Out of warranty appliances. Are still covered for up to 6 years!

28
Posted 16th Nov
Just passing on some important information for those that don't already know. You can still claim for repair or part refund on an appliance which is outside it's 1 year or more warranty. For up to 6 years!

I did, in the back of my mind, think there was some law that stated under the sale of goods act, fit for purpose blah blah blah. But our tumble dryer has just packed up, it's 17 months old, so I did some research, and discovered I was partly correct!

Goods purchased prior to 1st October 2015, are covered under the Sale of Goods Act, after 2015 onwards it's called the Consumer Rights Act, fit for purpose rules. Which in a nutshell states that the RETAILER, NOT the manufacturer is responsible for goods that develop a fault even if out of warranty, and for up to 6 years.

I initially phoned Beko, and they rightly told me to ring Currys. I phoned Currys expecting to have a big fight, but as soon as I said, "it's out of warranty I know, but under the Consumer Rights Act....". She immediately said "yes I'll fill out a claim form for you, and someone will get back to you within 7 working days time, either to discuss a repair or a partial refund".

Obviously a full refund would be preferred but they don't have to offer that, so realistically it's unlikely.

So, don't just assume if something is out of warranty, your stuffed! Not so my friend. More details can be found here.
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So is this if its purchased after or before 2015 may I ask?
It is common knowledge since your parents days that the warranties, guarantees were and are extra to the consumer protection in law, just ask your mum and dad, the magic phrase is "fit for purpose", since 1893 and subsequent enactments.

Businesses like John Lewis do not dishonour and disrespect the basic human rights as enshrined in law for consumer for decades.
What you said, "...but under the Consumer Rights Act....". She immediately said "yes ...", is typical British leadership in some quarters, dis the customers who voted with their feet for your shop first. If the customer didn't know all the facts, then they did not know what they bought when they did. They would have to buy again.
Edited by: "splender" 16th Nov
deals6916/11/2019 15:31

So is this if its purchased after or before 2015 may I ask?


Both. Prior to 1st October 2015 it's covered under Sale of Goods Act, after that it's covered under Consumer Rights Act.
MikeCumbria16/11/2019 15:42

Both. Prior to 1st October 2015 it's covered under Sale of Goods Act, …Both. Prior to 1st October 2015 it's covered under Sale of Goods Act, after that it's covered under Consumer Rights Act.


Ohh thanks very much sounds good. 1 year after it ends right?
deals6916/11/2019 15:44

Ohh thanks very much sounds good. 1 year after it ends right?


Up to 6 years from purchase.
MikeCumbria16/11/2019 15:45

Up to 6 years from purchase.


Ohh nice. Will phone dyson as I had a problem 3 months after oy finished
deals6916/11/2019 15:45

Ohh nice. Will phone dyson as I had a problem 3 months after oy finished


You ring the RETAILER, ie the store you bought it from. Let us know how you get on!

Btw your probably better with a Henry vacuum anyway, great suction and no annoying filters to constantly clean/unclog, 30 foot power cable, and all for around £90/120!
Edited by: "MikeCumbria" 16th Nov
MikeCumbria16/11/2019 15:47

You ring the RETAILER, ie the store you bought it from. Let us know how …You ring the RETAILER, ie the store you bought it from. Let us know how you get on!Btw your probably better with a Henry vacuum anyway, great suction and no annoying filters to constantly clean/unclog, 30 foot power cable, and all for around £90/120!


Yup sounds good will let my parents know
MikeCumbria16/11/2019 15:42

Out of warranty appliance. Are still covered for up to 6 years!


