New 'Right to repair' Standards For Appliances Across The EU From 2021

10
Posted 1st Oct
We've all been there or at least know someone that has. You buy a new appliance and then right after the warranty is out... BAM! It breaks Then what happens is we begrudgingly hunt down a deal on a replacement, and condemn the old to the scrap yard. Seems a huge waste!

What is 'Right to Repair'?
Starting in 2021 firms will have to figure out a way of making their appliances last longer. How? By supplying spar parts for their products for upto 10 years.

What do the new rules apply to?
As far as we know, this will be be applicable to Washing machines, Fridges, dishwashers and lighting.

What about extended warranties?
It's not totally clear how this will affect extended warranties or their prices, although I suspect it will have some impact along the way. I guess we'll have to wait for more information to find out how the new rules change things up. If we see any more information that sheds more light on this, I'll get it updated.

What will the changes help with?
The new standards aim to help with the environment, as it should greatly cut carbon emissions. Aside from that being a huge help, I think the changes will make a lot of people very happy that they don't have to bin off a relatively new purchase, that will end up causing them to fork out again. So great news all round. right?!

Our appliances live longer, it reduces emissions and saves us buying over and over!




The following is from the BBC News Site - Source

"Under the European Commission's new standards, manufacturers will have to make spares, such as door gaskets and thermostats, available to professional repairers.

These parts will have to be accessible with commonly-available tools and without damaging the product"

"Campaigners say individual consumers should also be allowed to buy spares and mend their own machines. But manufacturers said this would raise questions about risk and liability."
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10 Comments
I have been advertising the "white goods forum" for best part of a decade! ..they already assist if you have the competence to perform a basic search, & tie in your brand, product code serial number & can competently describe your dilemma, as well as pointing you at correct spare part.
Factor in 10% extra on the price of anything you buy for a 5 year extended warranty.. they always end up paying for themselves.

Hi-Sense Fridge Price New £850, 5 Year Warranty £55.. 2 years 2 months after purchase ice machine broke, cost to fix was around £200.00 covered under warranty, still covered for further years

Belling cooker £500 new, £50 5 year warranty 18 months after purchase oven element broke, estimated £300 fix, warranty covered and again years left...

just a couple of examples of mine.
I thought you were covered anyway upto six years?

I know two people who have had Televisions fixed by Currys for free that were three years old, well past the 12 month warranty. I think they were asked to pay a small fee upfront, something under £100 but that would be refunded should the issue be found to be a manufacturing defect and not wear and tear.

Right to repair is all well and good but I can’t imagine manufacturers, or retailers for that matter stocking a huge spare parts inventory for every appliance range they sell for upto 10 years.It’s not practical.

Even if they did I imagine they’d only sell parts to certified repair agents and not the general public. Once you factor in the cost of the part and engineer to fit it on a 10 year old electric cooker (for example) I imagine the cost would be near enough the price of a new unit anyway. Utterly pointless in my opinion.
MrSprkle01/10/2019 12:57

Factor in 10% extra on the price of anything you buy for a 5 year extended …Factor in 10% extra on the price of anything you buy for a 5 year extended warranty.. they always end up paying for themselves. Hi-Sense Fridge Price New £850, 5 Year Warranty £55.. 2 years 2 months after purchase ice machine broke, cost to fix was around £200.00 covered under warranty, still covered for further yearsBelling cooker £500 new, £50 5 year warranty 18 months after purchase oven element broke, estimated £300 fix, warranty covered and again years left...just a couple of examples of mine.


Wow that a very expensive element, when they cost around £10 on eBay. admittedly the warranty firm have other costs but probably £5 parts and £295 labour for a five minute job?
HerefordCiderApples01/10/2019 14:22

Wow that a very expensive element, when they cost around £10 on eBay. …Wow that a very expensive element, when they cost around £10 on eBay. admittedly the warranty firm have other costs but probably £5 parts and £295 labour for a five minute job?


It's an example the induction unit could of gone that won't be £10 on ebay. And the cheapest element for my oven is coming in at £59.99 more than the warranty.. Also this is a genuine belling part and engineer.
Edited by: "MrSprkle" 1st Oct
freakstyler01/10/2019 14:11

I thought you were covered anyway upto six years?


You thought wrong.

You have up to six years to claim for an 'inherent' fault i.e there on day 1 of purchase. Under 6 months old its up to the retailer to prove the fault wasn't there on day 1, after 6 months is up to the customer to prove (via an engineers report) the fault has 'inherent', this can be difficlut years down the line.
paulj4801/10/2019 15:36

You thought wrong.You have up to six years to claim for an 'inherent' …You thought wrong.You have up to six years to claim for an 'inherent' fault i.e there on day 1 of purchase. Under 6 months old its up to the retailer to prove the fault wasn't there on day 1, after 6 months is up to the customer to prove (via an engineers report) the fault has 'inherent', this can be difficlut years down the line.



I did say manufacturing defect. Manufacturing defect and inherent fault are one and the same in my opinion.
freakstyler01/10/2019 16:11

I did say manufacturing defect. Manufacturing defect and inherent fault …I did say manufacturing defect. Manufacturing defect and inherent fault are one and the same in my opinion.



you failed to mention the hoops you may have to jump through to prove it though.
Watch the price tag go up.
Aah, the old 'up to'.
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