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    Replacing a TV aerial plug.. ?

    SO.. my parents stupid freeview reception, seems to be partially down to their aged and slightly broken aerial connection.

    The cable seems ok, but where the silver plug meets the cable - its coming away slightly. I was wondering if i could maybe replace the plug on the end (the bit that goes into the TV)
    Not sure if i can do that though - its really old, the central point is a wire, not a metal stub like the one in the picture below.. so im concerned i'll pull the plug off, and it'll just be bare wires.
    has anyone ever done the above?

    27 Comments

    That'll do the job... the bare wire you speak of fits into the little hole on the adaptor. Just trim the wires back a bit...

    Wilkos sell them, infact most supermarkets I think sell them near the light bulbs and plugs and such.

    Very easy to do.

    http://i374.photobucket.com/albums/oo187/aerialshack/coaxplugfittingpic.jpg

    Original Poster

    wow! a diagram and everything.
    ok, great. thanks for the help.

    Celticsun;6503980

    Very easy to do.



    Very easy to do badly, much harder than most people think to do well! Its also quite probable that the cable from the aerial is old and not really suited to digital signals. Its worth getting a new plug and trying it as it will cost less than a quid - but you might find the whole cable from the aerial should be replaced, or possibly even the aerial itself....

    (Its a bit of a catch-22, but for now the digital signal is much weaker than the analog one, which is partly why people need to improve their aerials/cables/connections. Ironically when the analog-switch-off occurs the digital signal will suddenly get much stronger!)

    Wooot!?

    Do you work for Currys? Coax cable hasn't changed in decades. My grandads has been up for 30 years and works fine with digital.

    As long as you follow the digram above make sure the core wire and the outer shielding are not shorting out and you should have no problems.

    jah128;6504366

    (Its a bit of a catch-22, but for now the digital signal is much weaker … (Its a bit of a catch-22, but for now the digital signal is much weaker than the analog one, which is partly why people need to improve their aerials/cables/connections. Ironically when the analog-switch-off occurs the digital signal will suddenly get much stronger!)



    I hate you scaremongers. 99% of people don't need to do anything except change the connection from their freewiew/sky/virgin box to their tv from co-axial to scart (if they haven't already). I'm so sick of hearing people say you need to upgrade this and that for digital.

    Celticsun;6504505

    Wooot!?Do you work for Currys? Coax cable hasn't changed in decades. My … Wooot!?Do you work for Currys? Coax cable hasn't changed in decades. My grandads has been up for 30 years and works fine with digital.As long as you follow the digram above make sure the core wire and the outer shielding are not shorting out and you should have no problems.



    Coax has changed. Modern coax has a foil screen between the braiding and the dielectric, which helps reduce noise on the signal. This is important for digital transmission as, unlike the analog signal, excessive noise and interference will render the television unwatchable. Older coax will work with digital, but in a weak-signal area the modern screened coax is vastly preferable.

    deek72;6504567

    I hate you scaremongers. 99% of people don't need to do anything except … I hate you scaremongers. 99% of people don't need to do anything except change the connection from their freewiew/sky/virgin box to their tv from co-axial to scart (if they haven't already). I'm so sick of hearing people say you need to upgrade this and that for digital.



    What the hell are you talking about? How does 'changing the connection from their freeview box from co-axial to scart' affect the aerial signal at all? The problem is the cable from the aerial and its connectors. As I said above, changing the plugs is easy to do badly and quite a skill to do well, but often replacing the whole coax can be vastly benefitial. It isn't scaremongering at all, its practical, real-world advice from someone who knows what they are talking about...

    See ]this site for more information (particularly ]this page on cables, and ]this page on how to properly fit a Belling-Lee connector...)

    jah128;6504782

    Coax has changed. Modern coax has a foil screen between the braiding and … Coax has changed. Modern coax has a foil screen between the braiding and the dielectric, which helps reduce noise on the signal. This is important for digital transmission as, unlike the analog signal, excessive noise and interference will render the television unwatchable. Older coax will work with digital, but in a weak-signal area the modern screened coax is vastly preferable.See ]this site for more information (particularly ]this page on cables, and ]this page on how to properly fit a Belling-Lee connector...)



    ROFLMAO If you put tin foil on your head the aliens can't read your thoughts you know.