I believe you have up to 6 years to make a claim which is siginificantly different to having 6 years (inferred) warranty. After any voluntary manufacturer warranty has expired and after 6 months since purchase it is up to the purchaser to show that the item was either faulty from the date of purchase or the item was not of comensurate durability compared to price paid (typically requiring an independent report funded by purchaser).
Happy to stand corrected if that is not a reasonable interpretation of current regs
AndyRoyd16/11/2019 16:06

I believe you have up to 6 years to make a claim which is siginificantly …I believe you have up to 6 years to make a claim which is siginificantly different to having 6 years (inferred) warranty. After any voluntary manufacturer warranty has expired and after 6 months since purchase it is up to the purchaser to show that the item was either faulty from the date of purchase or the item was not of comensurate durability compared to price paid (typically requiring an independent report funded by purchaser).Happy to stand corrected if that is not a reasonable interpretation of current regs


Yes they could say that, but in my case, as soon as the phrase Consumer Rights Act was mentioned, without any further discussion they were happy to say a repair or part refund would be confirmed to me by telephone within 7 working days, probably sooner.

No doubt other less reputable retailers will quibble, refuse, argue etc. You may have to technically get your own repair/report done and take a retailer to small claims court, but they could also technically try to be shady during a warranty period and you'd need to do the same.

The legislation/law isn't an automatic 6 year warranty on all electrical products. More specifically it's saying that goods should be fit for purpose and last a reasonable amount of time, which means just because you're out of your warranty period you shouldn't just expect if your household appliance in my case, gives up, that you'd just have to lump it. It's really saying that it would be reasonable for it to last up to 6 years from your purchase date, and that retailers have a legal obligation to repair or partially refund you in most cases, if your product doesn't last.
Edited by: "MikeCumbria" 16th Nov
MikeCumbria16/11/2019 16:19

Yes they could say that, but in my case, as soon as the phrase Consumer …Yes they could say that, but in my case, as soon as the phrase Consumer Rights Act was mentioned, without any further discussion they were happy to say a repair or part refund would be confirmed to me by telephone within 7 working days, probably sooner.No doubt other less reputable retailers will quibble, refuse, argue etc. You may have to technically get your own repair/report done and take a retailer to small claims court, but they could also technically try to be shady during a warranty period and you'd need to do the same.The legislation/law isn't an automatic 6 year warranty on all electrical products. More specifically it's saying that goods should be fit for purpose and last a reasonable amount of time, which means just because you're out of your warranty period you shouldn't just expect if your household appliance in my case, gives up, that you'd just have to lump it. It's really saying that it would be reasonable for it to last up to 6 years from your purchase date, and that retailers have a legal obligation to repair or partially refund you in most cases, if your product doesn't last.


Pls let us know what do they offer (full or part refund...).
I wouldn't be throwing praises at Currys just yet, lets see if they actually stick to their word and after having numerous bad experiences with PC world/Currys I wouldn't mind betting your comments in a few weeks change for the worst.
Edited by: "porsche911turbo" 16th Nov
MikeCumbria16/11/2019 16:19

Yes they could say that, but in my case, as soon as the words Consumer …Yes they could say that, but in my case, as soon as the words Consumer Rights Act was mentioned, without any further discussion they were happy to confirm repair or part refund would be confirmed to be by telephone within 7 working days, probably sooner.No doubt other less reputable retailers will quibble, refuse, argue etc. You may have to technically get your own repair/report done and take a retailer to small claims court, but they could also technically try to be shady during a warranty period and you'd need to do the same.The legislation/law isn't an automatic 6 year warranty on all electrical products. More specifically it's saying that goods should be fit for purpose and last a reasonable amount of time, which means just because you're out of your warranty period you shouldn't just expect if your household appliance in my case, gives up, that you'd just have to lump it. It's really saying that it would be reasonable for it to last up to 6 years from your purchase date.


I'd wait to see what, if anything, is offered prior to making assumption that something worthwhile will def be offered. The concept that the legal system will support an expectation that everything should last up to 6 years is optimisic, and anything that didn't last 6 years may likely involve further cost to prove why the cusumer believes it should have 6yrs longevity. But yes, an initial nudge to any merchant so see what is potentially offered to compensate for implied premature failure may be worth the effort, but enforcing anything beyond that may not be as plain sailing as the title of this thread implies.
user201616/11/2019 16:31

Pls let us know what do they offer (full or part refund...).


