Private Piano lessons for 7 Year Old

11
Found 12th Feb
Hi,

I am planning on putting my son for 30 minutes piano lessons. We found a lady who has her own key board and will do a 1 to 1 classes.

He has his 1st class soon so was wondering what I should look out for to assess the teacher.

Some people in here were great when they helped me chose the right place for him for his martial arts!
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I think as it’s a 1 to 1 lesson the best thing is to look at how the two of them interact. If your son doesn’t enjoy being in this lady’s company then he won’t want to go again or even bother practising.
Edited by: "Toptrumpet" 12th Feb
See if she talks and explains things simply in an age appropriate way, Does she give him simple tasks or sing along to the notes she plays to him. The first week she might explain just what the white keys do and what the black keys do or even just get him to understand what a scale is. Any ‘homework’ might be just learning where middle C is on the keyboard. I’d have thought that by now at school he would have a little understanding of howto read music and the difference between a crochet and a quaver etc.
Has he ever had the opportunity at school to learn a recorder?
Edited by: "Toptrumpet" 12th Feb
Toptrumpet many thanks for your response.

They dont teach musical instruments in his class currently. He was at a friends house with a piano and he picked up how to play marry had a little lamb in half hour after someone showed him.

She is young 30s and has a bubbly (but rushed) kind of character. We will see how both of them interact. Are you any good at assessing piano prices as I have been offered one but not sure if I should take it?
I would just like to add is that she is quite strict on class times which I can understand. I did request for a trial but she would like to charge for it. But all I am worried is, is she someone who is greedy and is looking out only for the cash.

My son used to go this martial arts class which was really fun but in reality each student did very less kung fu.
Before you pay out or invest in a piano I would see how he gets on for say 6 months or so, after all he may not enjoy it and quickly gravitate to another hobby or activity.
There are are lots of ways to learn the keyboard from making a pretend keyboard out of cardboard and painting the notes on it to using piano apps on a tablet.
If if he does progress and his teacher gives you the nod to buy a piano then I would look for any freebies on gumtree as they’re deemed as unwanted furniture nowadays.
The teacher suggested that I get a piano otherwise if the student doesnt start practising at home there is no point. She intends to give homework as well.
It wouldn’t be unreasonable for her to charge for any introductory lesson after all you are paying for her time, knowledge and apparatus, ( a bit like learning to drive). She is also perhaps testing your commitment as she’s probably given out free lessons in the past with little take up.
pay for the first lesson and go from there.
I think it’s a bit rough for the teacher to push you toward getting a piano at this early stage. Whilst I appreciate her reasoning you have to balance your son’s commitment and likely progress.
I’d suggest getting something like a Casio keyboard (from say Argos) whereby he can learn the notes, play simple tunes (like Nursery rhymes) and add different backing rhythms and sounds to engage his interest, and you can put it away in a cupboard afterwards.
I know it’s not the same as a real piano but even if he used it 15-20 mins a day it would better than nothing.
adamnsu3 h, 19 m ago

The teacher suggested that I get a piano otherwise if the student doesnt …The teacher suggested that I get a piano otherwise if the student doesnt start practising at home there is no point. She intends to give homework as well.


Totally agree with the teacher, there’s no point paying for 30 minute lessons if you then have no chance to practise what you’ve learnt. You’ll never progress. Forget about the suggestion of a cardboard piano or app, they won’t work.

You need a full sized key piano or keyboard, it doesn’t have to be an acoustic piano but it does need weighted full sized keys.
Just to add as a bit of experience from my son taking piano lessons.

You you don’t mention how old your son is but mine was 7 when he started lessons. I bought an electric 88 key full sized piano for home and he had the privalige to have his lessons on a really nice Yamaha baby grand piano in the teachers lounge. When I choose his electric piano I made sure it didn’t come with loads of sounds, rhythms etc as this would detract from practice and he would have ended up just messing about.

Someone mentioned waiting 6 months before buying a piano, I’d hope that the average child (who wants to lean and enjoys it) would be taking his grade 1 by then. It’s quite amazing how quick some kids can progress if they want
paulj481 h, 17 m ago

Just to add as a bit of experience from my son taking piano lessons. You …Just to add as a bit of experience from my son taking piano lessons. You you don’t mention how old your son is but mine was 7 when he started lessons. I bought an electric 88 key full sized piano for home and he had the privalige to have his lessons on a really nice Yamaha baby grand piano in the teachers lounge. When I choose his electric piano I made sure it didn’t come with loads of sounds, rhythms etc as this would detract from practice and he would have ended up just messing about. Someone mentioned waiting 6 months before buying a piano, I’d hope that the average child (who wants to lean and enjoys it) would be taking his grade 1 by then. It’s quite amazing how quick some kids can progress if they want


Hi,

Thanks for your input

I did put my sons age in the title He is 7. Progress IMO on artistic front mainly depends on the individual. I dont think we want to rush it but also dont want to move at a really slow pace either.
Edited by: "adamnsu" 12th Feb
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