    You are the type of person who pays £40+ for HDMI cables aren't you :thumbsup: its ok don't be shy shomeone has to

    Celticsun;6505004

    ROFLMAO If you put tin foil on your head the aliens can't read your … ROFLMAO If you put tin foil on your head the aliens can't read your thoughts you know.You are the type of person who pays £40+ for HDMI cables aren't you :thumbsup: its ok don't be shy shomeone has to



    No. There is very little reason to, generally with such a short length TMDS digital cable its a case of it either works or it doesn't. But then a digital signal cable is vastly difference to a RF-cable.

    You can choose to believe that all coax is exactly the same if you wish, but if you do so you are being very naive. Before digital television, the clicks and pops caused by switching devices, EM radiation from consumer electronics, atmospheric noises etc picked up along the length of the cable resulted in at worst an instantanious bit of noise in the picture - which was normally not noticable and at worst a minor hindrance to the viewer.

    Digital transmission is highly compressed digital data - and similar noise on the digital aerial signal result in dropped blocks and frames, which results in a best solid blocks of colour in the image and at worst total loss of signal for a fraction of a second. To reduce the impact of the noise improved screening on the cable is used.

    I don't believe for one second that 99% of the population are in an area with such a strong signal of their pre-digital setup that they have never experienced this. If you have direct line of site to the transmitter you can probably get away with a cheap set-top aerial for digital, but very few people have this priviledge, particularly in dense urban areas.

    We always use that new stuff Jah is talking about, don't think I have seen that old stuff in a long time.

    It is just shielding foil, nothing tin hat about it, many cables now use it that didn't in the past.

    PhearFactor;6505191

    We always use that new stuff Jah is talking about, don't think I have … We always use that new stuff Jah is talking about, don't think I have seen that old stuff in a long time.It is just shielding foil, nothing tin hat about it, many cables now use it that didn't in the past.



    Any aerial fitted by a professional in the last few years would (hopefully) use the screened cables, but on the same hand any house with an aerial/wiring over about 10 years old will likely be using older unscreened coax. As you correctly point out its simply a bit of foil, but thats something that is necessary these days - we're not living in the 1980's anymore and technology has moved on, whilst they have tried to make digital TV as compatible as possible the reality is some installations will need at least partially upgrading (at least until the analogue switch-off anyway when the digital signal will get a lot stronger). :thumbsup:

    When replacing the plug it's best to solder the central wire. But if you don't have a soldering iron, you can buy plugs with a screw connection. eg.
    ]http//ww…606

    jah128;6505356

    Any aerial fitted by a professional in the last few years would … Any aerial fitted by a professional in the last few years would (hopefully) use the screened cables



    I am not a professional, but it seems to be the only cable I can get a hold of through contacts now haha. When they bring me a spindle, as of late it has always been the shielded stuff which I use for everything around the house lol.


    doberman

    When replacing the plug it's best to solder the central wire



    Oh I never do that. I tend to put a little kink in the central wire and when you push the pin moulding on it sort of makes a nice tight grip on the wire. Although, I am not a professional, just a handyman lol

    PhearFactor;6505446

    I am not a professional, but it seems to be the only cable I can get a … I am not a professional, but it seems to be the only cable I can get a hold of through contacts now haha. When they bring me a spindle, as of late it has always been the shielded stuff which I use for everything around the house lol.



    Presumable thats because there is not really much demand for traditional coax anymore! Screened cable was never much more expensive anyway...

    PhearFactor;6505446

    Oh I never do that. I tend to put a little kink in the central wire and … Oh I never do that. I tend to put a little kink in the central wire and when you push the pin moulding on it sort of makes a nice tight grip on the wire. Although, I am not a professional, just a handyman lol



    The kink method will work, problem is if its a cable that is connected/disconnected at all often the kinked-connection will probably not last that long; soldering is definately preferable but obviously a lot more effort; the screw-type plugs are okay but still not as good as a properly soldered plug...

    I always leave the cable with a good excess and hardly ever disconnect/reconnect. The ones I disconnect/reconnect use electrical tape and ]quick plugs (if that is what they are even called) - mostly that is for satellite though and not aerial related.

    PhearFactor;6505554

    I always leave the cable with a good excess and hardly ever … I always leave the cable with a good excess and hardly ever disconnect/reconnect. The ones I disconnect/reconnect use electrical tape and ]quick plugs (if that is what they are even called) - mostly that is for satellite though and not aerial related.