Yeah, I will do. Tbf the Beko tumble dryer is actually really good. I'd rather they repaired it then go through the hassle of arguing about a partial refund.
AndyRoyd16/11/2019 16:39

I'd wait to see what, if anything, is offered prior to making assumption …I'd wait to see what, if anything, is offered prior to making assumption that something worthwhile will def be offered. The concept that the legal system will support an expectation that everything should last up to 6 years is optimisic, and anything that didn't last 6 years may likely involve further cost to prove why the cusumer believes it should have 6yrs longevity. But yes, an initial nudge to any merchant so see what is potentially offered to compensate for implied premature failure may be worth the effort, but enforcing anything beyond that may not be as plain sailing as the title of this thread implies.


Oohh I'm not counting my chickens yet. Although Beko asked me who I bought it from, when I mentioned the Consumer Rights Act, and they said, "oh Currys, you'll probably be okay then".

Hopefully in a week it will be on its way to being resolved.
MikeCumbria16/11/2019 16:19

...The legislation/law isn't an automatic 6 year warranty on all …...The legislation/law isn't an automatic 6 year warranty on all electrical products...


which implies the current title of this thread is misleading and may be better worded to something similar to "UK merchants have obligations to compensate for premature failure of equipment for up to 6 years after purchase". Possibly extending OP text to include reference to worldwide merchants if S75 conditions are met.
mirror.co.uk/mon…685

telegraph.co.uk/fin…tml
"Despite this, there is some truth in the six-year rule idea. The Sale of Goods Act 1979 – now the Consumer Rights Act 2015 – provides that consumers are entitled to a repair or replacement or refund where goods are faulty.

If the fault occurs after six months, the consumer has to prove that the problem was down to a fault or issue at the manufacturer, as opposed to wear and tear or misuse.

In accordance with a law known as the Statutes of Limitations, consumers have this right for six years in England and for five years in Scotland."
Edited by: "cecilmcroberts" 16th Nov
My mates tele broke but he took an extended warranty out with Currys, they fixed it and did an absolutely shocking job, one wire was hanging out the back. They tried blaming my mate, terrible service from them
Any updates?
Yeah, update is they say it's not economically viable to repair, based on my fault description etc, so a partial refund is whats offered, and I've accepted. It's £107.97 which apparently is calculated by using Consumer Rights Act and trading standards calculations. My tumble dryer is 17 months old as I said, originally cost £229.99.

Bearing in mind it's out of warranty, £108 is lower than I'd like, but better than a kick in the teeth.

They initially offered me a Currys credit, but I asked for a cash refund, and they swiftly agreed. Now I need to decide on a fixed price repair or on putting the money towards another machine! If I go the repair route, it's finding someone that will do it.

There's a company called repaircare online, they charge a fixed fee of £99, no fee if they can't repair, but their reviews are pretty bad.

Beko want £125 to repair it, but after a little digging they finally confessed that might not be the final price, and they would possibly still charge a call out fee if they couldn't repair it!

With regard to the Consumer Rights Act, I'm pretty pleased to be getting a £108 back at least. Plenty of people outside their warranty period no doubt, don't realise they can still claim using the act. Hopefully this thread will give others hope they can at least getting something back.

My own opinion is that the claim should really be against the manufacturer rather than the retailer. This would seem fairer to me. It's not really the retailers fault if an appliance doesn't last, that's more likely a manufacturer problem.

Anyway I'm off to look for a repair engineer, as the tumble dryer has been a decent machine up until this fault and it's seems rather unnecessary just to throw it away. Fingers crossed I can find somebody!
Further update, after some phoning around, went back to Currys and their fixed price, no fee if no repair cost is £109! So have booked them.
Thanks for giving good info to all on the Consumer Rights act. I had a TV that was 5 years old, and I badgered Currys about the Sales of Good Act (as it was at the time) and it should last 6 years etc. They had it collected and repaired for free and it lasted me another 6 years until It finally gave out 2 months ago. Good stint for a plasma TV!

