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    Photography lense question

    Have noticed there's quite a few people on here who are into photography and have been reading about lenses recently. In the article i was reading it was stated that lenses with a faster aperture are better as the wider hole will let in more light, which i understand, i have a 50mm f1.8 lenses. 1.8 is obviously very fast and will let in lots of light.

    All good in the hood so far, however my confusion is.... surely it doesn't matter, i read somewhere that to get a crisp portrait shot you should focus on the eyes and use about f5.6, so if i'm using my 50mm 'fast' lense at 5.6 it will be the same as using my carppy kit lense at 5.6???? if i use it at f1.8 it will let in loads of light, good for use in low light etc. however surely the dof will be ridiculously short??

    I'm confused?!?

    10 Comments

    Banned

    I'm confused?!?



    So am I and I know a bit about photography too.

    Here's a duck: http://www.dan-jackson.com/smilies/wtc.gif

    Original Poster

    Cool, thanks for the duck

    Original Poster

    Doesn't really answer the need for 1.8 though :-)

    Banned

    Are you taking photos that you intend to sell or taking up photography as a profession with which to earn a living?

    If the answer to either of these question is "yes" then your main concern should not be that you don't understand the f-stops but the fact you cannot spell "lens" or "aperture"

    en.wikipedia.org/wik…ber

    en.wikipedia.org/wik…ure

    From an amateur point of view IT DOESN'T MATTER!

    Original Poster

    DanJackson;4010331

    Are you taking photos that you intend to sell or taking up photography as … Are you taking photos that you intend to sell or taking up photography as a profession with which to earn a living?If the answer to either of these question is "yes" then your main concern should not be that you don't understand the f-stops but the fact you cannot spell "lens" or "aperture" http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/F-numberhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ApertureFrom an amateur point of view IT DOESN'T MATTER!



    Well the answer to both is no, but thanks for all of the useful help. Also the fact that you think being able to spell is vital to being a photographer is quite comical

    If you didn't want to offer any valid help then why bother posting in the thread in the first place.

    Banned

    sancho1983;4010432

    Well the answer to both is no, but thanks for all of the useful help. … Well the answer to both is no, but thanks for all of the useful help. Also the fact that you think being able to spell is vital to being a photographer is quite comicalIf you didn't want to offer any valid help then why bother posting in the thread in the first place.



    Because it angered me.

    http://www.dan-jackson.com/smilies/angry.gif

    Original Poster

    Well then i believe you need to take some pils or something, it's a very strange thing to be angered by; somebody who is interested in a subject and had a question about it. Perhaps if you know about it you could have been a bit more constructive than just resorting to 'nit picking' by pointing out spelling mistakes/typos.

    I understand being angered by people who post threads about what bed to buy etc. etc. but not something about an actual subject. But that's just me I suppose

    For a start your f/1.8 lens is likely to have better glass than your kit lens. It will also probably have less Chromatic Aberration and certainly out perform the kit lens at the same apertures.

    The classic portrait lens range covers around 85mm-135mm. This has to do with perspective. The easiest way to explain is think of what happens when you use a wide-angle lens up close; the lens will distort the appearance of the subject. For example, using a wide-angle lens on a child, shot on a downward angle, can magnify the apparent size of the child's head and minimize the body. Telephoto lenses, on the other hand, tend to "flatten" the subject's features. This is generally considered flattering, up to a point. Thus, short telephotos are the primary lenses of professional portrait photographers.

    The best thing you could do is take several of the same shots using different apertures and compare the results. I normally use a 135mm f/2 Telephoto.

    This may help you with understanding aperture and DOF: a300.org/tip…re/

    Original Poster

    softpurple;4010597

    For a start your f/1.8 lens is likely to have better glass than your kit … For a start your f/1.8 lens is likely to have better glass than your kit lens. It will also probably have less Chromatic Aberration and certainly out perform the kit lens at the same apertures.The classic portrait lens range covers around 85mm-135mm. This has to do with perspective. The easiest way to explain is think of what happens when you use a wide-angle lens up close; the lens will distort the appearance of the subject. For example, using a wide-angle lens on a child, shot on a downward angle, can magnify the apparent size of the child's head and minimize the body. Telephoto lenses, on the other hand, tend to "flatten" the subject's features. This is generally considered flattering, up to a point. Thus, short telephotos are the primary lenses of professional portrait photographers.The best thing you could do is take several of the same shots using different apertures and compare the results. I normally use a 135mm f/2 Telephoto.This may help you with understanding aperture and DOF: http://a300.org/tips/understanding-aperture/



    Thanks
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