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    New landlords - looking for advice on the furnishings..

    Hi,

    We are turning landlords and are in the process of getting the home tenant ready.. We are renting out our flat in London so that we can rent a slightly bigger place (so landlords and tenants at the same time). Anyway have gone through a couple of checklists for getting the house ready (electrical check , gas safety, fully managed service with the agents etc). Currently in the process of getting a double and single bed and though the agents said they could bring in divan beds - I am angling towards a more solid wooden bed. Any landlord experience on whether I should stick with the divan beds (easy to dispose etc? or would i be better off with investing in a solid bed ?). Also do they do solid base beds as opposed to the slats? I can see some good offers in the January sales so should not get too heavy on the pocket i think..

    43 Comments

    Well, for the tenant a bed is a bed. In the landlords perspective, the solid bed that you have mentioned will obviously come with a disposable mattress. That is an advantage because you would keep the solid base and if need be replace the mattress. If it was a divan bed hygienically I'd imagine the base would have wear to it too so you'd have to replace the whole bed. With the solid bed you'd give it a wipe and add new mattress so it lasts longer. It really is your choice based on that fact.

    I'd agree with asha_b.

    Divan beds are no more disposable than bedsteads (in fact I'd say they're more difficult to move / bin because of their bulk.

    I rent properties regularly for work (medium-term contracts). With the exception of one property, they have all had divan beds. I like them because they feel more sturdy than a (cheap) slatted bedstead and the storage drawers are useful (especially if other storage is limited). They downsides are that they look less stylish and the cloth covering on the base does need to be kept in good, clean condition to not be off-putting.

    A family member has tenents and left a very solid expensive wooden bed in 1 of the rooms, the bed ended up been chopped up for a bonfire in the garden! Theyd taken it to bits and left to go horrid in the shed so they just burnt it but never said anything till they had left! Id go cheap, if they want better then they can buy it

    SuffolkLad222

    I'd agree with asha_b. Divan beds are no more disposable than bedsteads … I'd agree with asha_b. Divan beds are no more disposable than bedsteads (in fact I'd say they're more difficult to move / bin because of their bulk. I rent properties regularly for work (medium-term contracts). With the exception of one property, they have all had divan beds. I like them because they feel more sturdy than a (cheap) slatted bedstead and the storage drawers are useful (especially if other storage is limited). They downsides are that they look less stylish and the cloth covering on the base does need to be kept in good, clean condition to not be off-putting.



    Divans are good because you can chop them up and dispose of them so easy, for us there pretty much disposable. Think we pay £150 for a double bed and mattress every time the tenancy ends.

    OP it depends on the tenants, I would go for solid personally if you know it's not going to get chipped and damaged, you can add the bed to the tenancy and if there's any damage just charge them for it.

    Original Poster

    SuffolkLad222

    I'd agree with asha_b. Divan beds are no more disposable than bedsteads … I'd agree with asha_b. Divan beds are no more disposable than bedsteads (in fact I'd say they're more difficult to move / bin because of their bulk. I rent properties regularly for work (medium-term contracts). With the exception of one property, they have all had divan beds. I like them because they feel more sturdy than a (cheap) slatted bedstead and the storage drawers are useful (especially if other storage is limited). They downsides are that they look less stylish and the cloth covering on the base does need to be kept in good, clean condition to not be off-putting.



    ok so you would prefer a divan over slatted base - that's good . I was of the opinion that tenants might prefer the solid bed so thanks for that info..

    Original Poster

    ryanbower94

    Divans are good because you can chop them up and dispose of them so easy, … Divans are good because you can chop them up and dispose of them so easy, for us there pretty much disposable. Think we pay £150 for a double bed and mattress every time the tenancy ends. OP it depends on the tenants, I would go for solid personally if you know it's not going to get chipped and damaged, you can add the bed to the tenancy and if there's any damage just charge them for it.



    yes, that £150 is about what we got quoted too - so that sounds about right.. and thnx for the idea about adding it to the inventory - we could look at that
    Edited by: "blkwhte" 5th Jan

    Banned

    ellese

    A family member has tenents and left a very solid expensive wooden bed in … A family member has tenents and left a very solid expensive wooden bed in 1 of the rooms, the bed ended up been chopped up for a bonfire in the garden! Theyd taken it to bits and left to go horrid in the shed so they just burnt it but never said anything till they had left! Id go cheap, if they want better then they can buy it


    top banter

    blkwhte

    ok so you would prefer a divan over slatted base - that's good . I was of … ok so you would prefer a divan over slatted base - that's good . I was of the opinion that tenants might prefer the solid bed so thanks for that info..



