Removal of load bearing wall

12
Found 19th Apr
Hi All,
We’re buying a house and want to remove the wall between the kitchen and dining room to make a kitchen diner; the wall is brick and I’m assuming it’s going to need an RSJ. No radiators/electrics to move on it.
husband is quite handy, but not sure I trust him to do something which could be quite integral to the structure of the house! Is this something a relatively competent DIY-er can do or am I going to have to pay a builder?
Thanks in advance
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The formal route would require an architect to survey and specify the size of rsj and planning application for council so the work done is inspected and recorded matching building regs against your house.

When I had it done I employed a builder after I had the rsj specs and drawings - but have known others who have done the same themselves although some more successful than others with the worse having to undo work not inspected prior to covering and also redo work deemed not suitable.
Edited by: "Bertz99" 19th Apr
Get a builder in to advise. If its not load bearing and the house isn't listed then bash away. Otherwise do it legally and properly, if you try to skimp you may pay three times to have it done.... Once to build it, once to knock it down and once again to build it properly - plus the inevitable legal fees and possible fines.
Edited by: "mrty" 19th Apr
Get it checked professionally by a structural engineer. It also needs build control in my area.

We're in the process of dealing with the incorrect removal of a load bearing wall by previous owners, it was done dangerously and wrong. Do it wrong and you risk the roof collapsing or spreading.

We aren't having an RSJ to fix the removal and are instead having a bracing system in the loft. 5 large timbers crossing wall plates on padstones and then timber hangers to pull all the celling joist back up.

We've had to pull down the lounge celling to correct it and spend thousands making it safe as the previous owner thought he knew what he was doing.

We're in a bungelow by the way.

I've helped install RSJs for friends and they are a complete ballache, they are heavy as hell, awkward to move and quite frankly dangerous if you don't all lift in unison.
Edited by: "darlodge" 19th Apr
As said above. You need a Structural Engineer to survey and specify a beam and padstones. Also to confirm that the existing foundations of the wall can take the concentrated loads. You will also need a Building Regulations application.
Edited by: "Bobbajob" 19th Apr
If you have a mortgage you have to be very careful and if the house falls down or gets damage your insurance may not cover you under accidental damage as you are undertaking building work rather than for example repairing a radiator (normal diy). I would suggest getting a builder in and getting the appropriate permissions in place with both the council and your mortgage provider (which is likely required by terms of your mortgage).

If it’s a stud wall then knock through and do what you like.
Thank you all for the replies. We haven’t had our surveys done yet so I’ll get them to have a look at this also. Will also have a chat with our local authority.
Would definitely rather pay and have it done safely and properly even if this means waiting a while to ensure we can afford it.
The RSJ may need fire proofing/retarding also to comply with building regs. Ask your Council building control person..
fuiseog20th Apr

The RSJ may need fire proofing/retarding also to comply with building …The RSJ may need fire proofing/retarding also to comply with building regs. Ask your Council building control person..


surely if a rolled steel joist needs protection from fire you have bigger worries....
Brick doesn't necessarily mean support, all my walls are brick in my house but in the loft the beams are resting on plasterboard in between them and the wall, if it was supporting I believe they'd have direct contact.
Having just tried to buy a house with an internal wall removed and no building control you need to get this done properly. You need to get building control involved who will inspect the steel once it has gone in. They also need to see the calculations for the size of the steel used. Once all is good you will get a building control certificate which you will need if you sell the house later on.
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O'Reilly?
Money_Saving_Mum20th Apr

Thank you all for the replies. We haven’t had our surveys done yet so I’ll …Thank you all for the replies. We haven’t had our surveys done yet so I’ll get them to have a look at this also. Will also have a chat with our local authority.Would definitely rather pay and have it done safely and properly even if this means waiting a while to ensure we can afford it.


You must get this done properly. If you ever need to sell your house a good surveyor acting on behalf of the buyer will want to see it's been approved. It will have the potential to knock £1000's off the value of the property if the correct procedure was not followed
Edited by: "OllieSt" 22nd Apr
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