Remainers furious that UK grows faster than expected

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Hi Dave, I don't wish to unblock the ads on that site, so cannot read the article.
Can you please clarify who exactly is furious?
In my experience, the 'fury' is usually from the stubborn hardcore of right-wing xenophobes with their fingers in their ears, getting annoyed that we haven't exited from the EU painlessly yet and that immigrants are still here stealing all our jobs/benefits/virgins/etc

Thanks Dave.
We should be back to doom and gloom, scare stories and threats again tomorrow from the remoaners.
deleted91224525th Oct 2017

Are all the voters who voted hardcore right wing?


No, one guy voted Wenger Out:

32309815-fKXhw.jpg
hooray.henry18 m ago

We should be back to doom and gloom, scare stories and threats again …We should be back to doom and gloom, scare stories and threats again tomorrow from the remoaners.


They can't cope with democracy! This country has a brave and bright future ahead of us. Lucky we got out before the EU collapses and all the remaining countries start looking for trade deals.

The BBC wont report on this fully, the EU pulls their little Communist strings at all times. They like millions of remoaners want everything to fall to pieces which is staggering as if the boat sinks they drown too.

Would love to know what the impact of the 440,000+ children from the EU has on our economy.
124 Comments
We should be back to doom and gloom, scare stories and threats again tomorrow from the remoaners.
hooray.henry18 m ago

We should be back to doom and gloom, scare stories and threats again …We should be back to doom and gloom, scare stories and threats again tomorrow from the remoaners.


They can't cope with democracy! This country has a brave and bright future ahead of us. Lucky we got out before the EU collapses and all the remaining countries start looking for trade deals.

The BBC wont report on this fully, the EU pulls their little Communist strings at all times. They like millions of remoaners want everything to fall to pieces which is staggering as if the boat sinks they drown too.

Would love to know what the impact of the 440,000+ children from the EU has on our economy.
The problem is that Juncker will have to think up another skip load of more negative comments about Great Britain.
Edited by: "Predikuesi" 25th Oct 2017
Hi Dave, I don't wish to unblock the ads on that site, so cannot read the article.
Can you please clarify who exactly is furious?
In my experience, the 'fury' is usually from the stubborn hardcore of right-wing xenophobes with their fingers in their ears, getting annoyed that we haven't exited from the EU painlessly yet and that immigrants are still here stealing all our jobs/benefits/virgins/etc

Thanks Dave.
Not sure this is anything to celebrate. Even though 0.4% GDP growth is slightly stronger than the predicted 0.3% GDP growth, this would still put the UK at/around the lowest rate of growth in Europe.

In the last quarter, Q2, the EU's GDP grew up 0.7% on average when the UK's GDP grew at 0.3%.

However, the economy is still growing at a slower pace than it was last year. Year-on-year growth is at 1.5 per cent, the ONS said. If that trend continued to the end of the year it would be the slowest annual expansion of the economy since 2012.
Where's my post?

Is pointing out how abysmally we are doing since the global financial crisis compared to other countries against the rules now?
Edited by: "Segata-Sanshiro" 25th Oct 2017
We haven’t even left the EU yet, so not sure why there is some sense of victory or anger from either side to this news.
Edited by: "Biddy2" 25th Oct 2017
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deleted912245
Predikuesi54 m ago

The problem is that Juncker will have to think up another skip load of …The problem is that Juncker will have to think up another skip load of more negative comments about Great Britain.


Austria and Czech Republic next the collapse of the EU is inevitable However can only see Lefty countries staying in, France, Spain, Germany etc
I'm furious at the lack of fury in the link.
The important question to ask is, how does 0.4% relate to the EU and US? Because if their economies continue to grow at a rate which outstrips ours, this isn't good news.
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deleted912245
Destard1 h, 11 m ago

Hi Dave, I don't wish to unblock the ads on that site, so cannot read the …Hi Dave, I don't wish to unblock the ads on that site, so cannot read the article.Can you please clarify who exactly is furious?In my experience, the 'fury' is usually from the stubborn hardcore of right-wing xenophobes with their fingers in their ears, getting annoyed that we haven't exited from the EU painlessly yet and that immigrants are still here stealing all our jobs/benefits/virgins/etcThanks Dave.


Are all the voters who voted hardcore right wing?
deleted91224525th Oct 2017

Are all the voters who voted hardcore right wing?