    I'd prefer a divan over a cheap and flimsy bedstead or if the drawer space was a key factor (e.g. if there was limited storage otherwise).
    However, if the slatted bed was good quality and strong and storage wasn't an issue, I would be equally happy with this.

    If I was a landlord, I would go for a good quality slatted bedstead. The benefits of being easier to clean for longevity outweigh the benefits of a divan. A 5 year old divan will look grubby, whereas the same aged bedstead will look pretty decent (unless deliberately wrecked).
    The key for me (if not already apparent) is that the bed must be strong. It's in your interests too as a cheap one will break and need to be replaced more often.

    Wooden beds are fine and look better, as you have done question what the letting agent tell you if it doesn't sound right. Less likely to stain. Just change mattress for each new tenant, or they can get their own.

    ellese

    A family member has tenents and left a very solid expensive wooden bed in … A family member has tenents and left a very solid expensive wooden bed in 1 of the rooms, the bed ended up been chopped up for a bonfire in the garden! Theyd taken it to bits and left to go horrid in the shed so they just burnt it but never said anything till they had left! Id go cheap, if they want better then they can buy it



    Presumably the deduction from the security deposit covered the replacement cost?

    Original Poster

    SuffolkLad222

    I'd prefer a divan over a cheap and flimsy bedstead or if the drawer … I'd prefer a divan over a cheap and flimsy bedstead or if the drawer space was a key factor (e.g. if there was limited storage otherwise). However, if the slatted bed was good quality and strong and storage wasn't an issue, I would be equally happy with this. If I was a landlord, I would go for a good quality slatted bedstead. The benefits of being easier to clean for longevity outweigh the benefits of a divan. A 5 year old divan will look grubby, whereas the same aged bedstead will look pretty decent (unless deliberately wrecked). The key for me (if not already apparent) is that the bed must be strong. It's in your interests too as a cheap one will break and need to be replaced more often.


    Yes storage is key as it's a small flat and I've just been into a store to look at a divan bed and the storage they offer is really small so I am very close to ruling it out..

    Original Poster

    davewave

    Wooden beds are fine and look better, as you have done question what the … Wooden beds are fine and look better, as you have done question what the letting agent tell you if it doesn't sound right. Less likely to stain. Just change mattress for each new tenant, or they can get their own.


    Yes, been standing my ground on that one with the agents. Being new to all this I was thinking maybe I am missing some point since most rental places seem to come with a divan. Atm after going through all your posts am thinking of getting a wooden bed and maybe a memory foam topper (so it offers more protection as vs a normal mattress protector) and change it for each tenant..

    blkwhte

    Yes, been standing my ground on that one with the agents. Being new to … Yes, been standing my ground on that one with the agents. Being new to all this I was thinking maybe I am missing some point since most rental places seem to come with a divan. Atm after going through all your posts am thinking of getting a wooden bed and maybe a memory foam topper (so it offers more protection as vs a normal mattress protector) and change it for each tenant..


    make sure you get an inventory (standard practice) so that its all clear what state the flat is in when you handover the property. Make sure you feel comfortable that the tenants situation makes sense, they can afford it etc.
    Hopefully you're using a repuatable and decent letting agent, tends to attract more professional tenants.

    Personally I'd buy some strong slatted second hand wooden bed frames and a cheapish mattress. Wooden frames will last and the mattress can be replaced every few years. 1 piece of advise, photograph EVERYTHING and get the tenant to sign the photographs with their contract. A written inventory is worthless if you can't show proof of the condition. And make sure you put their deposit in a protection scheme.... it's illegal not to and makes the contract void if you don't, plenty of free services (I used http://www.depositprotection.com/) but just Google to find one you're happy with.

