Paints For The Home - Which to choose and what are the differences?

2
Posted 31st Oct
When decorating we all end up with a huge amount of choice and it's never really that easy to make a decision on colours and finishes. Sometimes you end up having to dig around trying to find out what is best for certain jobs. It can be pretty frustrating if you just don't know what the differences are.

I've done some research coupled with my own knowledge, to hopefully provide you with something you'll find useful. For instance, you may know all about about emulsion, but what about Anti-Damp and Masonry? Which gloss do I buy and why?! Arrrgh! It's all time consuming looking through it all, especially for people that feel totally clueless over the whole thing.

I don't doubt that there are lots of members here that know some of this stuff inside out. Hopefully the comments will provide some constructive / helpful information that we can add to this thread.

If we have any professionals in, it would be fantastic to add your advice to the whole thing! Let me know if you feel I can add / change something . I've learned a whole lot just from researching to build this thread.

Anyway, I'll stop rambling... it's like watching paint dry



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Emulsion - Walls

Emulsion is a paint we're all probably familiar with. They are water based and come in various finishes, depending what you want the end result to look like. Vinyl or acrylic resins are added to make the overall result hardwearing. This addition of those will add some sheen to the finish

The main types you'll come across are:

Matt - As the name suggests, you won't get a shine to this. Typically they mark more easily than the Satin and Silk counterparts.

Satin - Tougher than a matt and you get a light sheen finish

Silk - You'll get a hardwearing result with this and a high sheen - The toughest of the bunch - Idea for places that see a lot of humidity - We use this in the Kitchen & Bathroom

Note - When you see "Kitchen & Bathroom Paint" on a tin, it usually it's just marketing talk for Silk. Make sure you're not paying too much for having that label on there! It's also good for high traffic areas.



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Gloss Paint
- woodwork / metals

Liquid Gloss - Requires an undercoat, leaves a higher gloss finish and is hardwaring.

Once Gloss - You'll not need and undercoat for this if you are going over an already painted area

Eggshell - As the name suggests, this will result in a flatter finishes than others.

Satinwood - Durable and doesn't give a high gloss finish. Provides more of a sheen.

If you go water based, you see that it doesn't give a high gloss finish as such, but more of a sheen. Oil-based will be more durable overall, although it does take longer to dry. Oil based will probably be something you'll want to use on things like door frames, as these see a lot of traffic / abuse and at a higher risk of getting bumped / damaged.

That's not to say that you shouldn't go for a water based product though. Just give it some thought before you get buying.

What about yellowing?
Yellowing is usually associated with oil based glosses and white gloss is the main culprit for this. It's due to them containing alkyd resin, which are known for discolouring over time, particularly in low natural light areas.

How about gloss for metals?
Solvent Based is designed for this, but it does tend to smell strongly and take a long time to dry (24h)



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Masonry Paints - Exterior
These are used for the outside of buildings, where the surfaces are usually uneven / bumpy. The paint will protect from the elements as well as moisture. If you are having moisture problems inside your home, get those checked out as soon as you can. Masonry paints will act as a preventative measure, not a fix.

There are lots of different colours out there. Take your time and choose wisely, as it's a big job.



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Anti-damp paint
Damp inside the home is a horrible site. I've lived in a few places that had issues over the years. If you've had it checked over and there are no issues to be rectified, then an anti-damp paint will be worth a go.

Wait? How can you paint on a damp surface?! It's NOT NATURAL!
Well, the simple answer is that a lot are designed to be painted on damp areas. They'll also contain fungicides to help keep that mould back. Once it's dry you can then go over it with emulsion.

Note: If you have mould behind furniture that just doesn't go away, and there is nothing that seems to cause it. Move your furniture away from the wall a little. Let some air get around there.

You may also wish to invest in a dehumidifier, to take some of the moisture out of the air and hopefully help limit / fix the problem.



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Primer - AKA Undercoat
Primers are used for preparing surfaces to take paint. Also known as an undercoat. They'll make for better paint adhesion, durability as well as the added benefit of covering up some of the underlying colour.

You don't always "Need" an undercoat, it will depend on the surface that you're painting. If you're painting over plasterboard / drywall as well as other bare areas, you should use a primer for sure. Flat walls that already have old paint on should be fine for the most part. If you have the time and budget to apply a primer coat, then you might want to think about it.

From what I have read it's a mixed bag on solid recommendations, apart from when painting totally bare surfaces.



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Painter and Dec.
Acrylic Eggshell can also be used on walls, currently have it on my own walls/ceilings in my kitchen and bathroom.

Wood - No matter what it says on the tin, you should always do two coats of a water based finish. Oil based only requires one coat.
Primer and Undercoat are two seperate things. Primer is normally for bare wood/surfaces/material and an undercoat is afterwards. You shouldn't put an undercoat straight onto bare surfaces.

