Power point for separate electric hob and oven

16
Posted 16th JanEdited by:"mutley1"
I currently have a free standing electric cooker in the kitchen (9.9 Kw), which is hard wired. I am looking to replace this with a separate electric hob and under the counter electric oven.

Can someone advise me if the power point needs to be changed for the new appliances as there will be 2 instead of one? And if so, what exactly needs changing?

I won't be doing the work myself and will be employing an electrician, but before I get a quote, I would like to understand what needs to be done so I can speak to the electrician with some knowledge.
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The power point at a minimum needs changed to a dual appliance point, however without knowing the oven and hob you are installing it’s difficult to say if that would be sufficient. I’m not an electrician btw just offering a little advice.

Couple more things to consider - total load when oven and all rings are on, and the manual for both appliances some say to install them with their own supply so not doing so may invalidate any warranty etc.
Edited by: "AndrewRoss" 16th Jan
AndrewRoss16/01/2020 13:28

The power point at a minimum needs changed to a dual appliance point, …The power point at a minimum needs changed to a dual appliance point, however without knowing the oven and hob you are installing it’s difficult to say if that would be sufficient. I’m not an electrician btw just offering a little advice.Couple more things to consider - total load when oven and all rings are on, and the manual for both appliances some say to install them with their own supply so not doing so may invalidate any warranty etc.


i have added the existing cooker load information, 9.9 Kw, which is pretty high so the supply cable should be ok for the new cooker and hob. if i need a separate supply for each appliance that will be more work as i would need another cable to be run from the consumer unit rather than use the existing supply cable and split it into two connection points.
mutley116/01/2020 13:38

i have added the existing cooker load information, 9.9 Kw, which is pretty …i have added the existing cooker load information, 9.9 Kw, which is pretty high so the supply cable should be ok for the new cooker and hob. if i need a separate supply for each appliance that will be more work as i would need another cable to be run from the consumer unit rather than use the existing supply cable and split it into two connection points.


I’m pretty sure most of the time an electrician will just check everything and then install a dual appliance point and wire them both into that. It shouldn’t be that expensive imo
AndrewRoss16/01/2020 13:43

I’m pretty sure most of the time an electrician will just check everything …I’m pretty sure most of the time an electrician will just check everything and then install a dual appliance point and wire them both into that. It shouldn’t be that expensive imo


as the existing cooker is already high powered as it is a cooker and hob combined so the power use will be no different to two separate appliances. i think the cable supply won't need upgrading to cope with the new demand.

if the power point can be changed to a dual appliance power point then that would be a very simple job and wouldn't cost very much as you say. but if a new supply is needed then that will be more complicated.
I’ve just had my kitchen done and as I bought the house and it was a renovation job the spark removed the whole cabling and started Fresh, he hard wired the oven and all the appliances are on a gang switch and can all be isolated from one place by the flick of a switch
Edited by: "ashmac" 16th Jan
Regular separate Hobs and Ovens normally use a normal 13 amp supply . So your electrician will have to wire two new 13 amp sockets to the ring main. To use the current cooker supply the Circuit breaker would need changing on the distribution board. The Electrician will tell you the cheapest option.
Edited by: "yorkie12" 16th Jan
yorkie1216/01/2020 16:04

Regular separate Hobs and Ovens normally use a normal 13 amp supply . So …Regular separate Hobs and Ovens normally use a normal 13 amp supply . So your electrician will have to wire two new 13 amp sockets to the ring main. To use the current cooker supply the Circuit breaker would need changing on the distribution board. The Electrician will tell you the cheapest option.


as far as i understand the oven can be connected to a 13 amp supply but the hob would need a higher power supply, as that is high wattage. the existing cooker is already ran off its own 45A supply (with its own isolation switch) so this is more than enough for the two new appliances if it can be split into two power points.
i'm not an electrician, but in theory a spark could run 2 fused spurs off a junction box fed by the existing 45A circuit then wire the oven into one, hob into the other

i assume the fused spurs would then need to be fused at 13A
A lot of it depends on what the appliances you are installing require. Quick look at curry’s shows a number of ovens and hobs that run off a 13a connection and a similar number that both need 32a. Hard to say what the electrician will need to do without that or give approximate costs. Tracking the wall to fit new sockets etc will obviously add to it.
AndrewRoss16/01/2020 17:23

A lot of it depends on what the appliances you are installing require. …A lot of it depends on what the appliances you are installing require. Quick look at curry’s shows a number of ovens and hobs that run off a 13a connection and a similar number that both need 32a. Hard to say what the electrician will need to do without that or give approximate costs. Tracking the wall to fit new sockets etc will obviously add to it.