I didn't know there was an option to vote hardcore or that's how I would have voted.
Avatar
deleted912245
CoeK1 m ago

I didn't know there was an option to vote hardcore or that's how I would …I didn't know there was an option to vote hardcore or that's how I would have voted.


Can’t answer a simple question, damn.
deleted91224525th Oct 2017

Can’t answer a simple question, damn.



Can't or won't... pick one.
Destard1 h, 20 m ago

Rant on / In my experience, the 'fury' is usually from the stubborn …Rant on / In my experience, the 'fury' is usually from the stubborn hardcore of right-wing xenophobes with their fingers in their ears, getting annoyed that we haven't exited from the EU painlessly yet and that immigrants are still here stealing all our jobs/benefits/virgins/etc /Rant off


Destard sounds a little bit furious to me.
deleted91224525th Oct 2017

Are all the voters who voted hardcore right wing?


No, one guy voted Wenger Out:

32309815-fKXhw.jpg
123thisisme3 m ago

Destard sounds a little bit furious to me.


Well, I heard someone trying to explain how foreigners are stealing our jobs AND our benefits at the same time.
I'll admit, it did make me raise an eyebrow.
Destard2 m ago

Well, I heard someone trying to explain how foreigners are stealing our …Well, I heard someone trying to explain how foreigners are stealing our jobs AND our benefits at the same time.I'll admit, it did make me raise an eyebrow.


There is more than one immigrant you know.
123thisisme3 m ago

There is more than one immigrant you know.


Woah woah, starting to head into "all foreigners look the same" territory, lol.
123thisisme8 m ago

There is more than one immigrant you know.



True but which is more, the benefits that some immigrants get or the tax that other immigrants pay?
Destard13 m ago

Woah woah, starting to head into "all foreigners look the same" territory, …Woah woah, starting to head into "all foreigners look the same" territory, lol.


Er no.
For the record immigration was not a huge factor in my voting leave.
CoeK7 m ago

True but which is more, the benefits that some immigrants get or the tax …True but which is more, the benefits that some immigrants get or the tax that other immigrants pay?

We should take in 60 million more immigrants because immigration must always be perceived as positive and if you speak to anyone who works for them, the EU is a very efficient organisation which is worth every penny!
CoeK8 m ago

True but which is more, the benefits that some immigrants get or the tax …True but which is more, the benefits that some immigrants get or the tax that other immigrants pay?


Not sure but would have thought the tax take was higher.
davewave1 m ago

We should take in 60 million more immigrants because immigration must …We should take in 60 million more immigrants because immigration must always be perceived as positive and if you speak to anyone who works for them, the EU is a very efficient organisation which is worth every penny!



I think you must have quoted the wrong person.
123thisisme1 m ago

Not sure but would have thought the tax take was higher.



Then generally speaking it is the jobs they are taking rather than the benefits. As a whole I mean not individually.
123thisisme2 m ago

Er no. For the record immigration was not a huge factor in my voting leave.

You must not disagree with the pigeon holes which remainers claim...they often state all Brexit voters are old, racist and have a poor education.
davewave2 m ago

You must not disagree with the pigeon holes which remainers claim...they …You must not disagree with the pigeon holes which remainers claim...they often state all Brexit voters are old, racist and have a poor education.


Well two out of three aint bad. lol
Destard26 m ago

Well, I heard someone trying to explain how foreigners are stealing our …Well, I heard someone trying to explain how foreigners are stealing our jobs AND our benefits at the same time.I'll admit, it did make me raise an eyebrow.


To be fair, some of your comments/accusations make me raise both.
CoeK5 m ago

Then generally speaking it is the jobs they are taking rather than the …Then generally speaking it is the jobs they are taking rather than the benefits. As a whole I mean not individually.


But individually they may be taking jobs and benefits, not sure about the virgins though.
123thisisme1 m ago

But individually they may be taking jobs and benefits, not sure about the …But individually they may be taking jobs and benefits, not sure about the virgins though.



I don't disagree, just highlighting where the confusion dastard describes comes from.
davewave6 m ago

You must not disagree with the pigeon holes which remainers claim...they …You must not disagree with the pigeon holes which remainers claim...they often state all Brexit voters are old, racist and have a poor education.


