Potential Data Protection Act Breach

22
Found 24th Mar
Hi guys,

So I've been visiting a car dealership to enquire about a new car and understandably, the dealership have my details stored on the system to contact me etc.

I got a call this morning from a mobile number that I missed. The person isn't answering nor replying to my text messages so I searched the number on WhatsApp and Facebook and it looks to be a guy that works there personal mobile number.

I suspect he may have phoned from that number as I've missed a few calls from their dealership landline number and maybe suspected I'm avoiding answering.

Would this be considered a breach of the Data Protection Act? Granted, it's not too damaging but it makes me question who's handling my personal info.
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22 Comments
Why not just call them back and say you’re not interested? Nothing wrong with him using his personal phone.
Perhaps the dealership landline is down & the sales staff are using their mobile lines instead today.

Perhaps if you answered your telephone when they called previously you would know what they wanted.

Perhaps he wants to ask you on a date.

...However, yes, if your contact details are retained in a personal mobile telephone contact database, & you have a problem with that, ask for them to be removed.
How do you know it's his personal number? Probably his work mobile that he also uses for personal use.
It's not like he is phoning you to find out if your wife is free tonight is it! He is in a sales job trying to sell you a car.
Thank whatever made up deity you worship he didn't use a public phone box!!!!!!!!
you gave them your data, its not being miss used and its just a phone number, so no.
Edited by: "catbeans" 24th Mar
Just speak to them. Could of solved this by now.
As long as the call is related to the business then no issue with what phone they use to call you on
Edited by: "mds1256" 24th Mar
As above. just call them and ask for your details to be removed from their system. Tell them if you need or want anything you will call them. You can also ask about the mobile number that called you.
was it Motorpoint or Arnold Clark
Edited by: "caverncity" 24th Mar
How do you know it wasn't a mobile phone supplied by the car dealership to their salesperson, nothing to worry about unless you want to.
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So you went to a car dealership and gave them your contact details and someone has attempted to contact you. And the problem is what exactly
artnada8 m ago

[Image] [Image] [Image]



Drinking Straws Four William Simmonite.

Nailed it.
fanpages7 m ago

Drinking Straws Four William Simmonite.Nailed it.


You got it lol
You supplied your data with the express intent of allowing them to contact you about a car/cars. By him ringing from a mobile is no different to calling from a landline, as long as it’s being used with the intention of trying to sell you a car they are compliant. If he was calling to try and get your daughters phone number that would be dodgy!!
cmdr_elito35 m ago

You supplied your data with the express intent of allowing them to contact …You supplied your data with the express intent of allowing them to contact you about a car/cars. By him ringing from a mobile is no different to calling from a landline, as long as it’s being used with the intention of trying to sell you a car they are compliant. If he was calling to try and get your daughters phone number that would be dodgy!!


You're missing the point.

The data is being used (presumably) as allowed, but isn't necessarily being stored in compliance with the DPA. The business has the right to use and store the data on its equipment under the terms specified, its employees do not have the right to transfer that data to their personal devices and take it home with them. That's a data leak.
dxx14 m ago

You're missing the point. The data is being used (presumably) as allowed, …You're missing the point. The data is being used (presumably) as allowed, but isn't necessarily being stored in compliance with the DPA. The business has the right to use and store the data on its equipment under the terms specified, its employees do not have the right to transfer that data to their personal devices and take it home with them. That's a data leak.


How do you know the phone is a "personal device" and he was calling from his home? He could have been calling from work using a company supplied mobile for his use.
Van197330 m ago

How do you know the phone is a "personal device" and he was calling from …How do you know the phone is a "personal device" and he was calling from his home? He could have been calling from work using a company supplied mobile for his use.


Indeed, he could have been. We don't know. My point was that it's the rules on storage rather than use which may have been breached here, not that they have.
Very petty
chocci3 h, 14 m ago

Very petty


Sort of but. This is the thin end of the wedge. Once you lose control of your data, its gone. If you think that's' OK then please never even consider getting upset if you get scammed. Aggregating data is a key part of fraud. The more they know about someone, the more likely it is they can dupe them for your own purposes.

I have used Motorpoint to buy 3 cars over several years and their staff using their mobiles has never happened to me. As someone said, perhaps all the lines were down but somehow that doesn't ring true.

With GDPR on the horizon, many of us have good cause to worry about being responsible for a Breach. If you hold data any data as a business, you need to be doing stuff now. If GDPR means noting to you and you are in business, get moving on it.

(GDPR = nilehq.com/jou…es/)
dxx11 h, 53 m ago

You're missing the point. The data is being used (presumably) as allowed, …You're missing the point. The data is being used (presumably) as allowed, but isn't necessarily being stored in compliance with the DPA. The business has the right to use and store the data on its equipment under the terms specified, its employees do not have the right to transfer that data to their personal devices and take it home with them. That's a data leak.


It is unlikely that it is a personal phone, it’s more likely that it’s a company mobile phone, the phone will be secured with a pass code and is owned/paid for by the company.

The tax implications of claiming personal phone bills are very unfavourable which is why companies provide mobile phones which are owned by the company and part of their core infrastructure.
is a phone number personal data?
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