Non standard construction

19
Found 23rd Jun
I was wondering if anyone has any information or knowledge on non standard construction properties?

Im looking at purchasing my first property, we have found a 3 bed non standard construction but I’m unsure what type of construction this is.

I’m aware that the issues can be the break down of the steel but im unsure of how best to identify this.

We have had a large bank mortgage application denied due to the build. I’m wondering if this is because of a small crack on the outside of the building? Or maybe they can see something with the property that is faulty or of issue.

Our mortgage broker has advised that we apply elsewhere for a mortgage but we have to pay for the valuation and I don’t want to lose £200 without doing a little more research.

I’ve attached a link to the property and would really appreciate any advise, what to look for and what to avoid with this property.

Thanks guys!!

rightmove.co.uk/pro…x=0
Community Updates
Ask
19 Comments
I don't see any technical details from that link but is it a Prefab?
I think most lenders will not offer mortgages on non-standard construction houses (although I guess it may depend on the type of construction), regardless of the condition, so they are usually cheap and difficult to sell, but can to be popular with cash buyers intending to rent them out. I think skinning the building with outer brick built walls and layer of insulation might make it mortgageable, if it is economic to do.

A quick google finds:- onlinemortgageadvisor.co.uk/oth…on/
Edited by: "melted" 23rd Jun
There's an estate with this type of non-standard construction near me. I imagine the council must have built it in the 50’s/60’s. The council did clad a few of them in brick for aesthetic reasons and as far as I’m aware the majority are now privately owned. Most have been sold by auction and the estate agent details always state in bold lettering ‘Cash Purchasers Only’. Most lenders won’t touch them as in theory they can be dismantled and put up elsewhere in a space of a week. The steel panels themselves are not so much of a problem it’s the bolts that hold them all together that fail.
You’ve just got to remember with any property you look to buy it is also the resale value and the ease of selling that should also be taken into consideration as other buyers will have the same thoughts and problems with finance as you are currently experiencing plus the property would be xxxx amount older. Also there may be a problem highlighted on any EPC certificate as they are not well insulated and may need cavity wall insulation, which would be another expense. Oh, and when viewing see if the central heating pipe work runs around the skirting and up the walls etc rather than being hidden behind the plaster.
With all the negatives (except perhaps the price) I would walk away now and try and find something else that you can easily get a mortgage for.
Edited by: "Toptrumpet" 23rd Jun
Is the construction type on the homebuyers report? That would highlight any defects as well, such as the crack you mentioned if its a concern.

With non standard construction you'll run into some issues trying to insure it as well.
A couple of points 1 you can get a morgage on most of theses property s,they are like any other house if well maintained and looked after,external cladding is now used to create a cavity so they are well insulated if this has been done,We purchased ours several years ago for £24k Halifax morgage just had it valued by several estate agents £160k.They do make ideal rental propertys location is the most important factor like any property.So condition is key like any house if in a poor state investment will be needed the local houseing just externally clad all the metal framed property s and tested the frames out of several hundred built over 60 years ago there was 2 which needed work.There have been 6 sold near me in the last 3 months prices from £130k to £160k,so go ask about a morgage very good chance you will get 1.We live in 1 its like any other house we have had keep it well maintained its fine they have there quirks but all propertyss do.
Found a similar thread on MSE
I can see a council document for the area but it just says 1970's rendered. no details of construction type.
You really need to tell us what the construction type is.


14.8 Kenilworth Road South Character Area
Key Characteristics:
Size 9.5ha
Land Use
Residential
House Type
1970’s two storey terraces
Architecture
Features are similar throughout,
and include having flat-fronted front elevations,
single storey rear projections, a shallow pitched roof, and relatively small
windows.
Materials
Consistent palette of materials – most houses are rendered and painted a
range of colours. Roofs are constructed using concrete rooftiles.
Building Form
Regular rhythm of houses, with plot widths of 7m.
Building Line
Rows of houses create strong building lines
Plots
Front gardens tend to have a length of around 5m. Rear gardens are regular in
shape, and range between 5m and 10m in length.
Layout
Radburn layout, segregating cars from
pedestrians. Housing is arranged in
linear rows of terraces around a series of garage courts, open spaces and
footpaths.
Enclosure
Trees planted along the road create some enclosure; although streets are still
relatively open, with wide verges and in most cases, no pavement.
Parking
Most parking provided in garage courts and garages, with some on-street
parking.
Landscaping
The character area includes a number of green open spaces, which enhance
the openness of the area, and create a spacious setting for the dwellings.
Mature trees create a green backdrop to the area.
Density 35 dph
Other
Land slopes away to the west of the character area
That property is sold. But in general it depends on the type of construction and the lease or freehold of the property and how long you intend to stay their. We've looked at these properties because at our age we are not really looking for an investment just the right property. Some you can skim them which enables people to get mortages on them.
parsimony11 h, 39 m ago

I don't see any technical details from that link but is it a Prefab?


