Online Grocery Shop

37
Posted 30th Mar
Ok so we are a family of 4 adults and we did not panic buy and now we are running out of food, neither one of us want to step outside, not even the drive or garden. Anxiety has kicked up a gear.

We live in East London, which place would be best to do an online shop?

Never done an online shop before!

And how are people’s experiences with their orders? Deliveries? Any cancellations? Did you get what you want?

Thanks
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Go to a shop it’s not resident evil yet.
_Whatever_30/03/2020 13:54

Go to a shop it’s not resident evil yet.


Quite right, its more The Walking Dead.
ST312330/03/2020 14:14

I completely understand you not wanting to venture out. Social distancing …I completely understand you not wanting to venture out. Social distancing isn't a fool proof way of avoiding the virus. Only takes one person either deliberately ignoring it or even not understanding the rules etc and you potentially have it. I think there has been far more spread of the virus than publicised via supermarkets. Yes social distancing might reduce it but won't eliminate it. If this waste of space government was really serious about making lock down work (but lets face it they haven't been serious about anything since this virus started in China) they would send weekly essential food boxes to everyone (not just vulnerable) so no one HAD to go out. It's a truly horrible situation being forced to go out for shopping in the current climate. Supermarkets too should take some of the blame, they have known for several weeks now how demand would increase yet I see no action to deal with it. If anything they seem to be scaling back online delivery options and restricting their availability practically forcing those who aren't vulnerable (and even some who are) to go out for food...


I can confirm this is not the case at all. As a trainer for Sainsburys we are in an industry set up for 7% year on year growth now desperatly trying to achieve 40% growth in 3 weeks. Naturally there is not this pool of people fully incorporated into the business and trained ready to go. Nor is there the equipment such as shopper trolleys (online ones not customer ones) not to mention the inability to magic up many hundreds of additional rerfrigerated vans from mercedes (at a time when other companies are requesting the same). In a normal week i have the capacity to train around 6 new drivers a week. Through tweaks and streamlining of our training offer this has increased to 15 drivers a week. (we are a team of 23 trainers increasing to 26) We have also in line with social distancing moving our training to video call and theoretical process training in the department instead of on road so that drivers dont buddy up. We are hugely ramping up the number of orders and slots available. Mostly this is through click and collect. I hope your answer is through lack of knowledge rather than anything more mean spirited as i know our business and industry is trying incredibly hard to increase capacity at a time where 10-15% of our workforce are themselves not available. Unrealistic to expect the supermarkets to move their entire operations from about 8-25% online (depending on size of online department) to 100% in 3 weeks. Ocado actually only do online with no store footprint and again will be unable to double their capacity in under a month. Not a snide comment just pointing out the challenges of transforming shopping beyond what could possibly have been forseen 5 weeks ago. Shops are shops not the government they didnt decide this course of action and in fact are making changes and updates daily to protect everyone. We are already hugely limiting the amount of customers that are allowed in at a time. Largely we have removed cash. Introduced spit guards etc. Spaced out checkouts with tape. Difficult in a free world to decide how close people will stand outside to que up. I agree it would be safer to not have a shop and only do online but your asking a horse not to be a horse.
Edited by: "JamieBeveridge" 30th Mar
37 Comments
Could try Amazon Prime Now, if you have Prime.
Basically.. sign up to any that'll deliver in your area and keep checking for delivery slots. Odds are you won't be able to get a slot unless you've someone in the vulnerable list and you'll have to take the chance venturing out with the rest of us for essentials
you can't get an online delivery any more as too many people want online delivery now. some supermarkets are reserving online delieveries for the vulnerable only.

some people said they could still get iceland delieveries.
Avatar
deleted193929
A lot of places have limits on products (2/3 of each).
I did an Iceland shop just now, 40% of the store seems out of stock though.
There were, however, free slots all through the day (although this is subject to area).
I've managed to get 2 online slots this week for the 31st and the 1st just check every day
A viable alternative at the 11th hour (in my part of London).