NICOTINE STAINS - I'd like to also touch on the fact that an oil based undercoat can be used straight onto surfaces that are stained with nicotine and will block them out completely with no 'bleeding' through. You can use sugar soap etc and flood the place if you want but I prefer that ^
The same is also for 'water marks' which are not the same as dampness, water marks come through as a yellow stain and it's normally due to a leak somewhere. Only oil-based/spirit based paints will cover these after the leak has been fixed and dried out.

And under NO circumstances should you PVA a bare plaster wall before painting. I am sick to the back teeth of either 1) seeing this recommended or 2) having to deal with the consequences of people doing that.
You should always miscoat.

I will also add that this is fine for general consumers but I am a trade. There is a reason why we do not buy the stuff that you have quoted at the bottom like homebase, crown, etc.
Trade paint is more expensive however it has better opacity and has more pigments. Which means less coats = less tins bought.

You ever painted a wall a colour or even white and got two coats down the line and went 'ugh, it needs another coat but I don't have any paint left' so you go to the shop and buy another tin? So really you've spent £15-£20, having to do 3 coats or even 4 when you could have used that £15-£20 on trade paint and only done two? Yeah no, just pay the extra in the first place and get trade paint.
No lie, sometimes I have to do 3 coats like over a red or a black - high pigmented colours, but don't fall into the trap most people do.
Edited by: "Cloeeez" 31st Oct
2 Comments
Painter and Dec.
Acrylic Eggshell can also be used on walls, currently have it on my own walls/ceilings in my kitchen and bathroom.

Wood - No matter what it says on the tin, you should always do two coats of a water based finish. Oil based only requires one coat.
Primer and Undercoat are two seperate things. Primer is normally for bare wood/surfaces/material and an undercoat is afterwards. You shouldn't put an undercoat straight onto bare surfaces.

NICOTINE STAINS - I'd like to also touch on the fact that an oil based undercoat can be used straight onto surfaces that are stained with nicotine and will block them out completely with no 'bleeding' through. You can use sugar soap etc and flood the place if you want but I prefer that ^
The same is also for 'water marks' which are not the same as dampness, water marks come through as a yellow stain and it's normally due to a leak somewhere. Only oil-based/spirit based paints will cover these after the leak has been fixed and dried out.

And under NO circumstances should you PVA a bare plaster wall before painting. I am sick to the back teeth of either 1) seeing this recommended or 2) having to deal with the consequences of people doing that.
You should always miscoat.

I will also add that this is fine for general consumers but I am a trade. There is a reason why we do not buy the stuff that you have quoted at the bottom like homebase, crown, etc.
Trade paint is more expensive however it has better opacity and has more pigments. Which means less coats = less tins bought.

You ever painted a wall a colour or even white and got two coats down the line and went 'ugh, it needs another coat but I don't have any paint left' so you go to the shop and buy another tin? So really you've spent £15-£20, having to do 3 coats or even 4 when you could have used that £15-£20 on trade paint and only done two? Yeah no, just pay the extra in the first place and get trade paint.
No lie, sometimes I have to do 3 coats like over a red or a black - high pigmented colours, but don't fall into the trap most people do.
Edited by: "Cloeeez" 31st Oct
Cloeeez31/10/2019 17:02

Painter and Dec.Acrylic Eggshell can also be used on walls, currently have …Painter and Dec.Acrylic Eggshell can also be used on walls, currently have it on my own walls/ceilings in my kitchen and bathroom.Wood - No matter what it says on the tin, you should always do two coats of a water based finish. Oil based only requires one coat.Primer and Undercoat are two seperate things. Primer is normally for bare wood/surfaces/material and an undercoat is afterwards. You shouldn't put an undercoat straight onto bare surfaces.NICOTINE STAINS - I'd like to also touch on the fact that an oil based undercoat can be used straight onto surfaces that are stained with nicotine and will block them out completely with no 'bleeding' through. You can use sugar soap etc and flood the place if you want but I prefer that ^The same is also for 'water marks' which are not the same as dampness, water marks come through as a yellow stain and it's normally due to a leak somewhere. Only oil-based/spirit based paints will cover these after the leak has been fixed and dried out.And under NO circumstances should you PVA a bare plaster wall before painting. I am sick to the back teeth of either 1) seeing this recommended or 2) having to deal with the consequences of people doing that.You should always miscoat.I will also add that this is fine for general consumers but I am a trade. There is a reason why we do not buy the stuff that you have quoted at the bottom like homebase, crown, etc.Trade paint is more expensive however it has better opacity and has more pigments. Which means less coats = less tins bought.You ever painted a wall a colour or even white and got two coats down the line and went 'ugh, it needs another coat but I don't have any paint left' so you go to the shop and buy another tin? So really you've spent £15-£20, having to do 3 coats or even 4 when you could have used that £15-£20 on trade paint and only done two? Yeah no, just pay the extra in the first place and get trade paint.No lie, sometimes I have to do 3 coats like over a red or a black - high pigmented colours, but don't fall into the trap most people do.


Hey! That's some great information you've added there, so thank you for that.
I'm sure loads of people will appreciate advice from someone from the trade side, that really knows their stuff from experience.
Edited by: "NeoTrix" 1st Nov
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