Sounds like pretty much all the Brexit voters I've had the displeasure of meeting.
You forgot to mention liking Trump; that's another trait that the most hardcore Brexit voters have in common.
Destard3 m ago

Sounds like pretty much all the Brexit voters I've had the displeasure of …Sounds like pretty much all the Brexit voters I've had the displeasure of meeting.You forgot to mention liking Trump; that's another trait that the most hardcore Brexit voters have in common.


So whats the difference between a brexit voter and a hardcore brexit voter?
Destard9 m ago

Sounds like pretty much all the Brexit voters I've had the displeasure of …Sounds like pretty much all the Brexit voters I've had the displeasure of meeting.You forgot to mention liking Trump; that's another trait that the most hardcore Brexit voters have in common.

Hilarious assumptions...and wrong again...just shows how some remainers are obsessed with weak arguments based on generalising those who dare to disagree with their vitriol for Brexit...

Its just a democratic choice about whether to remain in a wasteful and out of touch corrupt unnecessary secondary government.

Cameron tried to lobby for sensible change at EU but was met with FIFA like flexibility.
Destard36 m ago

Sounds like pretty much all the Brexit voters I've had the displeasure of …Sounds like pretty much all the Brexit voters I've had the displeasure of meeting.You forgot to mention liking Trump; that's another trait that the most hardcore Brexit voters have in common.


It must be awful to hate more than 17million people in the UK.
Well it does leave about 40m not to hate......
Destard1 h, 9 m ago

Well, I heard someone trying to explain how foreigners are stealing our …Well, I heard someone trying to explain how foreigners are stealing our jobs AND our benefits at the same time.I'll admit, it did make me raise an eyebrow.


Schrödinger's Immigrant.
davewave33 m ago

Hilarious assumptions...and wrong again...just shows how some remainers …Hilarious assumptions...and wrong again...just shows how some remainers are obsessed with weak arguments based on generalising those who dare to disagree with their vitriol for Brexit...Its just a democratic choice about whether to remain in a wasteful and out of touch corrupt unnecessary secondary government. Cameron tried to lobby for sensible change at EU but was met with FIFA like flexibility.


I've still yet to hear a solid argument for it though.

Buzzwords you learnt a year ago such as democracy, sovereignty etc don't count as a solid argument though, we need a collection of words that ideally make grammatical sense.
Towelie11 m ago

I've still yet to hear a solid argument for it though. Buzzwords you …I've still yet to hear a solid argument for it though. Buzzwords you learnt a year ago such as democracy, sovereignty etc don't count as a solid argument though, we need a collection of words that ideally make grammatical sense.


You haven't heard an argument you agree with.

That's probably why you voted remain.

However that's different to not hearing a 'solid argument', it was a choice you made when you voted and you were free to vote Remain or Leave.

Here's some of the arguments which are rational imo, even if you feel like the arguments for Remain are more attractive or make more sense to you.


LINK

marketwatch.com/sto…-29


‘Out’ argument No. 1: Control immigrationImmigration, a touchy subject in the U.S., is no less important to U.K. voters, especially given Europe’s migrant crisis.

The leave campaign’s “trump card” is “immigration and strong borders, the issue that has remained at or near the top of voters’ concerns for years,” said Clare Foges, a former speechwriter for U.K. Prime Minister David Cameron, in a column for The Times of London.

The EU has struggled to address the migrant crisis effectively, and Brexiteers argue the U.K. needs to avoid getting dragged down by the bloc’s actions or lack thereof. Migrants are taking jobs and places in schools from British citizens, “outers” argue.

“The EU response to the migration crisis is a Five Nations free-for-all with an invitation to Macedonia, Montenegro, Serbia, Albania and Turkey to join the Union,” said Michael Gove, a Brexit supporter and the U.K.’s justice secretary, in a column. “Because we cannot control our borders .... public services such as the NHS will face an unquantifiable strain as millions more become EU citizens and have the right to move to the U.K.”

‘Out’ argument No. 2: Make Britain great againBritain’s economy would be better off after an exit, according to London mayor Boris Johnson, arguably the most prominent politician in the leave camp. He has likened it to an escape from prison.

The U.K. would be more competitive because it could make its own trade deals with other nations and legislate in the interest of British manufacturing, Johnson argued in March.

