Problem with new double glazed installation

10
Found 17th Aug 2017Edited by:"KB90"
There was a private builder came in on this Monday and found out the problem with the windows which was finished installation yesterday. I've raised the concern straight-away next day by sending an email but until now I am getting contacted mostly on phone and given different logic's.
In brief, they put the strips on external side of the windows. Are they trying to hide something (as seen in the picture's)?

Now the company is pushing me to sign the Finance documents to release the money. I spoke to my solicitor and advised not to do so.

Can someone explain me, why did they put this external beading (strip) which I've never seen before?


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The beading you refer to is fascia that covers any untidy edges that would have been left when your old window was removed. The new windows will not be the exact same size, so the edging fascias are used to make the install neat and tidy. It's a very common practice, and had it done recently on a full install on my current house back in January. Ideally all the windows will have the same 'finish'. Doesn't mean they have been installed incorrectly or badly though.
Edited by: "rich_1986" 17th Aug 2017
agree with the above.
Nothing wrong with that job IMO.
Adding the finishing beading is just for the look of the window - nothing wrong with this looking at the pics, as others have said.
Got to admit if I had paid for replacement windows I wouldn't be happy with that appearance. I understand when strips are used internally to tidy any areas where plaster has broken away etc. but normally the external appearance should be neat and "made to measure". Have never seen new windows with that finish.
The beading/edging is to hide unsightly edges as others have said.

BUT,

the first photo shows the vertical beading with a nice edge, but the top horizontal edge is terrible..

2nd photo is fine, the window is in a recess so easier to finish cleanly,

I'b be concerned about the 3rd photo, bottom of the window is flush with the wall, but the top is in a recess, have you applied a spirit level to both the building and the window, one of them is off plumb.....
Edited by: "andynicol" 17th Aug 2017
think its hard to remove the old windows without chipping a bit of render off, they look fine to me and with the white paint touched up they will look even better
2n
andynicol12 h, 44 m ago

The beading/edging is to hide unsightly edges as others have said.BUT, the …The beading/edging is to hide unsightly edges as others have said.BUT, the first photo shows the vertical beading with a nice edge, but the top horizontal edge is terrible..2nd photo is fine, the window is in a recess so easier to finish cleanly,I'b be concerned about the 3rd photo, bottom of the window is flush with the wall, but the top is in a recess, have you applied a spirit level to both the building and the window, one of them is off plumb.....


2nd photo - window doesn't look straight (see top edge)
Looks to me like they have used knock ons which means the windows are made smaller and they add pieces ranging from 1/2" upwards.
It all depends on what's on the internal wall ie tiles etc. If it was straight forward plasterboard I wouldn't be happy as it's a brick to brick measurement and should near enough be size.
If it was tiles etc on the other side then knock ons are used so not to damage the inside.
I've just had this problem with knock ons with a brick to brick measurement , got them to make new frames to the correct size.
The old frames where 2" out on both sides.
Yours look like bedroom windows , I could understand a knock on on the top of the frame but not the sides.
Nah, looks like shoddy 'workmanship'.. must try harder.
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