    Get yourself a cheap gas or electric soldering iron if its something you do quite often and stick it in your toolbox - if you have an iron handy its only a few extra seconds work and makes a much more reliable connector. And you can use it to make Crème brûlées.

    jah128;6505595

    Get yourself a cheap gas or electric soldering iron



    lol, I don't trust myself with anything that plugs into the mains or uses flammable substances to work. If something falls off, I just replace it :thumbsup:

    PhearFactor;6505630

    lol, I don't trust myself with anything that plugs into the mains or uses … lol, I don't trust myself with anything that plugs into the mains or uses flammable substances to work. If something falls off, I just replace it :thumbsup:



    :giggle: Its only a souped-up cigarette lighter!

    jah128;6504782

    What the hell are you talking about? How does 'changing the connection … What the hell are you talking about? How does 'changing the connection from their freeview box from co-axial to scart' affect the aerial signal at all? The problem is the cable from the aerial and its connectors.



    Go away, idiot. Changing from co-ax to scart doesn't affect the aerial signal. I was saying that the existing aerial signal is more than adequate for most, meaning the only thing they have to change when analogue goes is the connection from FV/Sky/Cable from co-ax to scart. No need to upgrade or change anything else.

    deek72;6507329

    Go away, idiot.



    Careful, that's not called for. Where have I made an idiotic statement? If you disagree with something why not explain why rather than resorting to name calling?

    deek72;6507329

    I was saying that the existing aerial signal is more than adequate for … I was saying that the existing aerial signal is more than adequate for most, meaning the only thing they have to change when analogue goes is the connection from FV/Sky/Cable from co-ax to scart. No need to upgrade or change anything else.



    Freeview boxes/sky boxes/cable boxes don't output on coax anyway. Coax is used for the RF signal from the aerial - things such as VCRs used to have a modulator in them which converted the video signal back into a UHF signal the analog TV could decode - but I've never seen such an output on a digital box (it would daft be daft) - and if they did have, they would still work post-switchover.

    You assume the aerial cable is more than adequate - I've provided good reason why many older cables are not and they can result in intermittent picture. If it works fine then no problem - if the picture has dropout and a low signal strength, a new cable can be a very good (and cheap) investment.

    jah128;6504782

    What the hell are you talking about?



    That's not nice either.


    jah128;6507433

    Freeview boxes/sky boxes/cable boxes don't output on coax anyway.



    That's enought for me.
    End of discussion.

    deek72;6507535

    That's enought for me.End of discussion.



    I don't get your point, but if you're not brave enough to debate it so be it...

    jah128;6507553

    I don't get your point, but if you're not brave enough to debate it so be … I don't get your point, but if you're not brave enough to debate it so be it...



    My point is that FV/Sky/Cable all have RF output so the fact that you are so completely wrong on such a basic point means I can see I'd be wasting my time debating it with you.

    deek72;6507600

    My point is that FV/Sky/Cable all have RF output so the fact that you are … My point is that FV/Sky/Cable all have RF output so the fact that you are so completely wrong on such a basic point means I can see I'd be wasting my time debating it with you.



    No they don't! Most freeview boxes have an aerial pass-through connection - but very few have an RF output (ie decode the digital signal and modulate the composite output on the RF cable). The pass through is solely so the aerial can be piggy-backed into the analogue TV (or VCR) for analogue reception. I've had several freeview boxes and cable boxes and none modulate the signal onto the RF out - I don't have Sky but I'd be surprised if Sky Digital boxes did also. The RF aerial signal goes into the box and is decoded into composite video using the SCART/SVideo/Composite outputs (and in more modern boxes component video, HDMI etc) - but not converted back into a UHF TV signal like it was on most VCRs (I guess a few digiboxes might do this for those with televisions without any sort of video input, but these are certainly going to be exceptions to the rule...)

    deek72;6507535

    That's not nice either.