The billionaire co-founder of broker Hargreaves Landsdowne has argued a Brexit “would be the biggest stimulus to get our butts in gear,” likening it to the Dunkirk retreat during World War II.

Such appeals to national pride and even nostalgia have big roles in the Brexit pitches.

“I yearn for the days when my (gorgeous navy blue) passport got stamped when I went anywhere in Europe,” said English actress and Brexit supporter Liz Hurley in a column for a magazine. U.K. passports are now burgundy and conform to an EU format.

‘Out’ argument No. 3: Reject the Brussels bureaucratsThe EU “has become centralizing, regulating and controlling, the opposite of what is needed for jobs and future success,” said Gerard Lyons, a leave supporter and Johnson’s chief economic adviser, in a column for The London Evening Standard.

Countries that succeed in the future global economy will “need to be flexible, adaptable and control their own destiny. Brexit allows us this,” he said.

Brexit backers complain about rules set in Brussels that stipulate such things as the curvature of cucumbers and bananas — and that even override Britain’s own laws.

‘Out’ argument No. 4: Reject what the establishment wantsIf incumbent politicians and big banks EUFN, +0.16% told you to do something, wouldn’t you kind of want to do the opposite?

That helps explain part of the appeal of Brexit. The in/out debate has helped reveal deep skepticism toward the establishment, just as this year’s unusual presidential race has done that in the U.S.

The Twitterverse, for example, teed off on how The Financial Times put a spotlight on bond guru Jeff Gundlach dismissing Brexit. It’s exactly the kind of thing that riles up backers of the leave campaign.

This is a nation, after all, that voted for “Boaty McBoatface,” showing its “healthy disregard for authority,” as one blogger put it.

‘Out’ argument No. 5: Lower pricesThe EU is a “customs area” that aims to protect the agricultural and manufacturing industries, said Lyons in his column. It does this by setting quotas, giving handouts to farmers and putting restrictions on just where fishing boats can trawl, the argument goes.

That “results in people across the EU paying more for the prices of these things compared with world markets. With Brexit, people would suddenly face cheaper prices for food, as we would be paying world prices,” Lyons argued.

The remain campaign predicts the exact opposite — namely, higher costs for families if the U.K. exits the EU. Read on now for that side’s arguments.



blogs.spectator.co.uk/201…st/

1. ‘We need to co-operate with our neighbours,’ say Remainers, as if someone somewhere were objecting to the idea. Were the EU simply a common market, a regional bloc like Nafta or Asean, no one would have a problem with it. What makes the EU different from every other international association is that it legislates for its members. In any conflict between a parliamentary statute and the ruling of a Brussels institution, the latter takes precedence. This legal supremacy, which was not challenged during the renegotiation, is the basis for the political merger of the member states. The EU has acquired, one by one, the attributes and trappings of nationhood: a president and a foreign minister, citizenship and a passport, treaty-making powers, a criminal justice system, a written constitution, a flag and a national anthem. It is these things that Leavers object to, not the commerce and co-operation that we would continue to enjoy, as every neighbouring country does.

2. The EU is not a free-trade area; it is a customs union. The difference may seem technical, but it goes to the heart of the decision we face. Free-trade areas remove barriers between members and, economists agree, tend to make participants wealthier. Customs unions, by contrast, erect a common tariff wall around their members, who surrender the right to strike individual trade deals. From the start, the EEC prioritised politics over economics and opted for a customs union as the means to a political union.

Britain is one of only two of 28 member states that sell more to the rest of the world than to the EU. We have always been especially badly penalised by the EU’s Common External Tariff. Unlike Switzerland, which enjoys free trade with the EU at the same time as striking agreements with China and other growing economies, we must contract out our trade policy to a European commissioner — at present, as it happens, a former sociology lecturer from Sweden.

We have (because the EU has) no trade agreements with China, India or most other Commonwealth countries. EU–Australia talks are being held up by a dispute over Italian tomatoes. Even the EU-Canada deal, which everyone thought was agreed, now risks being vetoed by Romania because of an unrelated row about visas for Romanians wishing to enter Canada. It’s a costly failure. In 2006, the EU was taking 55 per cent of our exports; last year, it was down to 45 per cent. What will it be in 2030 — or 2050?

