PC SPECIALIST Vortex ST-S Intel® Core™ i7 RTX 2070 Gaming PC @ £1259. Worth it?

7
Posted 28th May
I think this has been marginally cheaper in the past and I know there's no 5% code currently active, but very tempted by this Gaming machine

ebay.co.uk/itm…317


I'm not interested in building as I've not done it in 15+ years and would prefer to rely on the warranty with one manufacturer.

Can you give me a second opinion? It's been as long since I was into PC Gaming in any way but I'm keen to use this as a VR setup.
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7 Comments
Building has never been easier if you want to re-consider!

Regarding warranty, Currys only give you 12 months? I think every retailer gives about that as standard for electronics, e.g amazon, johnlewis, tesco, etc? Not seeing much of a benefit there.

If any piece of hardware dies then you usually RMA it with the manufacturer once outside of the retailers 12 months. Power supplies often get 5-15 years warranty for example, that GPU I linked is 3 years. So unless it arrives dead, it's likely you won't need to use Currys and instead need to contact the manufacturers anyway, and who knows what random budget manufacturers or warranties they have supplied you with for this prebuilt PC!

Now as for the specs of this PC.. Personally I wouldn't touch an Intel CPU past or present. AMD are much much better value for money these days whether you want a super low budget PC for browsing or a high end gaming rig or something in between. They honestly have well priced and very capable CPUs for every user.

A quick mock up of the build you're looking at comes to about £1,100 including case (had to guess for most hardware as models not given) uk.pcpartpicker.com/lis…Z3t

So financially speaking not a bad price to pay for them to build it for you, however they are using typical poor hardware choices: Tiny SSD with an added slow mechanical hard drive, random motherboard / powersupply and whatever else you'll notice once it arrives as they don't tell you the hardware models used.

A build I made very recently is coincidentally priced similarly and i'd imagine, a whole lot better value for money:
uk.pcpartpicker.com/lis…Htp

Of course you can bring the price down by a couple hundred by changing a few things:

* Remove WiFi card. You can replace motherboard with a built in WiFi one if you need it - often cheaper

* A cheaper case

* A smaller NVMe

* A different GPU



So to sum up, if you really want a prebuilt i'd look for a different one: AMD 3600 or better CPU with a large NVMe drive (1TB is a good size) as they are only slightly more expensive than an SSD yet performance is drastically better so well worth the buy.

The days of buying a small SSD and 2TB mechanical drive are long since over. The better plan these days is to buy a 1-2TB NVMe drive and call it a day. Of course on the rare time you may need more storage, you can decide if you want another NVMe or a slow loud mechanical drive rattling away in your PC case!
PenguinsForAll28/05/2020 22:53

Building has never been easier if you want to re-consider!Regarding …Building has never been easier if you want to re-consider!Regarding warranty, Currys only give you 12 months? I think every retailer gives about that as standard for electronics, e.g amazon, johnlewis, tesco, etc? Not seeing much of a benefit there.If any piece of hardware dies then you usually RMA it with the manufacturer once outside of the retailers 12 months. Power supplies often get 5-15 years warranty for example, that GPU I linked is 3 years. So unless it arrives dead, it's likely you won't need to use Currys and instead need to contact the manufacturers anyway, and who knows what random budget manufacturers or warranties they have supplied you with for this prebuilt PC!Now as for the specs of this PC.. Personally I wouldn't touch an Intel CPU past or present. AMD are much much better value for money these days whether you want a super low budget PC for browsing or a high end gaming rig or something in between. They honestly have well priced and very capable CPUs for every user.A quick mock up of the build you're looking at comes to about £1,100 including case (had to guess for most hardware as models not given) https://uk.pcpartpicker.com/list/mnTZ3tSo financially speaking not a bad price to pay for them to build it for you, however they are using typical poor hardware choices: Tiny SSD with an added slow mechanical hard drive, random motherboard / powersupply and whatever else you'll notice once it arrives as they don't tell you the hardware models used.A build I made very recently is coincidentally priced similarly and i'd imagine, a whole lot better value for money: https://uk.pcpartpicker.com/list/NskHtpOf course you can bring the price down by a couple hundred by changing a few things:* Remove WiFi card. You can replace motherboard with a built in WiFi one if you need it - often cheaper* A cheaper case* A smaller NVMe* A different GPUSo to sum up, if you really want a prebuilt i'd look for a different one: AMD 3600 or better CPU with a large NVMe drive (1TB is a good size) as they are only slightly more expensive than an SSD yet performance is drastically better so well worth the buy. The days of buying a small SSD and 2TB mechanical drive are long since over. The better plan these days is to buy a 1-2TB NVMe drive and call it a day. Of course on the rare time you may need more storage, you can decide if you want another NVMe or a slow loud mechanical drive rattling away in your PC case!


