Possible wasp nest and/or bird nest inside the outer wall

22
Found 24th May 2016
Yesterday afternoon, I noticed a strange noise coming from behind the outer wall (to the left-hand side of the window) in my daughter's bedroom - sounds like a lot of ducks! It is a constant noise even really late at night - I asked my daughter about the noise and she said that she thought it was the neighbour's ducks, however, my neighbour has not got ducks this year. This morning the noise is still going on and I went to look up at the roof area from outside. No sign of any birds flying in anywhere, but I did notice above the outside window - in the corner near the roof - a couple of wasps flying in and out of the same area. I'm now wondering if there is actually a wasp nest inside the wall area. Could the noises that I have been hearing, actually be the nest creaking with the wasps in it? I have read that they can chew through plasterboard walls, so am a bit worried that they are actually chewing at the back of the plasterboard. Any ideas on this, please? Thank you.

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22 Comments

Most probably, You're best getting pest control in.

I can't give any advice regarding the noise and/or help detecting if they are wasps, but perhaps you should contact your local pest control and explain this to them so that they can advise?

sounds like a wasps nest if you actually seeing them fly in and out,get wasps nest destroyer at diy store and spray as much as you can in ,do it at night when the wasps are less active.then if possible block up the hole they are going in

Definitely contact pest control. If there's wasps going in and out, they're most likely doing it for a reason. Make sure you turn all your lights off at night - we had a nest in our loft when I was a kid, my parents left the kitchen light on one night and that was it... house was swarming with them.

Get this chap in, Facebook video

sounds like a wasps nest if you actually seeing them fly in and out,get … sounds like a wasps nest if you actually seeing them fly in and out,get wasps nest destroyer at diy store and spray as much as you can in ,do it at night when the wasps are less active.then if possible block up the hole they are going in



I know this is a money saving site but even I'd pay someone to deal with wasps nests X)

Get this chap in, Facebook video


Might be too much of a drastic action to take in this situation. X)

I know this is a money saving site but even I'd pay someone to deal with … I know this is a money saving site but even I'd pay someone to deal with wasps nests X)



its really a simple job your all over reacting.

Very easy to say it's a simple job until you and your family get stung. Pay a few quid and get peace of mind

its really a simple job your all over reacting.



Not if a few wasps try to sting you and you fall off the ladder X)

Your local council will treat a wasp nest but at a price. Have you checked your home insurance as part of mine I have home emergency cover and that covers pest control. I used mine for a wasps nests in the past and they came out very quickly. It needs investigation soon that later. Good luck.
Edited by: "ashopaholic123" 24th May 2016

Not if a few wasps try to sting you and you fall off the ladder X)



lol cant do anything about falling offf the ladder but if you do it at night there will virtually be no wasps going in or out or do when its raining again there wont be much wasp movement.

Get this chap in, Facebook video


American? next they'll be trying 3lbs of tannerite together with 4000 rounds of 50mm and just to be sure it's safe 3000 police officers will attend and open fire if the see anything flying

Had to double check but it's legal to own a flamethrower in most US states, not too sure about the UK though

Is there a chance they could be masonry bees rather than wasps ? We have had these a couple of times and since they have fairly short life spans we've left them to their own devices. Last year we also had tree bees which took over our bird box.

However if it's definitely wasps then I sympathise, I murdered one this weekend after it came through the air vent in my daughters bedroom three times. First two times I caught it and released it, the third time it got gassed while it was buzzing in the vent, there were only so many chances I was prepared to give it. Raid do a spray specifically designed to kill wasps quickly, which I have now bought a tin of.

Hairspray kills wasps pretty quick.

Had to double check but it's legal to own a flamethrower in most US … Had to double check but it's legal to own a flamethrower in most US states, not too sure about the UK though



Can't see why they'd be illegal in UK, Blowtorches are legal and they're basically miniature flamethrowers :).

+1 for getting the council pest controllers in.
They charge about the same price as rentokill etc but I've always found them to be exceptionally knowledgable and lovely. The work will be guaranteed so if the nest livens up again they'll come back.

They will be dealing with wasps nests etc day in day out at this time of year!

Original Poster

Is there a chance they could be masonry bees rather than wasps ? We have … Is there a chance they could be masonry bees rather than wasps ? We have had these a couple of times and since they have fairly short life spans we've left them to their own devices. Last year we also had tree bees which took over our bird box. However if it's definitely wasps then I sympathise, I murdered one this weekend after it came through the air vent in my daughters bedroom three times. First two times I caught it and released it, the third time it got gassed while it was buzzing in the vent, there were only so many chances I was prepared to give it. Raid do a spray specifically designed to kill wasps quickly, which I have now bought a tin of.



