity is more important to me than speed. One bay is fine, two would be a bonus for expansion.

Since the files will also be stored on my PC and I don't care enough to have them mirrored real-time, I don't really need RAID mirroring. In a way I'd prefer not to use RAID as I'd rather have something that in the worst case I can just pop into a PC and access the files.

I need rsync support. SSH/SFTP and NFS would be good. Don't really care about DLNA and streaming stuff and don't want to use samba/windows shares.

Any recommendations? Would I be better off just using a pi with an external disk attached to it?

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8 Comments

What have you got against microservers?

kester76

What have you got against microservers?



G8 Microserver

Original Poster

kester76

What have you got against microservers?



Size and power consumption

dar72

Size and power consumption


Size maybe but power consumption is pretty low on these devices

why not buy a small older pc off ebay? then you aren't restricted an older ivybridge cpu/pc can be picked up cheap.

Original Poster

Protoype

why not buy a small older pc off ebay? then you aren't restricted an … why not buy a small older pc off ebay? then you aren't restricted an older ivybridge cpu/pc can be picked up cheap.



Again, size and power consumption, possibly even more so than a micro server depending on how small.



So are these home NAS devices not worth it? That's what I'm getting from the answers so far. My idea at the moment is to just do this with a RPi2 that I have hanging around doing nothing and buy a new external disk for it then use OpenMediaVault or just Arch ARM.

Yes the Pi has shared bandwidth for the USB and Ethernet and the CPU isn't the fastest but I'm not really wanting to stream and with this type of setup I can move to better hardware in the future if I need to (eg a NUC or a microserver). I could also just plug the disk in anywhere via USB for bigger file transfers.

Is there anything I'm missing out on by doing the more DIY approach rather than buying an actual NAS product?

dar72

Again, size and power consumption, possibly even more so than a micro … Again, size and power consumption, possibly even more so than a micro server depending on how small.So are these home NAS devices not worth it? That's what I'm getting from the answers so far. My idea at the moment is to just do this with a RPi2 that I have hanging around doing nothing and buy a new external disk for it then use OpenMediaVault or just Arch ARM.Yes the Pi has shared bandwidth for the USB and Ethernet and the CPU isn't the fastest but I'm not really wanting to stream and with this type of setup I can move to better hardware in the future if I need to (eg a NUC or a microserver). I could also just plug the disk in anywhere via USB for bigger file transfers.Is there anything I'm missing out on by doing the more DIY approach rather than buying an actual NAS product?



​I don't think you realise how slow transfer rates can get. The range is from 20MBs to 120MBs depending on hardware. You're better off just plugging a usb hard drive into a mid range router if you're not too fussed about transfer speed. I used a microserver and a switch to get 120MBs due to large file transfers but if you're talking about a couple of meg a wifi router is the best option.

Original Poster

kester76

​I don't think you realise how slow transfer rates can get. The range is f … ​I don't think you realise how slow transfer rates can get. The range is from 20MBs to 120MBs depending on hardware. You're better off just plugging a usb hard drive into a mid range router if you're not too fussed about transfer speed. I used a microserver and a switch to get 120MBs due to large file transfers but if you're talking about a couple of meg a wifi router is the best option.



I do realise that, I just don't think it's all that bad for my needs since the data won't change much and for the initial copy of the couple of terabytes of data, I can plug the drive in via USB and copy it that way rather than over the network.



So, since I have a Pi 2 hanging around, I installed OpenMediaVault on it and connected an old 120gb laptop disk in a caddy just to try it out, it's working fine for me so far, including streaming video which I don't need anyway, that works without any buffering.

However, I quickly decided having MPD to stream music might actually be a good thing, noticed it couldn't be installed in version 3 of OpenMediaVault, only version 2. Then having thought about it, OMV doesn't do anything special, it's just an interface to something I can do myself much quicker than messing around in a web interface and being Debian they have this weird philosophy of using out of date software, something I don't really want to deal with. So I've put Arch ARM (Arch is what I have on everything else) on it and set up SSH, rsync and NFS shares manually...as well as installing MPD. Works fine, performance is fine for my needs, if I ever outgrow the performance I can just install Arch ARM or x86 on a huge range of devices from a more up to date pi or alternative like banana pi up to a micro server and beyond, at that point I can just plug the drive in and copy my config over and off I go.

The only issue I see so far with this approach is that I'm likely to buy an external drive to do this as they're just cheaper and if I go to something like a microserver, something SATA would be better. However, I'd probably just rip the caddy apart, take the disk out and plug it in to the server. Yeah warranty but it's not a huge issue, especially as that's likely to be over a year down the line anyway.
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