Hi mate just noticed i have this up as deal, i did some digging and found the rough specs. (i put this machine up the other week and spent an hour or two digging around for ages)


Regarding pc specialist warranty.

Its from whenever the part entered their warehouse for part warranty if that makes sense?
Edited by: "Jordan_Taylor" 28th May
Jordan_Taylor28/05/2020 23:00

Hi mate just noticed i have this up as deal, i did some digging and found …Hi mate just noticed i have this up as deal, i did some digging and found the rough specs. (i put this machine up the other week and spent an hour or two digging around for ages) Regarding pc specialist warranty.Its from whenever the part entered their warehouse for part warranty if that makes sense?



You have to pay extra for the PC specialist warranty and it's direct with them from what I can see. So if you wanted 3 years you need to pay extra pcspecialist.co.uk/war…ty/

Seems like since they offer the warranty, you may not be able to go direct with manufacturers due to being a prebuilt PC? Not sure how that works, but either way you need to send the entire PC back if something breaks by the looks.

Never been a fan of prebuilt PCs as they are a lot of hassle and the costs keep adding up and up!
PenguinsForAll29/05/2020 00:12

You have to pay extra for the PC specialist warranty and it's direct with …You have to pay extra for the PC specialist warranty and it's direct with them from what I can see. So if you wanted 3 years you need to pay extra https://www.pcspecialist.co.uk/warranty/Seems like since they offer the warranty, you may not be able to go direct with manufacturers due to being a prebuilt PC? Not sure how that works, but either way you need to send the entire PC back if something breaks by the looks.Never been a fan of prebuilt PCs as they are a lot of hassle and the costs keep adding up and up!


You also have a part warranty with pc specialist still even if you don't pay for the extra warranty, that starts when they get the stock.

You have to go through them for that but they don't charge for the part warranty. Its under the free lifetime support thing

So if your cpu fails and your within part warranty it'll only cost you postage but oc specialist will have to claim for you, if you had the pc specialist warranty then they'd do a straight swap.

I think pre builts are fine, as long as the parts aren't bad and your getting value for money.

That build in the post works out basically cost price, maybe £30 cheaper than parts.

I think pre builts are lot easier for business use, if you need a video editing rig built and you don't want any liability yourself etc.
Edited by: "Jordan_Taylor" 29th May
Jordan_Taylor29/05/2020 00:14

You also have a part warranty with pc specialist still, that starts when …You also have a part warranty with pc specialist still, that starts when they get the stock.You have to go through them for that but they don't charge for the part warranty. Its under the free lifetime support thing I think pre builts are fine, as long as the parts aren't bad and your getting value for money.That build in the post works out basically cost price, maybe £30 cheaper than parts.I think pre builts are lot easier for business use, if you need a video editing rig built and you don't want any liability yourself etc.



Well, the cost of the hardware isn't the only thing - they chose a bad selection of hardware so that for me is a write off.

Prebuilds do have a place, but their offerings must line up quite well with your needs and of course the prices/warranties.
PenguinsForAll29/05/2020 00:18

Well, the cost of the hardware isn't the only thing - they chose a bad …Well, the cost of the hardware isn't the only thing - they chose a bad selection of hardware so that for me is a write off. Prebuilds do have a place, but their offerings must line up quite well with your needs and of course the prices/warranties.


The parts list for that machine that i added to my deal, don't take it as gospel but its not that bad.

They've taken some considerations to picking a mobo that can do the read / write speeds of the m.2 which some mobo's can't.

PC specialist aren't that bad when it comes to pre built systems, it's i buy power etc which use really bad parts like no name psu's etc.
No it’s not good, these companies use the cheapest parts in the machine obviously not the cpu but all the others.. if you can build you will get the same or better Machine but better quality.

plus the new gpu’s will hopefully be out in a few month and you will be better off waiting...
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