Don't forget many ethnic shops are hard working. "Mr. Patel cornershop" types ,with help of "bros and sis" ,do deliver provisions quickly with a certain min. spend. Then after, at the same time, you can do a bigger shop elsewhere.
I honestly think someone will have to make a trip out the house, delivery slots online are almost impossible to come across. Iceland can still offer same day delivery (in a lot of places) if someone will go in there for you and do the actual shop instore first. They can then just give your address to deliver it to, just make sure they ask at the checkout first to check when they can deliver.
You can still shop, just take precautions. Shopping is now a pain in the arse with social distancing but its got to be done. Keep a pair of gloves by the door, put them on when you leave the house and take them off when you enter the house (put the gloves in a bag and out of reach from family or if disposable just chuck them in the bin). Wash your hands with soap and hot water and that's it, its all I do and its more than a lot of people do. Simple, easy precautions.
Maas bazaar
East London food centre, seelans superstore
deleted19392930/03/2020 12:57

A lot of places have limits on products (2/3 of each).I did an Iceland …A lot of places have limits on products (2/3 of each).I did an Iceland shop just now, 40% of the store seems out of stock though.There were, however, free slots all through the day (although this is subject to area).


Not sure if it's nationwide or varies from town to town but Iceland are "temporarily limiting online orders to customers who are over state pension age, self-isolating and other vulnerable people, such as the disabled" here.
you need to start searching now for local volunteer community groups, just in case you might need them. for example
eastlondonadvertiser.co.uk/new…727
Go to a shop it’s not resident evil yet.
I completely understand you not wanting to venture out. Social distancing isn't a fool proof way of avoiding the virus. Only takes one person either deliberately ignoring it or even not understanding the rules etc and you potentially have it. I think there has been far more spread of the virus than publicised via supermarkets. Yes social distancing might reduce it but won't eliminate it.

If this waste of space government was really serious about making lock down work (but lets face it they haven't been serious about anything since this virus started in China) they would send weekly essential food boxes to everyone (not just vulnerable) so no one HAD to go out.

It's a truly horrible situation being forced to go out for shopping in the current climate. Supermarkets too should take some of the blame, they have known for several weeks now how demand would increase yet I see no action to deal with it. If anything they seem to be scaling back online delivery options and restricting their availability practically forcing those who aren't vulnerable (and even some who are) to go out for food...
It is difficult to book deliveries even for highly vulnerable people like my father, who is in his 80s and has been waiting months for treatment to resolve a condition that leaves him short of breath.

At least bulk buying and overcrowded supermarkets are starting to be tackled.

Maybe you could pay a volunteer to do you shopping for you.
Check on your local Facebook groups. Lots of independant shops near me are offering delivery, such as local butchers, greengrocers, hardware stores and corner shop type mini supermarkets.
Avatar
deleted193929
I'm a big user of eggs as I mostly follow a ketogenic lifestyle.

All the major supermarkets seem to be struggling to get them in.

So, I started sourcing local farms near me, it helps the local economy, they are cheaper and plentyful.
deleted19392930/03/2020 15:05

I'm a big user of eggs as I mostly follow a ketogenic lifestyle. All the …I'm a big user of eggs as I mostly follow a ketogenic lifestyle. All the major supermarkets seem to be struggling to get them in.So, I started sourcing local farms near me, it helps the local economy, they are cheaper and plentyful.


One near me sells hens too, and I think they might also have feed. So could have eggs for a few weeks and then chicken dinner.
_Whatever_30/03/2020 13:54

Go to a shop it’s not resident evil yet.


Quite right, its more The Walking Dead.
deleted19392930/03/2020 15:05

I'm a big user of eggs as I mostly follow a ketogenic lifestyle. All the …I'm a big user of eggs as I mostly follow a ketogenic lifestyle. All the major supermarkets seem to be struggling to get them in.So, I started sourcing local farms near me, it helps the local economy, they are cheaper and plentyful.


In my town twas the same, however I sometimes shop in a local eco shop for fresh produce (that many walk by) and they had loads of eggs. Maybe not cheaper but fresher for sure.
Bushes30/03/2020 15:34

Quite right, its more The Walking Dead.


