Plastering a shop ceiling - cctv install?

6
Edited by:"hasnainthehotdeal"Found 4th Dec 2017
I am getting a shop ceiling plastered and am going to get CCTV installed inside the shop.

I was thinking of getting trunking put into the ceiling to feed the cables and then to get it plastered is this the best way to install dome celiing cameras or is there any better ways?

Am just thinking what will the easiest to change if a Ethernet cable goes faulty.

thanks.

  1. Ask
Groups
  1. Ask
6 Comments

Dunno if that's the best way, but replacing cables would be a simple matter of attaching the new cable to the old cable, then pull the old one through from the other end, which pulls the new one through.

Original Poster

bryanhaines39939 m ago

Dunno if that's the best way, but replacing cables would be a simple …Dunno if that's the best way, but replacing cables would be a simple matter of attaching the new cable to the old cable, then pull the old one through from the other end, which pulls the new one through.


thanks didn't actually think about that way to feeding a new cable.

I wonder how well it would work when around tight corners however as there are 90 degree angles at certain places.

Thinking about doing one piece of trunking per camera.

As someone who services the communal Internet/CCTV in several blocks of flats I can say that network cables don't usually break, it is the ends, where the Rj45 plug/wall socket is
attached to them, that do.

Be sure to hide a fair amount of spare cable inside the trunking/wall cavity (50cm or more if the position is awkward to get to) on the camera end, both so that a dodgy plug/socket can be re-done later and to provide enough cable length for someone to work comfortably on it while standing on a ladder/footstool.

If you have a cable route that you know will be a nightmare to service later there is nothing stopping you from running a spare cable for just that one route, just be sure to label them all properly on both ends.

Oh and just because you are concerned that a cable goes bad, make sure it is 'solid core' copper cable that is used, not stranded copper or even copper clad aluminium (CCA).
Stranded copper is used for patch leads only (e.g. wall socket to PC/camera) and copper clad aluminium is simply the devil.
Edited by: "SUMMONER" 7th Dec 2017

Original Poster

SUMMONER11 h, 47 m ago

As someone who services the communal Internet/CCTV in several blocks of …As someone who services the communal Internet/CCTV in several blocks of flats I can say that network cables don't usually break, it is the ends, where the Rj45 plug/wall socket is attached to them, that do.Be sure to hide a fair amount of spare cable inside the trunking (50cm or more if the position is awkward to get to) on the camera end, both so that a dodgy plug/socket can be re-done later and to provide enough cable length for someone to work comfortably on it while standing on a ladder/footstool.If you have a cable route that you know will be a nightmare to service later there is nothing stopping you from running a spare cable for just that one route, just be sure to label them all properly on both ends.Oh and just because you are concerned that a cable goes bad, make sure it is 'solid core' copper cable that is used, not stranded copper or even copper clad aluminium (CCA).Stranded copper is used for patch leads only (e.g. wall socket to PC/camera) and copper clad aluminium is simply the devil.


Thanks for all them tips - they are very helpful

having trunking in place cannot fail, even if you never use it better than having to redo ceiling after an install later.

I would use plastic tubing rather than trunking, you can also buy stuff on a roll screwfix.com/p/t…443
Post a comment
Avatar
@
    Text

    Top Discussions