    I said that because your comment didn't (and still doesn't) make any sense. You accuse me of 'scaremongering' for suggesting that replacing the cable, if its unscreened coax, might be a good idea - then suggest that 99% of people have no problems and just need to use a scart cable between the digibox and TV. This is nonsense - hence my comment - and shows you don't really know what you are talking about (yet you seem happy and quick to ridicule those that do). If you had a digibox which decoded the digital signal and then remodulated the output onto an RF cable - why would you need to change to SCART when the switchover occurs? An analogue TV will still be able to decode a modulated RF TV signal after the switchover - its just they won't be transmitted OTA after that date.

    I'm sorry if you misinterpreted my comment to read that 'everyone must upgrade their equipment' but I didn't imply anything of the sort. Its a fact that many people have poor/intermittent digital television reception, and its a fact that digital signal is presently much weaker than it will be when the switchover occurs (hence my catch-22 comment).

    jah128;6507751

    No they don't! Most freeview boxes have an aerial pass-through … No they don't! Most freeview boxes have an aerial pass-through connection - but very few have an RF output (ie decode the digital signal and modulate the composite output on the RF cable). The pass through is solely so the aerial can be piggy-backed into the analogue TV (or VCR) for analogue reception. I've had several freeview boxes and cable boxes and none modulate the signal onto the RF out - I don't have Sky but I'd be surprised if Sky Digital boxes did also. The RF aerial signal goes into the box and is decoded into composite video using the SCART/SVideo/Composite outputs (and in more modern boxes component video, HDMI etc) - but not converted back into a UHF TV signal like it was on most VCRs (I guess a few digiboxes might do this for those with televisions without any sort of video input, but these are certainly going to be exceptions to the rule...)I said that because your comment didn't (and still doesn't) make any sense. You accuse me of 'scaremongering' for suggesting that replacing the cable, if its unscreened coax, might be a good idea - then suggest that 99% of people have no problems and just need to use a scart cable between the digibox and TV. This is nonsense - hence my comment - and shows you don't really know what you are talking about (yet you seem happy and quick to ridicule those that do). If you had a digibox which decoded the digital signal and then remodulated the output onto an RF cable - why would you need to change to SCART when the switchover occurs? An analogue TV will still be able to decode a modulated RF TV signal after the switchover - its just they won't be transmitted OTA after that date. I'm sorry if you misinterpreted my comment to read that 'everyone must upgrade their equipment' but I didn't imply anything of the sort. Its a fact that many people have poor/intermittent digital television reception, and its a fact that digital signal is presently much weaker than it will be when the switchover occurs (hence my catch-22 comment).



    Hey, you know what? I hold my hands up and say I was wrong here. Idon't know what I was thinking about, well I do, actually. What I thought I was saying was that come the analogue switch off all you need to buy is a freeview box and a scart cable (providing you have a tv with scart socket). See, I have been advising one or two local OAP neighbours (tv only - no freeview or anything) who were worried sick that they would have no tv to watch without spending £100's on new tv's and other equipment.
    Quite how I interpreted your posts to be contradicting my thoughts I can't quite explain.
    Anyway, hands up and my sincere apologies for insulting you, :thumbsup:

    deek72;6512560

    Hey, you know what? I hold my hands up and say I was wrong here. Idon't … Hey, you know what? I hold my hands up and say I was wrong here. Idon't know what I was thinking about, well I do, actually. What I thought I was saying was that come the analogue switch off all you need to buy is a freeview box and a scart cable (providing you have a tv with scart socket). See, I have been advising one or two local OAP neighbours (tv only - no freeview or anything) who were worried sick that they would have no tv to watch without spending £100's on new tv's and other equipment. Quite how I interpreted your posts to be contradicting my thoughts I can't quite explain.Anyway, hands up and my sincere apologies for insulting you, :thumbsup:



    Fair play, apology accepted, thanks for that. Its very unlikely they will have to spend £100's - and as it happens there are a few freeview boxes which do have modulators if they are stuck with a TV with no video in (not ]many but some do have - look for 'mod' in that list) - which will work in a telly without any video in (scart etc).

    The idea of replacing older unscreened coax isn't a myth or scaremongering at all though - if your in an area with decent enough analogue reception of your roof aerial but digital reception is poor and suffers from noisy/intermittent drop-out, swapping the old coax for a run of the newer stuff can give a big improvement. Once again, the catch-22 is that in areas where the digital reception is currently a little flaky, by all accounts once the analogue signal is switch off and the digital signal boosted the reception problems may be overcome anyway :thumbsup:
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