the new oven will need no more than 13 amp but the new hob will probably need more as it is going to be an induction hob but i haven't yet decided on the actual hob itself. i am planning to put in a new kitchen and that will be part of that work. however, before then i need to consider upgrading the electrics at the property and i want to take this into account when i get the electrics done so it is ready for the new kitchen.
10kw is a bit of a beast to be honest, that’s just under 44A load so the cable supplying your existing cooker is definitely man enough so I wouldn’t worry about that - you have a couple of options. What I would do if I was the spark would be to spur off the kitchen ring for the oven (different circuit) to a socket for the oven. And then use the existing cable supplying your current cooker to power the new hob directly, 99 percent of hobs will use less than 40a so you have your pick of the bunch really. Just so you know the standard way of connecting a large hob bigger than 3kw is to take the feed cable to a cooker control switch (the big red switch above the counter) and into a cooker connection unit (the equivalent of the socket) at low level
Edited by: "dealhunter1237" 16th Jan
dealhunter123716/01/2020 19:49

10kw is a bit of a beast to be honest, that’s just under 44A load so the c …10kw is a bit of a beast to be honest, that’s just under 44A load so the cable supplying your existing cooker is definitely man enough so I wouldn’t worry about that - you have a couple of options. What I would do if I was the spark would be to spur off the kitchen ring for the oven (different circuit) to a socket for the oven. And then use the existing cable supplying your current cooker to power the new hob directly, 99 percent of hobs will use less than 40a so you have your pick of the bunch really. Just so you know the standard way of connecting a large hob bigger than 3kw is to take the feed cable to a cooker control switch (the big red switch above the counter) and into a cooker connection unit (the equivalent of the socket) at low level


the current electric cooker is very powerful and is connected as you described that would connect a new hob bigger than 3kw. so it will be simple enough to connect the new hob to that power point at low level. so the electrician just need to spur off the kitchen ring to the oven.

technical speak, when you say spur off the kitchen ring, do you mean run a cable from an existing socket in the kitchen that other electric appliances use? that is on a separate circuit to that for the current cooker.
Exactly, in most houses there is a kitchen ring for sockets above the worktop and other items such as dishwashers, boiler etc. If you look at your consumer unit, there should be a 32a b type circuit breaker that’s says kitchen ring.

When I say spur of the ring, it means that a fused connection unit will be installed above the worktop (or wherevers easiest, but id imagine it would be here) which will then supply a socket for the oven at low level. Essentially breaking into the cable that’s already there hopefully

I hope this makes sense

The electrician may also suggest putting a socket at Low level tagged off the cooker connection unit, but it just depends if they can get the cable terminals in as you may have a 6mm (doable) or a 10 mm (origami fingers would be needed). But I prefer the first method
Edited by: "dealhunter1237" 16th Jan
dealhunter123716/01/2020 22:52

Exactly, in most houses there is a kitchen ring for sockets above the …Exactly, in most houses there is a kitchen ring for sockets above the worktop and other items such as dishwashers, boiler etc. If you look at your consumer unit, there should be a 32a b type circuit breaker that’s says kitchen ring. When I say spur of the ring, it means that a fused connection unit will be installed above the worktop (or wherevers easiest, but id imagine it would be here) which will then supply a socket for the oven at low level. Essentially breaking into the cable that’s already there hopefullyI hope this makes senseThe electrician may also suggest putting a socket at Low level tagged off the cooker connection unit, but it just depends if they can get the cable terminals in as you may have a 6mm (doable) or a 10 mm (origami fingers would be needed). But I prefer the first method


Thanks for the info. Very informative.
It's a bit difficult this one.
As the hob would be high rated. The oven maybe 13a or above.
The 10mm cable is more then enough to power the lot. A electrician should apply diversity to the circuit.
It would be to difficult to run 2 10mm cables from one switch to the other as the cable is to thick.
Best suggestion would be to install a junction box or a blank on what you already have and fit 50amp connector blocks and then a 10mm cable going to 2 connection points. It's tricky as the fuse at the Consumer unit is rated to the cable run. So down grading the cable to 2.5mm as example would not offer the correct protection. Maybe split the circuit from the 10mm to 2 6mm cables to the new connection plates. But something you would need to discuss with the electrician.
Fused spur would not be suitable for the hob as that is rated at 13a max. And hobs are 20amp typically.
kash201317/01/2020 01:34

It's a bit difficult this one. As the hob would be high rated. The oven …It's a bit difficult this one. As the hob would be high rated. The oven maybe 13a or above. The 10mm cable is more then enough to power the lot. A electrician should apply diversity to the circuit. It would be to difficult to run 2 10mm cables from one switch to the other as the cable is to thick. Best suggestion would be to install a junction box or a blank on what you already have and fit 50amp connector blocks and then a 10mm cable going to 2 connection points. It's tricky as the fuse at the Consumer unit is rated to the cable run. So down grading the cable to 2.5mm as example would not offer the correct protection. Maybe split the circuit from the 10mm to 2 6mm cables to the new connection plates. But something you would need to discuss with the electrician. Fused spur would not be suitable for the hob as that is rated at 13a max. And hobs are 20amp typically.


thanks. i am going to change the consumer unit so i will be able to ask the electrician about this.
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