    Rent it unfurnished . Much less hassle .
    Edited by: "psychobitchfromhell" 5th Jan

    Lol at the poor tenants. I'm sure they pay a fair rent. How would you like sleeping on a cheap mattress. A half decent memory mattresses can be had for about a 100 quid. Unbelievable.

    CookinBat

    Lol at the poor tenants. I'm sure they pay a fair rent. How would you … Lol at the poor tenants. I'm sure they pay a fair rent. How would you like sleeping on a cheap mattress. A half decent memory mattresses can be had for about a 100 quid. Unbelievable.



    ​if they pay a fair rent then they can invest in their own mattress and take it to any new property. unfortunately landlords also pay fair tax and stamp duty and estate agents fees. TBH landlords shouldn't be expected to provide 5 star furnishings for a tenant.

    psychobitchfromhell

    Rent it unfurnished . Much less hassle .



    Yes, this is what we do for our places, furniture is just another hassle that we don't want to get involved with. We've never had issues finding tenants looking for unfurnished property.

    nbgrobbo

    Yes, this is what we do for our places, furniture is just another hassle … Yes, this is what we do for our places, furniture is just another hassle that we don't want to get involved with. We've never had issues finding tenants looking for unfurnished property.


    Me neither. Mine is rented unfurnished. The difference in rental income is not worth the hassle

    Ours are always unfurnished. As mentioned above before, less hassle and quicker turnaround at the end of the tenancy.
    All that needs doing is a clean and fresh paint and a carpet clean or replacement.
    Make sure you keep your inspection paperwork copies, as most things run for a year.

    Original Poster

    psychobitchfromhell

    Me neither. Mine is rented unfurnished. The difference in rental income … Me neither. Mine is rented unfurnished. The difference in rental income is not worth the hassle



    we decided to leave everything for the new tenants (fridge,washing ma/c,sofa,wardrobes) except the beds because personally I would like to bring in my own mattress - however the advice from the agents was to get the beds as well rather than advertise partly furnished ... I must admit after just a day of looking at the options (plus conforming to standards - fire resistant etc) I am beginning to wonder if I need to revert back to just 'partly furnished' as we originally intended.

    Original Poster

    CookinBat

    Lol at the poor tenants. I'm sure they pay a fair rent. How would you … Lol at the poor tenants. I'm sure they pay a fair rent. How would you like sleeping on a cheap mattress. A half decent memory mattresses can be had for about a 100 quid. Unbelievable.


    memory foam thickness is key - I have seen some offers online for under £100 however there is no indication about the density or the thickness of the memory foam .. ultimately they might end up being junk.

    Wooden or metal beds for sure. Divans will become soiled quickly.
    You may find tenants may ask you remove the bed so they can put in their own so wooden or metal ones can be dismantled easily and taken away for storage.

    Slat base will be fine.

    davewave

    ​if they pay a fair rent then they can invest in their own mattress and t … ​if they pay a fair rent then they can invest in their own mattress and take it to any new property. unfortunately landlords also pay fair tax and stamp duty and estate agents fees. TBH landlords shouldn't be expected to provide 5 star furnishings for a tenant.


    Expecting landlords to provide an adequate bed and other furniture, within reason ie, not cheap n nasty is hardly 5* furnishing Dave and it wont break the bank. It's not ok to be greedy and thoughtless. Rise above it...

    blkwhte

    memory foam thickness is key - I have seen some offers online for under … memory foam thickness is key - I have seen some offers online for under £100 however there is no indication about the density or the thickness of the memory foam .. ultimately they might end up being junk.


    I'm sure the thickness of the mattress will be stated, not sure you need to be too concerned about the density.
    Our local co-op and lidl often sell foam mattresses (not mf) We bought one once and it was better than our current more expensive mf one.

    blkwhte

    we decided to leave everything for the new tenants (fridge,washing … we decided to leave everything for the new tenants (fridge,washing ma/c,sofa,wardrobes) except the beds because personally I would like to bring in my own mattress - however the advice from the agents was to get the beds as well rather than advertise partly furnished ... I must admit after just a day of looking at the options (plus conforming to standards - fire resistant etc) I am beginning to wonder if I need to revert back to just 'partly furnished' as we originally intended.