I've spent a bit of time watching the roof today, and now I can see that it is definitely a few bees that are going in a hole around 2" wide (there seems to be a bit of a tile broken off in a corner just above the window and directly underneath the roof area. Just wondering, do you think that they are nesting under the tiles or are flying around in my loft? The noise in the wall in my daughter's room is still there and is constant - do you think that they have made the nest attached to the outer wall in the room? Now I'm thinking that there are not trapped birds in the walls but perhaps hundreds of bees. If bees, I don't think they are allowed to be moved are they? If they later swarm, if anybody is in the back garden at the time (daughter's bedroom overlooks our garden), will they attack them or fly over them?

I've spent a bit of time watching the roof today, and now I can see that … I've spent a bit of time watching the roof today, and now I can see that it is definitely a few bees that are going in a hole around 2" wide (there seems to be a bit of a tile broken off in a corner just above the window and directly underneath the roof area. Just wondering, do you think that they are nesting under the tiles or are flying around in my loft? The noise in the wall in my daughter's room is still there and is constant - do you think that they have made the nest attached to the outer wall in the room? Now I'm thinking that there are not trapped birds in the walls but perhaps hundreds of bees. If bees, I don't think they are allowed to be moved are they? If they later swarm, if anybody is in the back garden at the time (daughter's bedroom overlooks our garden), will they attack them or fly over them?



How to get rid of bees:

Contrary to popular belief bees aren't protected and can be treated, however they are endangered so we'd always recommend exploring all other avenues before considering eradication. Below is a step by step guide to assist you:



1. Leave them alone - Bees don't cause any problems to your property, and nor are you in danger of being stung if they are left alone and unprovoked. After the summer season the bees will go away and not return to the nesting site the following year. By the time a colony has become obvious its activity will be about to decline naturally. Generally, colonies formed in spring usually decline naturally by late July, if not sooner. Therefore If at all possible always bee nests alone to thrive as their presence is actually beneficial for gardeners and their crop.


2. Relocation - If a nest is outside or underground then there shouldn't be a reason to really move it. In more conventional and accessible places such as bushes, trees and sheds, then contacting a local beekeeper or pest controller to relocate the nest is an option. If you suspect you have honeybees and they are causing you problems then we would recommend you use a swarm collector from the British Bee Keepers Association (www.bbka.org.uk). In most cases they will come and collect the swarm free of charge. Only if the location of a nest is dangerous and removal not possible, should the next step be an option.


3. Eradication - The decision to treat will depend if it is possible to close the entrance(s) to the nest after treatment. In this circumstance make sure you use a trained professional. We strongly recommend you contact a professional pest control company, preferably a member of the BPCA. A trained professional will have the technical knowledge and access to a range of professional use insecticides which are not available to the public.

Post treatment requirements will vary depending on the species of bees you have. For bumblebees and tree bees, blocking up access points will prevent non-target bees from entering and getting contaminated, as well as shortening the likelihood of other bees accessing the same area in the future.

For solitary/masonry bees, in the long term, re-pointing with sound mortar is the only answer. However, this must be thorough as bees hunting for a nest site will soon locate areas that have been missed.

For honey bees, it is essential that entrance points or blocked off, and if possible remove all the honeycomb. Failure to do this will cause robber bees to find the infected honey and take it back to their hive, thus contaminating it.

PLEASE NOTE: Due to ethical reasons, not all pest control companies will treat for bees so you may have to contact multiple companies.


Source: - bpca.org.uk/pag…145

Needs looking at by a professional for your own peace of mind. Best be safe than sorry. Check your home insurance pest control covered under home emergency.
Edited by: "ashopaholic123" 24th May 2016

I've spent a bit of time watching the roof today, and now I can see that … I've spent a bit of time watching the roof today, and now I can see that it is definitely a few bees that are going in a hole around 2" wide (there seems to be a bit of a tile broken off in a corner just above the window and directly underneath the roof area. Just wondering, do you think that they are nesting under the tiles or are flying around in my loft? The noise in the wall in my daughter's room is still there and is constant - do you think that they have made the nest attached to the outer wall in the room? Now I'm thinking that there are not trapped birds in the walls but perhaps hundreds of bees. If bees, I don't think they are allowed to be moved are they? If they later swarm, if anybody is in the back garden at the time (daughter's bedroom overlooks our garden), will they attack them or fly over them?


I was just about to post when I saw the official advice from RossD89 so I'm not sure how much I can add to that. Our local bee keeper moved a ground bee nest for us a few years back. This is the only time we have moved a bees nest but it was next to our lawn and we were planning an outdoor party for our son. We were advised that the vibrations of lots of lads running around could aggravate the bees and cause them to swarm. Beekeeper didn't charge us to move it from memory but I think we gave him £20 for petrol etc. he found a safe place to relocate them to, took him all of 5 minutes once he had got all his protective gear on.
Masonry bees don't normally sting so personally I would have a look in the loft it it was me to see what is going on. It sounds like they may well have found a nice spot under your tile, do you have cavity wall space there that they could have got into?
They are noisy little things, our last lot of tree bees were a small colony but made a lot of noise.
Edited by: "tinkerbellian" 24th May 2016
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