To be honest I’m not sure on the exact property type and was hoping someone with some experience would be able to identify it or see some similar features. The only details about the build of the property that I am
aware about is that it is a timber frame property so im assuming it’s held together with some kind of steel fixings?

Sorry I’m very new to these type of properties so trying to dig a little deeper before going forward with the purchase.

Thanks!
Toptrumpet11 h, 11 m ago

There's an estate with this type of non-standard construction near me. I …There's an estate with this type of non-standard construction near me. I imagine the council must have built it in the 50’s/60’s. The council did clad a few of them in brick for aesthetic reasons and as far as I’m aware the majority are now privately owned. Most have been sold by auction and the estate agent details always state in bold lettering ‘Cash Purchasers Only’. Most lenders won’t touch them as in theory they can be dismantled and put up elsewhere in a space of a week. The steel panels themselves are not so much of a problem it’s the bolts that hold them all together that fail.You’ve just got to remember with any property you look to buy it is also the resale value and the ease of selling that should also be taken into consideration as other buyers will have the same thoughts and problems with finance as you are currently experiencing plus the property would be xxxx amount older. Also there may be a problem highlighted on any EPC certificate as they are not well insulated and may need cavity wall insulation, which would be another expense. Oh, and when viewing see if the central heating pipe work runs around the skirting and up the walls etc rather than being hidden behind the plaster.With all the negatives (except perhaps the price) I would walk away now and try and find something else that you can easily get a mortgage for.


Oh some brilliant points to consider here. Much appreciated!!

As far as I am aware these houses were built to house people who lost their houses in the blitz. They were so easy and quick to assemble but obviously now the issues are starting to become more known by lenders.

One of my biggest concerns is reselling the property. I was hoping there would be something that we could do to the property to make it morgagable when we resell, such a re rendering or cavity insulation etc.

Thanks!
Toptrumpet11 h, 25 m ago

There's an estate with this type of non-standard construction near me. I …There's an estate with this type of non-standard construction near me. I imagine the council must have built it in the 50’s/60’s. The council did clad a few of them in brick for aesthetic reasons and as far as I’m aware the majority are now privately owned. Most have been sold by auction and the estate agent details always state in bold lettering ‘Cash Purchasers Only’. Most lenders won’t touch them as in theory they can be dismantled and put up elsewhere in a space of a week. The steel panels themselves are not so much of a problem it’s the bolts that hold them all together that fail.You’ve just got to remember with any property you look to buy it is also the resale value and the ease of selling that should also be taken into consideration as other buyers will have the same thoughts and problems with finance as you are currently experiencing plus the property would be xxxx amount older. Also there may be a problem highlighted on any EPC certificate as they are not well insulated and may need cavity wall insulation, which would be another expense. Oh, and when viewing see if the central heating pipe work runs around the skirting and up the walls etc rather than being hidden behind the plaster.With all the negatives (except perhaps the price) I would walk away now and try and find something else that you can easily get a mortgage for.


I think you are spot on with saying that the resale needs to be considered and to be honest that’s probably my biggest concern right now. I think if there are some steps we can take as homeowners to make the property more mortgageable we are happy to do so. For example a report or survey on the steel framework and re skimming of the property.

The central heating pipes are all external which is probably a good thing as they are accesssible. i have definitely noticed the EPC certificate is affected by the type of build but this isnt a huge concern for me.

Its a tough one for us as there isn’t much on the market within our budget and this is a feasible property that we could stay in long term. The other properties in our area are smaller and we will outgrow fairly quickly but on the same hand I don’t want to buy it for this reason.

Thanks for your honest reply, much appreciated
MichyM10 h, 39 m ago

Is the construction type on the homebuyers report? That would highlight …Is the construction type on the homebuyers report? That would highlight any defects as well, such as the crack you mentioned if its a concern.With non standard construction you'll run into some issues trying to insure it as well.


Unfortunately we do not want to pay out for the homebuyers report until we have been offered a mortgage on the property.

The only thing that has been carried out so far is a valuation on the property. As the valuation was carried out by the lender (Santander) they wouldn’t let us see the valuation notes so we do not know the details about the construction of the property nor do we know what notes were on the valuation that have stopped the bank lending on that property. It’s a bit of a frustrating situation really.

The next lender we go with charge for a valuation but that means we will have access to the valuation report one way or another which will be helpful and like you say show up any issues.

We are looking into insurance as we speak so that will definitely have an influence on our decision.

