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    Program for ripping Dvd / Bluray disks and advice Needed?

    Hi unfortunately I will be moving shortly into a small flat and need to put into storage my massive movie collection so would like to back up some of my favourite films. As I'm not very computer literate I need some advice on an easy to use Dvd / Bluray back up software solution. If possible I would like something that is click and go and will create a file with all the info abit like when ripping a cd. Also how many films should I expect to fit onto a 5tb external drive. Thanks in advance.

    17 Comments

    It would be illegal to keep backups of movies unless you still own the original

    DVDFab

    by the way if you are ripping full dvds/blu ry then 5gb is just waaaaaay to low you need at least 2tb to 4tb

    handbrake

    5gb tiny..get about 3 or 4.

    bloooo

    It would be illegal to keep backups of movies unless you still own the … It would be illegal to keep backups of movies unless you still own the original


    Shame op said they were going in to storage huh?

    Westwoodo

    Shame op said they were going in to storage huh?


    I'm fairly certain it didn't say that at first.

    bloooo

    It would be illegal to keep backups of movies unless you still own the … It would be illegal to keep backups of movies unless you still own the original



    I thought the newest copyright law stated that it is now illegal to make a backup even if you DO own the original? You are supposed to purchase the digital copy as well. Or is that just music?

    Simple answer, if you moving shortly you'll probably find that the bottleneck is not the hard disk size, but the amount of time you have before moving. Video encoding and compression is one of the most time intensive things you'll throw at your pc, so if you have an old dual core processor or worse for example I wouldn't even bother trying.

    A full image of each disk is faster, but would be at least 50gb or so for blu ray, and upto 8gb for dvd, so a lot less can be stored.

    A high quality 'rip' you should expect 10gb for blu ray and 1.5gb for dvd.

    A low quality or high compression 'rip' (takes far longer), expect 500-700mb for dvd and 1.5gb for blu ray.

    Original Poster

    bloooo

    I'm fairly certain it didn't say that at first.



    ​yes I did not correctly describe what I am doing with my collection.

    bloooo

    I'm fairly certain it didn't say that at first.


    In which case I tip my hat to you sir, apologies.

    Original Poster

    AndyRoyd

    Legal considerations aside, to generalise: you have two options: direct … Legal considerations aside, to generalise: you have two options: direct image or compressed (re-encoded) copy. Imaging is relatively quick; whereas a compressed copy can be exceptionally time consuming and with associated energy costs.Direct copy can be accomplished by software such as DVDfab and is near one-click operation (the software title is confusing as it will also copy bluray). Re-encoding can compress the bluray to whatever size you wish, but the content will take a quality hit the more it is compressed. Software titles such as Handbrake will re-encode a bluray after it has been imaged, it has presets for size/quality options or can be configured manually, but then drifts away from an ideal of "one-click operation". If a typcial bluray averages say 35GB, you would be able to fit about 130 bluray images on a 5TB drive; worst case scenario of average 50GB per bluray image equates to 90 bluray copies on a 5TB drive.The re-encoding option can reduce the filesize to whatever you wish; you can probably shoehorn 1500 rubbish quality re-encodes on a 5TB drive; reduce that number as you increase quality.



    ​Thank you I would only want to back-up 50 - 100 films so that sounds the best option.

    Legal considerations aside, to generalise: you have two options: direct image or compressed (re-encoded) copy. Imaging is relatively quick; whereas a compressed copy can be exceptionally time consuming and with associated energy costs.
    Direct imaging can be accomplished by software such as DVDfab and is near one-click operation (the software title is confusing as it will also image bluray). Re-encoding can compress the bluray to whatever size you wish, but the content will take a quality hit the more it is compressed. Software titles such as Handbrake will re-encode a bluray after it has been imaged, it has presets for size/quality options or can be configured manually, but then drifts away from an ideal of "one-click operation". If a typcial bluray averages say 35GB, you would be able to fit about 130 bluray images on a 5TB drive; worst case scenario of average 50GB per bluray image equates to 90 bluray copies on a 5TB drive.
    The re-encoding option can reduce the filesize to whatever you wish; you can probably shoehorn 1500 rubbish quality re-encodes on a 5TB drive; reduce that number as you increase quality.
    Edited by: "AndyRoyd" 10th Feb

    keep the bluray out in a large cd folder. Rip DVDs as full isos and you can use them natively in Kodi.

    For 1:1 video rips makemkv is a quick option too.

    Easier to just download them via torrent surely?

    For original format then makemkv. It's a wrapper so takes everything from disc and creates 1 file although each movie will be 8+ gig. Many devices will play mkv files so that's good. I use handbrake and just select the presets as I can't get my head around the settings. I select android tablet from the preset settings and hit go as that plays nice on everything. Files are are smaller as compressed to mp4. Watch youtube for how tos.
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