Replace HD with SSD, so 2 x SSD?

5
Posted 8th Apr
Is there any pros or cons to replacing a hard drive with a second SSD?
Use an older 250GB SSD as my Windows drive, and have a 7200rpm 500GB hard drive for music, video etc.

Tempted to pick a 1TB Crucial or Samsung SSD and replace the HD with one, but is it going to make any difference at the end of the day?
It's for a laptop on mains power at present but might be put in a desktop I'm looking at building.
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There are no cons except that SSDs cost a little more per GB than HDDs. There's no real reason not to do it especially as you'll be increasing your available storage.
Edited by: "Haircut_100" 8th Apr
If you do that, I'd suggest fitting the old drive in an external USB case and use it to keep backups of important files.

I had a SSD fail on me after three years, there was already a high degree of file corruption from well before I discovered it was failing, so I lost a lot of data.
Music and video only need data at a fixed rate, it doesn't make any sense to play them faster. The only performance advantage they'll see from being able to move data faster is how fast they open and start playing.

You might drop power consumption slightly compared to a 7200rpm drive, but if you're going mains powered it's not going to make any difference and unlikely to make up for the extra cost and resource use of manufacturing a new drive.

SSDs are silent unlike hard drives, so reducing background noise is probably the most compelling reason to swap for AV use.
Got an external HD that I store backups on.
Luckily, never had any issues with drives.

Would possibly be using it as a games drive as well.
xenole08/04/2020 12:11

Got an external HD that I store backups on. Luckily, never had any issues …Got an external HD that I store backups on. Luckily, never had any issues with drives.Would possibly be using it as a games drive as well.


SSD will offer significant benefit over HDD in bootdrive applications and portable drive applications; not so much for simple storage applications. You mention external HD; if that is a regularly moved device then an SSD will be signficiantly more resilient to kinetic damage then a HDD equivalent.
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