    The more furniture you leave the more you have to look after, the longer and more complicated the inventory and the more you have to replace. I would go for something well built but cheap because there is no point shelling out a fortune for something you may have to replace in a year. Good luck in your venture

    I wouldn't trust a slatted bed in a tenancy.

    More inclined to break a slat if they are rough, jump on the bed, flop onto the bed etc.

    hottoast

    I wouldn't trust a slatted bed in a tenancy. More inclined to break a … I wouldn't trust a slatted bed in a tenancy. More inclined to break a slat if they are rough, jump on the bed, flop onto the bed etc.



    Tenants are responsible for damage to property so they will be liable for this.

    True, as long as the letting agents are thorough in their job.

    I've always lived in rental and I'll be honest I don't want any soft furnishings provided just white goods. I've always got my own beds, wardrobes and sofas. that way I know the hygiene state and if it breaks it's my problem.
    As a tenants point of view I wouldn't want a bed provided as it may be no good for me.
    I would go for the wooden bed if I had a choice as divans are ugly and look yuck after use my current wooden bed frame even though cheap has lasted us 13 years and that's had kids jumping all over it.
    to be honest I prefer partly furnished which includes white goods only it's less hassle for tenants too having to look after the landlords furniture which may not be great quality.
    hope that helps you out.

    psychobitchfromhell

    Rent it unfurnished . Much less hassle .



    ​Always let unfurnished. Way, way too much hassle furnished.
    Experience 10+ years letting out my own houses now sold and thank God
    Make sure your clients deposit is held correctly!

    nbgrobbo

    Yes, this is what we do for our places, furniture is just another hassle … Yes, this is what we do for our places, furniture is just another hassle that we don't want to get involved with. We've never had issues finding tenants looking for unfurnished property.



    ​Absolutely agree!

    CookinBat

    Expecting landlords to provide an adequate bed and other furniture, … Expecting landlords to provide an adequate bed and other furniture, within reason ie, not cheap n nasty is hardly 5* furnishing Dave and it wont break the bank. It's not ok to be greedy and thoughtless. Rise above it...



    ​Have you been a landlord?

    mutley1

    Tenants are responsible for damage to property so they will be liable for … Tenants are responsible for damage to property so they will be liable for this.



    ​Have you rented out a property? Thought not!

    dothedealnow

    ​Have you rented out a property? Thought not!



    I am a buy let investor so yes.

    mutley1

    I am a buy let investor so yes.




    Can I ask, where do you BTL? Birmingham, London, Manchester ?

    Thanks

    MarioMan

    Can I ask, where do you BTL? Birmingham, London, Manchester ?Thanks



    I and my husband are buy to let investors in london.

    mutley1

    I and my husband are buy to let investors in london.



    Okay,

    Sorry for being nosey, can I ask a few more questions? Answer if you want/or PM me

    - Can I ask the average monthly rent NET income you receive per month on 1 3bed house?
    - Which part of london, north, south etc and what zone?
    - Is now a good time to buy or should I wait a year, for prices to fall?


    Thanks

    MarioMan

    Okay, Sorry for being nosey, can I ask a few more questions? Answer if … Okay, Sorry for being nosey, can I ask a few more questions? Answer if you want/or PM me- Can I ask the average monthly rent NET income you receive per month on 1 3bed house?- Which part of london, north, south etc and what zone?- Is now a good time to buy or should I wait a year, for prices to fall?Thanks



    Are you looking to go into btl? We own properties in south west london, north london and east london. If you genuinely want to get into this business then i am happy to answer questions but otherwise i would rather not engage in general discussion.

    MarioMan

    Okay, Sorry for being nosey, can I ask a few more questions? Answer if … Okay, Sorry for being nosey, can I ask a few more questions? Answer if you want/or PM me- Can I ask the average monthly rent NET income you receive per month on 1 3bed house?- Which part of london, north, south etc and what zone?- Is now a good time to buy or should I wait a year, for prices to fall?Thanks



    ​Prices won't fall. Look at the historic prices, they may blip slightly but the trend is always upwards. You need to look at all the implications of costs, tax, fees, insurance maintenance and wonder if a say C5% yield on a few or less props is worth ir
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