The walking idiots
You need to get with reality a bit. We all have to go out shopping, but we can minimise the impact of catching the virus by being careful. Shops have a queue of 2 metres when outside waiting to get in, and they don't allow many inside, and one person per till. They're people putting them self in far more dangerous situations then that.
Edited by: "Trick1" 30th Mar
The person/staff who was handing over click and collect groceries last time was coughing profusely as she walked towards the click and collect van where items were kept. She had no mask on.
Edited by: "sydney2" 30th Mar
OP, unless all of you are in the vulnerable / susceptible category, there is no reason why one of you can't go out on shop. Follow distancing guidelines and wash your hands as soon as you get home before touching anything else.

For the last 10-12 days, I have been getting almost everything we need at home; even toilet paper is in stock. Yes, you may need to 2-3 trips initially to stock up for a week (and go when the store opens) given the purchase limits but after that, if you match what you consume with the limits, you may end up going to the store maybe twice a week. I have a large Sainsburys near by which helps plus a Waitrose across the road from it. In fact, I am now seeing a lot of fresh fruit & veggies being reduced to silly prices in Waitrose on the "best before" date, probably because consumption has dropped or they ordered too much.
ST312330/03/2020 14:14

I completely understand you not wanting to venture out. Social distancing …I completely understand you not wanting to venture out. Social distancing isn't a fool proof way of avoiding the virus. Only takes one person either deliberately ignoring it or even not understanding the rules etc and you potentially have it. I think there has been far more spread of the virus than publicised via supermarkets. Yes social distancing might reduce it but won't eliminate it. If this waste of space government was really serious about making lock down work (but lets face it they haven't been serious about anything since this virus started in China) they would send weekly essential food boxes to everyone (not just vulnerable) so no one HAD to go out. It's a truly horrible situation being forced to go out for shopping in the current climate. Supermarkets too should take some of the blame, they have known for several weeks now how demand would increase yet I see no action to deal with it. If anything they seem to be scaling back online delivery options and restricting their availability practically forcing those who aren't vulnerable (and even some who are) to go out for food...


Have you considered the reality that delivery drivers may be isolating thus impacting capacity? It is quite easy to blame the stores.
Don't risk it.

Social distancing don't work in supermarkets unless your queuing for the tills.
Not all shoppers and staff are wearing masks/gloves so go with care.

If you do go, strip in the hallway shower and immediately was the clothes.
rimalpatel00730/03/2020 20:56

Don't risk it. Social distancing don't work in supermarkets unless your …Don't risk it. Social distancing don't work in supermarkets unless your queuing for the tills. Not all shoppers and staff are wearing masks/gloves so go with care. If you do go, strip in the hallway shower and immediately was the clothes.


You serious?
bozo00730/03/2020 21:25

You serious?


To which part, to all, then yes.

Love to hear your objections
It's easy to sign up with all the big stores like Tesco etc but getting a delivery slot can mean a wait. If you've never shopped online, just go to the store website and look for the log in tab. You will get the option to open an account. Then you can click on the home delivery button, and then the calendar. New dates are released all the time, you just need to be quick/lucky to get what you want. Morrisons for instance have increased their deliveries, so I got one booked today (for the 12th of April, first available). You can leapfrog dates perhaps, by looking for the next available slot, even if it's a couple of weeks on. Smaller convenience stores like the Co-op, Supersavers, Costcutters etc even farm shops can offer delivery. Our local bakery does a next day delivery. I suggest you have a look for local shops and local facebook groups, where you may well get advice. Be aware there are a few reports of scammers offering to get your shopping, then ....not, so go with someone you know or are recommended first. You need to tell people you are self isolating, put a sign on the door perhaps, then you can collect from the doorstep. You can use gloves or paper to handle the bags/boxes, or sanitise the sh*t out of them, then decant things into clean containers. Leave hard containers like tins or plastic for as long as possible, as the virus lives on hard surfaces for something like 72 hours. Wash your gate/door handles and doorbell/letterbox. I know this sounds like the paranoiacs guide to self preservation, but you sound worried, and quite frankly so am I. Good luck.
ST312330/03/2020 14:14

