New MOT rules, Heads Up your Car could be impounded

53
Found 5th Mar 2018
New MOT test rules coming in May 2018!



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From May 2018 the MoT test is set to get a shake up which will see the introduction of new failure and defect categories.






The test will now categorise defects as Dangerous, Major or Minor.


Under the new rules drivers will fail their MoT test if they receive a Dangerous or Major fault, And will be unable to drive it away from the garage, Until the defect has been repaired!






Furthermore those who receive a Minor can still pass the test. But Minor faults will now, be printed onto the car’s MoT certificate.






I find this unfair, They will have us all over a barrel to charge what they want to fix the car.






You won’t be able to take your car away and return it for a retest like in the past.

you won’t be able to go to another garage to shop around for a better price, or even take it to you own driveway to fix the faults, if your mechanically minded. They’ll basically have your pride and joy impounded.

Best to book a pre mot inspection and have any work carried out before presenting your car for its proper MOT from now on

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As an mot tester/mechanic myself, there is nothing in place or going to be put in place (maybe in the future, who knows) to stop you from taking your vehicle away after a test if it failed, there has always been a dangerous criteria for a fail item or indeed for a non-testable item.
The whole manual has been re-written & there are now a whole raft of new testable items & also no longer a pass/fail. It will now be listed as minor (pass) major (fail) & dangerous.

OK here's some light reading for guys & gals (below clickable links) & when you've read them all & understood it all, I'll be asking questions


Special notice 01-18

Pdf of the testing manuals up till the 19th may 2018. 3rd one down is the draft of the new manual, which,i should imagine is still subject to revision, because as a tester some things don't make sense.

Matters of testing

Special notice 02-18 mot testing guide.


Edited by: "richp" 5th Mar 2018
if you are getting the car MOT'd before its expiry then the car still has a valid MOT certificate so surely you can drive it? I assume the scenario given would only apply if the car didn't have any MOT in the first place?
Edited by: "VikJ" 5th Mar 2018
My mot station doesn't do repairs.
53 Comments
.MUFC.7 h, 0 m ago

You presume wrong, On the same note, Just because a car passes an MOT it …You presume wrong, On the same note, Just because a car passes an MOT it doesn't mean it's roadworthy or it could become unroadworthy the second it leaves the MOT station etc..



Yep, the day after my old car passed it's MOT one of the wheels fell off whilst driving! Yes the whole wheel!
I stormed up to the garage to complain, they said "oh we don't check the wheels".
Yet the car originally failed due to the horn not working and needing new wiper blades! Yeah, cause that's a lot more dangerous then a wheel falling off!!!
Satan_Claws31 m ago

Yep, the day after my old car passed it's MOT one of the wheels fell off …Yep, the day after my old car passed it's MOT one of the wheels fell off whilst driving! Yes the whole wheel! I stormed up to the garage to complain, they said "oh we don't check the wheels". Yet the car originally failed due to the horn not working and needing new wiper blades! Yeah, cause that's a lot more dangerous then a wheel falling off!!!


Technically they do check the wheels:
Tyre integrity and tread.
Wheel bearings and steering play.

All checked by hand rotating the wheels and rocking by hand to check for excessive movement.

I’d check to see if your OH has taken out a large insurance pack recently.
SOUTHWALES19 h, 23 m ago

Best thing to do is buy a £5995 Dacia every 3 years, then no more mot's to …Best thing to do is buy a £5995 Dacia every 3 years, then no more mot's to worry about.


The shame of driving a dacia. Hell no. 😴
Oneday7710 h, 16 m ago

Technically they do check the wheels:Tyre integrity and tread. Wheel …Technically they do check the wheels:Tyre integrity and tread. Wheel bearings and steering play. All checked by hand rotating the wheels and rocking by hand to check for excessive movement. I’d check to see if your OH has taken out a large insurance pack recently.


MynameisM5th Mar

Moonwalk can you please show us the place where it says this unless a …Moonwalk can you please show us the place where it says this unless a unscrupulous garage has told you this. I can't see how the garages would do this as trust me they don't have the time to fix every single car they mot. It would be too impractical for them and for the people whose car it is. I have skimmed thorough the guidelines but can't find anything about this seen loads of stuff on stricter rules for emissions and 1 main one for diesel cars is any smoke any colour if it comes out of a car at a mot centre whilst it's in there is a fail. That isn't really very clear as every single car gives off smoke unless it's say electric I assume there must be some kind of a limit though.