Thanks for your reply, Iappreciate the good points you mention
jasbos10 h, 40 m ago

A couple of points 1 you can get a morgage on most of theses property …A couple of points 1 you can get a morgage on most of theses property s,they are like any other house if well maintained and looked after,external cladding is now used to create a cavity so they are well insulated if this has been done,We purchased ours several years ago for £24k Halifax morgage just had it valued by several estate agents £160k.They do make ideal rental propertys location is the most important factor like any property.So condition is key like any house if in a poor state investment will be needed the local houseing just externally clad all the metal framed property s and tested the frames out of several hundred built over 60 years ago there was 2 which needed work.There have been 6 sold near me in the last 3 months prices from £130k to £160k,so go ask about a morgage very good chance you will get 1.We live in 1 its like any other house we have had keep it well maintained its fine they have there quirks but all propertyss do.


Oh this is good to know. We may try another lender and go from there. I’m just interested to see what issues we may run into if we were to buy the property.
Thanks for your fab reply
mas9910 h, 4 m ago

I can see a council document for the area but it just says 1970's …I can see a council document for the area but it just says 1970's rendered. no details of construction type.You really need to tell us what the construction type is.14.8 Kenilworth Road South Character Area Key Characteristics: Size 9.5ha Land Use Residential House Type 1970’s two storey terraces Architecture Features are similar throughout, and include having flat-fronted front elevations, single storey rear projections, a shallow pitched roof, and relatively small windows. Materials Consistent palette of materials – most houses are rendered and painted a range of colours. Roofs are constructed using concrete rooftiles. Building Form Regular rhythm of houses, with plot widths of 7m. Building Line Rows of houses create strong building lines Plots Front gardens tend to have a length of around 5m. Rear gardens are regular in shape, and range between 5m and 10m in length. Layout Radburn layout, segregating cars from pedestrians. Housing is arranged in linear rows of terraces around a series of garage courts, open spaces and footpaths. Enclosure Trees planted along the road create some enclosure; although streets are still relatively open, with wide verges and in most cases, no pavement. Parking Most parking provided in garage courts and garages, with some on-street parking. Landscaping The character area includes a number of green open spaces, which enhance the openness of the area, and create a spacious setting for the dwellings. Mature trees create a green backdrop to the area. Density 35 dph Other Land slopes away to the west of the character area


Awesome, thanks for this info. Good to know.

Unfortunately I’m not sure on the exact property type and was hoping someone with some experience would be able to identify it or see some similar features. The only details about the build of the property that I am aware about is that it is a timber frame property so im assuming it’s held together with steel fixtures
4TheManyNotTheFew23rd Jun

That property is sold. But in general it depends on the type of …That property is sold. But in general it depends on the type of construction and the lease or freehold of the property and how long you intend to stay their. We've looked at these properties because at our age we are not really looking for an investment just the right property. Some you can skim them which enables people to get mortages on them.


The property is sold STC as our offer on the property has been accepted.
Its a freehold property and it will be a first time home for us so not something we intend on living in forever. Do you think we should give it a miss?
Happy to maintain it and reskim it if this will help with the resale of the property. Happy to csrry our any maintainance if this helps resell, as long as it’s not too costly.
If this was built in the 70's for the LA, there's a few possibilities :
Peter Barry: Non traditional construction
1. Timber framed, polythene membrane, usually ply clad with a decorative over clad but sometimes builder cut corners and ommitted ply
Basic construction is the similar as many new housing estates but these now have a non structural brick or render outer,
2. Poured concrete, referred to as " Wimpey no fines". No cavity as such, that being provide internally by the internal wall studding. Wiki Wimpey no fines
gemma.megone10 h, 26 m ago

The property is sold STC as our offer on the property has been accepted. …The property is sold STC as our offer on the property has been accepted. Its a freehold property and it will be a first time home for us so not something we intend on living in forever. Do you think we should give it a miss?Happy to maintain it and reskim it if this will help with the resale of the property. Happy to csrry our any maintainance if this helps resell, as long as it’s not too costly.



That's a decision for you really, I can only say as an investment it won't go up in value like stand houses and might be harder to sell. But if it fills your needs and is in good order why not. I would suggest you get a proper survey if you go forward and also check the other houses around to see if they have been skimmed it might not be sensible as it does cost a lot of money I've been quoted £25k in the past. But, if you didn't know it was NSC and you don't fully understand the implications it might be best to walk away as it will always be on your mind - if you are not in love with it and can find better.


Just remembered many years ago we pulled out of a NSC house on the advise of the surveyor.
Edited by: "4TheManyNotTheFew" 24th Jun
Have you asked the current owners what they know? Tell them that the mortgage companies are reluctant to lend and try to get info from them - even the name of the original builder.

Pipework etc surface mounted implies cast concrete to me.

The problem with the concrete prefab/cast in situ stuff is that they are very variable in quality - some seem fine others are falling to bits.
Fixing them seems to be expensive - to the extent of pretty much rebuilding the house. And that applies as well to some of the badly built timber frame houses that are rotting.

Your issue is that a proper investigation is destructive - they need to make holes to check things.
Post a comment
Avatar
@
    Text

    Top Discussions

    Top Merchants