I would probably just get a new Tumble Dryer. The repair will only be covered by the same Consumer rights act for no more than a year (and something else could go wrong in that time too). So essentially you are paying £109 for possibly, 1 year use (you might get lucky and it lasts for a lot longer). If you got a new machine, you'd be paying ~£250? for 6 years minimum use = £41.66 per year.
Edited by: "jambone" 21st Nov
jambone21/11/2019 11:16

Thanks for giving good info to all on the Consumer Rights act. I had a TV …Thanks for giving good info to all on the Consumer Rights act. I had a TV that was 5 years old, and I badgered Currys about the Sales of Good Act (as it was at the time) and it should last 6 years etc. They had it collected and repaired for free and it lasted me another 6 years until It finally gave out 2 months ago. Good stint for a plasma TV! I would probably just get a new Tumble Dryer. The repair will only be covered by the same Consumer rights act for no more than a year (and something else could go wrong in that time too). So essentially you are paying £109 for possibly, 1 year use (you might get lucky and it lasts for a lot longer). If you got a new machine, you'd be paying ~£250? for 6 years minimum use = £41.66 per year.


Yeah, I know what you mean and I was in two minds. I'm trying not to spend more than is necessary, plus I'd have to pay for the old machine to be taken away and recycled or have the hassle of selling it on eBay.

The machine is a lot better than our previous one, and with the £107.97 refund and £109 repair cost, it's effectively costing me £1.03 to get my machine repaired even though it's outside it's 12 month warranty. So on balance that's the best option for me. If the machine had generally been poor I'd probably of replaced it. I'm also conscious of a throw away disposable culture, with cheap appliances which I'd prefer not to add to.
Edited by: "MikeCumbria" 21st Nov
Am I the only one that thinks that the retailer being obligated to foot the losses is a bit wrong?
Should be the manufactor as the retailer did not built the item.
Yeah I said that 5 comments up

I agree the manufacturer should be the entity responsible. Plus it would mean manufacturers had an interest in making products that would last and make it more easily enforceable to claim. Small retailers are less likely to make it easy for consumers.
gcmarcal21/11/2019 12:22

Am I the only one that thinks that the retailer being obligated to foot …Am I the only one that thinks that the retailer being obligated to foot the losses is a bit wrong?Should be the manufactor as the retailer did not built the item.


And how do you expect British law to be applied to the factory in turkey making your washing machine, the workshop in vietnam making your dining table or the factory in Brazil making your sofa?

You'd be forcing retailers to only stock products from manufacturers with a British branch. While that might work for industries populated by big companies due to a economies of scale or a big up front investment, any field with lots of small manufacturers would be decimated.

The way it is now allows retailers to source their products from where they wish, while manufacturers can tempt retailers to stock their product by offering to help with the support costs.
EndlessWaves21/11/2019 16:05

And how do you expect British law to be applied to the factory in turkey …And how do you expect British law to be applied to the factory in turkey making your washing machine, the workshop in vietnam making your dining table or the factory in Brazil making your sofa?You'd be forcing retailers to only stock products from manufacturers with a British branch. While that might work for industries populated by big companies due to a economies of scale or a big up front investment, any field with lots of small manufacturers would be decimated. The way it is now allows retailers to source their products from where they wish, while manufacturers can tempt retailers to stock their product by offering to help with the support costs.


Retailers AND manufacturers are based all over the world, but most large scale home appliance manufacturers have UK offices. I think the law is a great idea in principle, but seems a tad unfair to retailers, who are being held responsible for manufacturers product reliability.

You certainly have a point that it's not going to always be easy to enforce British law on overseas manufacturers, but that would be the same for overseas retailers. Making the law relate to manufacturers, would still be best and fairer in my opinion.
Edited by: "MikeCumbria" 22nd Nov
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