I believe it was the Express online, I can not locate the specific part that mentioned it now or the exact article (that, or they have now edited that part out, As they sometimes do online when they realise they have made an error).

TO CLARIFY;
Its now looking like driving away with a vehicle in dangerously advised condition has always been a thing, However the wording has now changed to include ‘Dangerous’ as an exact category printed onto your fail sheet, and so if you then, drive away against that advice, and are unfortunate enough to be pulled by the plod, They will see this on your paperwork, or on their onboard ANPR display in the police car, And you will likely be fined or your car impounded.

Also if you were to have an accident on the way home you could be charged with dangerous driving and they will throw the book at you!

your options are limited to having the vehicle repaired at the MOT garage (if they do repairs).
Or arranging a tow with an A-Frame, or other transportation method to a suitable garage.
Edited by: "-Azel-" 6th Mar 2018
SOUTHWALES5th Mar 2018

Best thing to do is buy a £5995 Dacia every 3 years, then no more mot's to …Best thing to do is buy a £5995 Dacia every 3 years, then no more mot's to worry about.


Good point, Maybe that’s the plan,
This will surely result in more new car (Safe!) sales, and less old cars (Dangerous), remaining on our roads,

If i might add, in the long run this will be worse for our environment/ Air quality and co2 emissions.

Because with the production of each new vehicle, As much co2 is release as comes out of the cars, exhaust pipe in its whole life time! (17 tonnes C02 for a Ford Mondeo, medium spec).


What's the carbon footprint of ... a new car?

33389722-kPVoC.jpgThe carbon footprint of making a car is immensely complex. Ores have to be dug out of the ground and the metals extracted. These have to be turned into parts. Other components have to be brought together: rubber tyres, plastic dashboards, paint, and so on. All of this involves transporting things around the world. The whole lot then has to be assembled, and every stage in the process requires energy. The companies that make cars have offices and other infrastructure with their own carbon footprints, which we need to somehow allocate proportionately to the cars that are made.

In other words, even more than with most items, the manufacture of a car causes ripples that extend throughout the economy. To give just one simple example among millions, the assembly plant uses phones and they in turn had to be manufactured, along with the phone lines that transmit the calls. The ripples go on and on for ever. Attempts to capture all these stages by adding them up individually are doomed from the outset to result in an underestimate, because the task is just too big.

The best we can do is use so-called input-output analysis to break up the known total emissions of the world or a country into different industries and sectors, in the process taking account of how each industry consumes the goods and services of all the others. If we do this, and then divide by the total emissions of the auto industry by the total amount of money spent on new cars, we reach a footprint of 720kg CO2e per £1000 spent.

This is only a guideline figure, of course, as some cars may be more efficiently produced than others of the same price. But it's a reasonable ballpark estimate, and it suggests that cars have much bigger footprints than is traditionally believed. Producing a medium-sized new car costing £24,000 may generate more than 17 tonnes of CO2e – almost as much as three years' worth of gas and electricity in the typical UK home.

Interestingly, the input-outpout analysis suggests that the gas and electricity used by the auto industry itself, including all the component manufacturers as well as the assembly plant, accounts for less than 12% of the total. The rest is spread across everything from metal extraction (33%), rubber manufacture (3%) and the manufacture of tools and machines (5%) through to business travel and stationary for car company employees.

The upshot is that – despite common claims to contrary – the embodied emissions of a car typically rival the exhaust pipe emissions over its entire lifetime. Indeed, for each mile driven, the emissions from the manufacture of a top-of-the-range Land Rover Discovery that ends up being scrapped after 100,000 miles may be as much as four timeshigher than the tailpipe emissions of a Citroen C1.

With this in mind, unless you do very high mileage or have a real gas-guzzler, it generally makes sense to keep your old car for as long as it is reliable – and to look after it carefully to extend its life as long as possible. If you make a car last to 200,000 miles rather than 100,000, then the emissions for each mile the car does in its lifetime may drop by as much as 50%, as a result of getting more distance out of the initial manufacturing emissions.

When you do eventually replace your car, it obviouslty makes sense to do so with a light, simple and fuel-efficient model: that way you'll be limiting both the manufacturing and the exhaust-pipe emissions. But before you buy, look into car clubs, especially if you live in a city centre: you may save lots of money as well as reducing the number of cars that need to be produced.

Of course, the exact benefits of new versus old cars, diesel versus hybrids, car clubs versus owning, and so on, are different for each person. To find out the greenest choice for you, check out the new interactive greener car guide at Startuk.org.

