repair or refund on tablets from argos

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Found 19th Dec 2015
Hi, can anyone help me with a query. I recently bought a tablet on black Friday from Argos and it has only just been opened the other day and it has developed a battery fault and keeps freezing. I am only entitled to a repair from Argos or would I get a refund?

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11 Comments

if its faulty you are entitled to a refund I believe. you have 12 months warranty on it.

30 day returns period so should be able to return for refund best to ask Argos.

Original Poster

OK thanks. I wasn't sure with electrical items whether it is a repair only or if you can get refund. I'll check with Argos.

The Consumer Rights Act October 2015 is an interesting read where goods are concerned. The full version is available to view if you just google it but in your case here is what it says.

The Consumer Rights Act introduces:

30 days to get a refund For the first time a specific timeframe has been created in which you can reject a faulty item and get a full refund - now 30 days

which.co.uk/con…act

Just remember also that under EU law you are entitled to a 2 year warranty, not just the standard 1 year manufacturer warranty and you are also entitled compensation up to 6 years which may consist of repair, replacement or partial refund depending on the circumstances concerned.

yes

Smartguy1

The Consumer Rights Act October 2015 is an interesting read where goods … The Consumer Rights Act October 2015 is an interesting read where goods are concerned. The full version is available to view if you just google it but in your case here is what it says.The Consumer Rights Act introduces:30 days to get a refund For the first time a specific timeframe has been created in which you can reject a faulty item and get a full refund - now 30 dayshttp://www.which.co.uk/consumer-rights/regulation/consumer-rights-actJust remember also that under EU law you are entitled to a 2 year warranty, not just the standard 1 year manufacturer warranty and you are also entitled compensation up to 6 years which may consist of repair, replacement or partial refund depending on the circumstances concerned.


Interesting. Wish I'd pursued my claim with Samsung for a faulty motherboard on a Galaxy Note instead of being fobbed off.

Dogeared

Interesting. Wish I'd pursued my claim with Samsung for a faulty … Interesting. Wish I'd pursued my claim with Samsung for a faulty motherboard on a Galaxy Note instead of being fobbed off.



They will try and fob you off but as soon as you try and use our laws against them they must back down. At first they will hope you don't know our Consumer laws and will just go away. I did this some years ago after an unbranded tv failed after about 20 months. I vowed never to buy any tv that wasn't LG, Samsung, Sony etc and never did.

My son has a masters degree in law so it comes in quite handy having someone close who can explain things in plain speak. Basically everyone knows about the one years warranty. If you live in the EU you get 2 years manufacturers warranty. You probably see this in the small print in various things you may buy. Last thing I bought was a Whirlpool washing machine which states 1 years manufacturers warranty in the UK which includes Northern Ireleand but for Southern Ireland (Eire) it states 2 years. This is obviously because of EU law. However, last time I checked we are still in the EU so it can be applied here. Companies such as John Lewis are actually quite good as they offer a 2 years warranty as standard. I assume this is to abide by EU law. Our government could have made things easier where the EU law is concerned however you probably have greater cover under our own laws.

It gets quite complicated but bear in mind that your contract is with the retailer that sells the goods and not the manufacturer. The retailer cannot fob you off and ask you to contact the manufacturer direct or try and wash their hands of it.

In October 2015 our consumer laws changed. Any goods purchased from October 1st 2015 will be in accordance to that act. Any items purchased before then will come under our previous consumer goods act and also the limitations act. The limitations act refers to goods having some warranty up to 6 years. It can still be complicated. If you buy an expensive laptop, say a mac, it commands a high price in comparison to a windows equivalent. Mac don't make budget laptops so one would expect that a mac will out-perform say a £400 windows laptop. If your mac fails after two and a bit years it would be deemed as not being up to a reasonable standard as the price would dictate it should be reliable for a decent length of time. On the other hand don't expect to get much compensation for your Acer £400 laptop when it won't boot up after five and a bit years.

Its all still quite complicated but the main thing is to know the law. You don't need to know it all, just the but that are relevant. The best course of action is by email. Explain the fault. Research the fault on the internet to see if others have had the same or similar issues. Quote this i the email. Quote the consumer law which is relative to the retailer doing something about it. I have a copy of the wording that my son used recently in a claim to Currys. he had a Samsung tv which failed after 2 years, 9 months. The panel had a fault and was replaced under our consumer laws and not by any extended warranty. He could prove it had little use and that others had same issues on the internet. Under normal use for me this tv would have failed in its first year.

There are some exceptions. Speak to the retailer first via email. My son had to pay £95.00 for Currys to collect the tv on the understanding that if it was a manufacturers fault they would refund the £95.00. They did.

It is a big shame the companies such as Currys, who must be one of the last larger electrical retailers still standing, don't want to appear to adhere to UK and EU law and surely must be losing business on televisions to companies such as JL and Richer Sounds who at least have some sort of decency to advertise their televisions with their own extended guarantee. I know where I will be shopping next for my tv as it just makes it so much easier should something go wrong.



Argos are normally Ok, they will try swap first, but you can get a full refund.

I not read all comments here but onething which has changed is Usage, so you can only get a proportion of Orig cost back, if the Retailer becomes awkward, like Ebuyer tried after a certain time.
Edited by: "Mole007" 20th Dec 2015

Within 30 days full refund, anything after that they can offer refund, repair or replacement. It's upto them tho what they choose. (Normally cheapest option)

Original Poster

Thanks for the help everyone. What happens if things you have bought over 30 days ago, i.e. presents for Xmas and upon opening become faulty, are these not eligible for refund because its past the 30 days.?

Refund, replacement or repair. Upto retailer what they to chose.
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