3. We can hardly accuse Eurocrats of being shy about their plans. The Five Presidents’ Report sets out a plan for the amalgamation of fiscal and economic policies — a process that can only take place among the 28 states as a whole, since there is no legal mechanism for eurozone-only integration. The Belgian commissioner Marianne Thyssen has a plan for what she calls ‘social union’ — i.e. harmonisation of welfare systems. Jean-Claude Juncker wants a European army, which the Commission describes as ‘a strategic necessity’. These are not the musings of outlandish federalist think tanks: they are formal policy statements by the people who run Brussels.

The EU, in short, is responding to the euro and migration crises in the way it responds to everything: with deeper integration. Because Britain kept its currency and its passport checks, we have other options.

4. When Britain joined in 1973, the states that now make up the EU accounted for 36 per cent of the world economy. Last year, it was 17 per cent. Obviously, developing economies grow faster than advanced ones, but the EU has also been comprehensively outperformed by the United States, Canada, Australia and New Zealand. It’s not hard to see why: Brussels is more concerned with keeping the euro together as a means to political integration than in the welfare of the poor wretches who have to use it.

Back in the 1970s, western Europe seemed more modern and prosperous than Britain. Does it seem that way now? In an age of Skype and cheap flights, why should we allow accident of geography to trump ties of language and law, custom and kinship? Why tie ourselves to the world’s slowest-growing continent?

5. ‘Ooh, so you want us to be like Switzerland or Norway, do you?’ say Remainers. No: we can get a better deal than either. We are 65 million people to Switzerland’s eight million and Norway’s five million; on the day we left, we’d become the EU’s single biggest export market.

Still, it’s worth noting that Norway and Switzerland come first and second in the Legatum Prosperity Index and that their voters oppose EU membership by, respectively, 79 per cent and 82 per cent. They trade freely with the EU, while being exempt from (in Norway’s case) most or (in Switzerland’s) all its legal acts. They do pay Brussels, but less than we do per capita — far less, in Switzerland’s case. And, as well as the freedom to sign trade deals with overseas markets (they signed one with the Philippines last month, after just ten months of talks), they are self-governing democracies. The fact that they all have their own particular deals with Brussels shows how silly it is to expect us precisely to mimic someone else’s: we’d get our own deal, tailored to our own conditions. And thrive with a trade-based relationship with the EU.

6. A Remain vote will be seen in Brussels as a capitulation. Look at it from the point of view of a Euro-federalist. Britain would have demanded trivial reforms, failed to secure even those, and then voted to stay in on unchanged terms. After decades of growling and snarling, the bulldog would have rolled over and whimpered.

A number of plans have been postponed in Brussels pending our vote: the ban on powerful electrical appliances; licensing rules that will decimate London’s art market; the Ports Services Directive, which was opposed by every commercial port in Britain, every trade union and (for what it’s worth) every British MEP. But that secured a majority anyway, only to be deferred at the last moment until after our referendum.

But that’s just the start. With the possibility of Brexit off the table, there will be a renewed push to integration, on everything from migrant quotas to a higher EU budget.

There are some British voters who are happy with the idea of a federal Europe. Fair enough: if you’re in that category, vote Remain. But don’t imagine that you can cast a qualified Remain vote: your ballot will be taken in Brussels as a mandate for full-on integration. As I say, if you like that idea, fine. But, please, don’t be bullied out of following your conscience. We’re the fifth largest economy in the world, the second disseminator of soft power, one of five permanent seat-holders on the UN Security Council. We export tea to China, naan bread to India, kayaks to the Inuit. We have created more jobs in the past five years than the other 27 states put together. How much bigger do we have to be, for heaven’s sake, before we can prosper under our own laws?


Regardless of Brexit, with inflation climbing and wage rises below that many people are worse off year after year.
So overall I can't get excited by what the OP implied was a marginally higher GDP.

This post is seemingly just another case of someone who is desperate to push an agenda jumping on a marginal statistical change as if it was significant.
If people were truly secure in their beliefs they wouldn't need to act as fluffers for every bit of soft news trying to turn it into ammunition for hard Brexit or whatever their ideology is.
Don't let your preferences distort the truth or you'll end up like that fool on the hill; D Trump.
Ah classic Dave 'I can't form an opinion myself' Wave copy and paste!

Did you even read any of that first?

From what I skimmed over it was just endless waffle with no actual substance as usual.

Props for getting 'Make Britain Great again' in there though!
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