I quite like the new rules that are coming in, for me its a win as my car will no longer require an M OT from the 20th May, so no tax no MOT costs and cheap insurance only downside is my current MOT runs out on the 7th May so its either take it for another test or get the motorbikes out. I know the car is safe as I check everything over regularly myself.
harlzter43 m ago

I quite like the new rules that are coming in, for me its a win as my car …I quite like the new rules that are coming in, for me its a win as my car will no longer require an M OT from the 20th May, so no tax no MOT costs and cheap insurance only downside is my current MOT runs out on the 7th May so its either take it for another test or get the motorbikes out. I know the car is safe as I check everything over regularly myself.


What's the reasons for that does it become a classic car I thought they already made them exempt.
MynameisM10 m ago

What's the reasons for that does it become a classic car I thought they …What's the reasons for that does it become a classic car I thought they already made them exempt.



Its under the revamped historic vehicles class, before it was just vehicles made before a certain fixed date (I think 1960 for MOT exemption and 76 for tax) its now going to be a rolling date to cover any car as soon as it becomes 40 years old unless its been substantially altered in the last 30 years so no monster V8's in a mini, unless it was done before 1988.
harlzter17 h, 36 m ago

Its under the revamped historic vehicles class, before it was just …Its under the revamped historic vehicles class, before it was just vehicles made before a certain fixed date (I think 1960 for MOT exemption and 76 for tax) its now going to be a rolling date to cover any car as soon as it becomes 40 years old unless its been substantially altered in the last 30 years so no monster V8's in a mini, unless it was done before 1988.


Think we’ll be seeing a lot more cortinas, cavaliers and montegos on the road then soon
118luke2 h, 33 m ago

Think we’ll be seeing a lot more cortinas, cavaliers and montegos on the r …Think we’ll be seeing a lot more cortinas, cavaliers and montegos on the road then soon



Doubt it, if they haven't been on the road for so long they will be too far gone to be driveable never mind road worthy especially Montegos, it would be like a jigsaw gluing the rust back together to resemble a car, too much will need replacing especially anything rubber, Cortinas fetch silly money anyway even as barn finds and will end up in enthusiasts hands and fully restored, too much would need spending on old cars for anyone wanting something cheap to avoid MOT's.

I can see the police taking an interest in classics once the exemption comes into play at least initially to send out a message that they still need to be roadworthy and safe (or as safe as they can be), mine has no reversing light and no number plate lights as is standard, I am going to be installing a reversing light anyway for my own peace of mind and at some point converting the drum brakes to a disc brake set up along the line, I've already replaced the 3 point fixed seatbelts in the front with inertia ones and added a 3rd brake light for visibility. Anything safety related is acceptable and doesn't affect classic value anyway. The body kit on mine was a common mod (more so stateside where it was available mail order - although I have never seen one in the flesh or for sale over here) in the early 80's so doesn't affect it as a major modification under the class of substantially altering the appearance as it was over 30 years ago. Although I wouldn't be too fussed if it wasn't exempt from MOT's myself.
May be of interest to some of you.

How many left.
Edited by: "richp" 7th Mar 2018
If anyone is still following this, there is a piece in Matters of Testing this week Why it's important to check for corrosion.

Also a news story to accompany the MOT rule changes.

I did say in one of my posts I didn't think that issuing a dangerous would stop your car from being driven away when the new rules come in place (as it is now you can drive it away with a dangerous) but now from May 20th it looks like you won't be able to drive it away if a dangerous is issued.
I've asked for clarification on this, because at the moment only a prohibition can stop a vehicle from being driven away & we don't issue these.

Below is a reply from DVSA to a question someone asked in the blog.

"Chris (DVSA) posted onon 20 March 2018

Hi Dave,

From 20th May 2018, the MOT will change. Defects will be classed as dangerous, major and minor. If a vehicle defect is categorised as dangerous or major it will fail its MOT.

If a defect is identified as being dangerous, the vehicle will not be allowed to be driven away from the MOT testing station.

Thanks,

Chris"

OK this has now been amended by DVSA, reply below:

Chris (DVSA) posted onon 20 March 2018

"Hi Dave,

From 20th May 2018, the MOT will change. Defects will be classed as dangerous, major and minor. If a vehicle defect is categorised as dangerous or major it will fail its MOT.

If a defect is identified as being dangerous, the vehicle should not be driven away from the MOT testing station.


Thanks,

Chris

Note: this has been amended to clarify the original comment. The MOT garage will have no authority to detain a vehicle."
Edited by: "richp" 21st Mar 2018
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