I completely understand you not wanting to venture out. Social distancing …I completely understand you not wanting to venture out. Social distancing isn't a fool proof way of avoiding the virus. Only takes one person either deliberately ignoring it or even not understanding the rules etc and you potentially have it. I think there has been far more spread of the virus than publicised via supermarkets. Yes social distancing might reduce it but won't eliminate it. If this waste of space government was really serious about making lock down work (but lets face it they haven't been serious about anything since this virus started in China) they would send weekly essential food boxes to everyone (not just vulnerable) so no one HAD to go out. It's a truly horrible situation being forced to go out for shopping in the current climate. Supermarkets too should take some of the blame, they have known for several weeks now how demand would increase yet I see no action to deal with it. If anything they seem to be scaling back online delivery options and restricting their availability practically forcing those who aren't vulnerable (and even some who are) to go out for food...


I can confirm this is not the case at all. As a trainer for Sainsburys we are in an industry set up for 7% year on year growth now desperatly trying to achieve 40% growth in 3 weeks. Naturally there is not this pool of people fully incorporated into the business and trained ready to go. Nor is there the equipment such as shopper trolleys (online ones not customer ones) not to mention the inability to magic up many hundreds of additional rerfrigerated vans from mercedes (at a time when other companies are requesting the same). In a normal week i have the capacity to train around 6 new drivers a week. Through tweaks and streamlining of our training offer this has increased to 15 drivers a week. (we are a team of 23 trainers increasing to 26) We have also in line with social distancing moving our training to video call and theoretical process training in the department instead of on road so that drivers dont buddy up. We are hugely ramping up the number of orders and slots available. Mostly this is through click and collect. I hope your answer is through lack of knowledge rather than anything more mean spirited as i know our business and industry is trying incredibly hard to increase capacity at a time where 10-15% of our workforce are themselves not available. Unrealistic to expect the supermarkets to move their entire operations from about 8-25% online (depending on size of online department) to 100% in 3 weeks. Ocado actually only do online with no store footprint and again will be unable to double their capacity in under a month. Not a snide comment just pointing out the challenges of transforming shopping beyond what could possibly have been forseen 5 weeks ago. Shops are shops not the government they didnt decide this course of action and in fact are making changes and updates daily to protect everyone. We are already hugely limiting the amount of customers that are allowed in at a time. Largely we have removed cash. Introduced spit guards etc. Spaced out checkouts with tape. Difficult in a free world to decide how close people will stand outside to que up. I agree it would be safer to not have a shop and only do online but your asking a horse not to be a horse.
Edited by: "JamieBeveridge" 30th Mar
rimalpatel00730/03/2020 21:31

To which part, to all, then yes.Love to hear your objections


If you think a flu pandemic requires such severe precautions, then either you are extremely vulnerable to it or just excessively paranoid. If a shower is required and clothes need to be washed just for stepping out for groceries, then frankly, you might as well not step out at all and live life inside a bubble.

This recommendation reminds me of the thread started by someone couple of days ago asking if the windy conditions required an even greater isolation distance because the virus could potentially go further. All I will say is that the cure cannot be even worse than the problem and given that I am quite healthy, I will choose the discomfort of a flu (with isolation) than kill myself trying to prevent it.
bozo00730/03/2020 22:32

If you think a flu pandemic requires such severe precautions, then either …If you think a flu pandemic requires such severe precautions, then either you are extremely vulnerable to it or just excessively paranoid. If a shower is required and clothes need to be washed just for stepping out for groceries, then frankly, you might as well not step out at all and live life inside a bubble.This recommendation reminds me of the thread started by someone couple of days ago asking if the windy conditions required an even greater isolation distance because the virus could potentially go further. All I will say is that the cure cannot be even worse than the problem and given that I am quite healthy, I will choose the discomfort of a flu (with isolation) than kill myself trying to prevent it.


I think you missed the point.
Shower is not required but no harm in having one.
Ask yourself what's more important your health or what could/will happen next.
Big supermarkets are a nightmare. I found that smaller and independent stores are better stocked and no queues to get in. Tried 2 Tesco yesterday both with hour long queues. Shopped at Nisa Indy, B&M, Iceland (surprisingly good for fresh veg) and Lidl. Got everything inside 2 hours. Washed hands, Job done.
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