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Protecting a outside gable wall

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Found 28th Nov 2014
hey everyone

just wanted some advice really.

whats the best way to protect a outside gable wall, which happens to face the direction where the wind blows in the rain on the wall.

not sure to paint it with masonry paint, apply linseed oil or any other options?

want to get it sorted before the real bad weather starts but just want to know the best option. the walls a standard accrington red bricks, its been pointed about a year/2 years ago but want to protect that side of the house before the harsh weather sets in.

any advice greatly appreciated.

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15 Comments

We had a similar issue with rain ingress - but the pointing was shot too.. so we had the pointing re-done, then the builders sprayed a silicone type coating over the walls.

Seems really good - not sure how long it lasts, but it makes the water bead off. Been a couple of years now and its still going strong.

Original Poster

patonar

We had a similar issue with rain ingress - but the pointing was shot … We had a similar issue with rain ingress - but the pointing was shot too.. so we had the pointing re-done, then the builders sprayed a silicone type coating over the walls.Seems really good - not sure how long it lasts, but it makes the water bead off. Been a couple of years now and its still going strong.



any chance you can get a name of the silicone coating your builders used. thats the thing im looking for, something that acts as a jacket to protect the wall.

EN1GMA

any chance you can get a name of the silicone coating your builders used. … any chance you can get a name of the silicone coating your builders used. thats the thing im looking for, something that acts as a jacket to protect the wall.



The stuff that Scuba posted looks similar... they stuck it into some spray bottles (the pump action ones you often use for weedkiller) and sprayed it on...

We have a similar issue with one of our buildings. The problem with applying any sort of waterproof treatment, including silicone, is that it not only stops the ingress of any water, but it stops any moisture in the bricks from escaping. This moisture has to go somewhere and will usually come through the opposite side in the form of damp.

An expert in this area advised that the best thing to do to protect masonry is to lime render it - it's the only covering that will protect the wall but is also naturally breathable so allows any moisture in the bricks to evaporate.

Original Poster

anewkillerstar

We have a similar issue with one of our buildings. The problem with … We have a similar issue with one of our buildings. The problem with applying any sort of waterproof treatment, including silicone, is that it not only stops the ingress of any water, but it stops any moisture in the bricks from escaping. This moisture has to go somewhere and will usually come through the opposite side in the form of damp. An expert in this area advised that the best thing to do to protect masonry is to lime render it - it's the only covering that will protect the wall but is also naturally breathable so allows any moisture in the bricks to evaporate.



does the lime render soak in any rain onto it? or does it protect the wall from the rain but also allows it to breath?

tile/clad it?.

Original Poster

patonar

We had a similar issue with rain ingress - but the pointing was shot … We had a similar issue with rain ingress - but the pointing was shot too.. so we had the pointing re-done, then the builders sprayed a silicone type coating over the walls.Seems really good - not sure how long it lasts, but it makes the water bead off. Been a couple of years now and its still going strong.



have you noticed any damp patches on the inside of your house due to the reasons mentioned by anewkillerstar?

EN1GMA

does the lime render soak in any rain onto it? or does it protect the … does the lime render soak in any rain onto it? or does it protect the wall from the rain but also allows it to breath?



Exactly, it stops the rain but allows the bricks to breath. Basically, we have a property that has a very exposed gable wall that at some point has had a cement render applied to it (cement render is not breathable). Over the years the moisture that has been locked into the brickwork underneath the render has caused significant damp issues inside the building. A waterproof paint was also applied, but this only made the situation worse. I have researched this issue no end and have had the silicone option discredited by pretty much every damp expert worth their salt (and their argument makes sense). I'll post a link to an article that outlines the benefits of lime render. It should be noted that this building is more than 100 years old so has solid walls which are more susceptible to these sort of issues.
Edited by: "anewkillerstar" 28th Nov 2014

Original Poster

Thanks for everyone for their advice. keep the advice coming as im trying to get as much info as possible before I decide.

thanks to everyone so far.

EN1GMA

have you noticed any damp patches on the inside of your house due to the … have you noticed any damp patches on the inside of your house due to the reasons mentioned by anewkillerstar?



Nope its been perfect since ;-)

Original Poster

patonar

Nope its been perfect since ;-)



if you are able to find out the exact thing the builders used then that would be handy. just a request mate

dont want to end up applying something which makes it worse.

EN1GMA

if you are able to find out the exact thing the builders used then that … if you are able to find out the exact thing the builders used then that would be handy. just a request mate :pdont want to end up applying something which makes it worse.



I will have a look in the shed in the morning - sure there is half a can left.

Original Poster

patonar

I will have a look in the shed in the morning - sure there is half a can … I will have a look in the shed in the morning - sure there is half a can left.



thanks
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