Replacing rusty leaking radiator

20
Posted 27th Dec 2019
Hi all - just noticed a radiator leaking water. There is rust in a corner and hole must be very small. The water leak is at random times.
Whats the best way to get a direct replacement, what do I need to measure etc,

Pic attached and TIA.

3375449-EnhzC.jpg
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Length by height, get someone to do it as I've just had my bathroom one replace and they have to drain down the whole system
Would i need to new valves or use existing?
Leave valves. They always rust at the bottom in bathrooms. Think it's the damp air. Measure. Buy same size.Use current valves. Hold the valves with knee against wrench while turning nut. Right side nut up. Left side down to undo
Edited by: "wayners" 27th Dec 2019
Where is the radiator located in your house?
your radiator will no doubt fit on the wall onto brackets so any replacement must have the same arrangement on the back if it is to fit exactly onto the existing wall brackets OR
you will have to move the brackets in the wall in order to match and fit your new radiator.

When it comes to fitting to your existing pipework/valves it is probably best to plan for the possibility that some adjustments may prove necessary.


All fine if you have the skills - a bummer if you dont.
mutley127/12/2019 12:58

Where is the radiator located in your house?


Hallway
Draining the entire system is simply not necessary at all. One rad can be replaced by closing the valves at either end, then loosening both ends at the rad and plugging it with your fingers/thumbs and finally flip it upside down as soon as it’s off the wall. Yes there will be some water leak, but if you do things carefully you won’t lose much at all. I’ve replaced several rads, and removed others to decorate using that method and it’s actually quite an easy thing to do. Most important thing is to ensure the valves are closed off properly and when removing the nuts, it’s best to use 2 spanners, 1 to hold the valve, otherwise you risk damaging the pipe work.
Diggsy27/12/2019 14:16

Draining the entire system is simply not necessary at all. One rad can be …Draining the entire system is simply not necessary at all. One rad can be replaced by closing the valves at either end, then loosening both ends at the rad and plugging it with your fingers/thumbs and finally flip it upside down as soon as it’s off the wall. Yes there will be some water leak, but if you do things carefully you won’t lose much at all. I’ve replaced several rads, and removed others to decorate using that method and it’s actually quite an easy thing to do. Most important thing is to ensure the valves are closed off properly and when removing the nuts, it’s best to use 2 spanners, 1 to hold the valve, otherwise you risk damaging the pipe work.


I also believe you need to tape the valve end before sticking together.
rimalpatel00727/12/2019 14:21

I also believe you need to tape the valve end before sticking together.


If you mean when transferring the nut and fitting to your new rad, then you’ll need PTFE tape to get a seal
Hi just measure the height and width of the radiator. Looks like you have plastic pipes so as long as it's not wider then the original it will be easy changeover. Simply close the valves on each side of the rad.
Remove and refit. As the pipes are plastic the valves will easy adjust to fit straight onto to the new rad.
You can double rad if you want more heat as that won't affect the fitment. Good luck
Horrible 8mm pipes yuck...
You may need to top up your inhibitor in the system when you’ve done
rimalpatel00727/12/2019 14:13

Hallway


Get a type 21 kudox premium from Screwfix. You need to measure the height and width of the existing radiator in cm.

If your radiator is very old, you won't get the same size and will need to get the plumber to do a bit of pipe work for the new radiator.
Ok I ordered exact size from Toolstation. Barlo Delta compact. toolstation.com/bar…308
Edited by: "rimalpatel007" 27th Dec 2019
Do you plan to change it yourself. I can post some links on YouTube with videos that could help you.
Definitely top up the inhibitor too as it stops the corrosion that would have caused the radiator to fail if it started internally.
kash201327/12/2019 23:32

Do you plan to change it yourself. I can post some links on YouTube with …Do you plan to change it yourself. I can post some links on YouTube with videos that could help you.


Sure. Thanks.pal.
I found a couple of these telescopic extension pieces invaluable when changing a radiator over a couple of months ago. I think the old radiator was imperial and new slightly smaller in metric, the extension pieces saved having to change the pipework. They come in 2 lengths, here is the longer one.
Edited by: "slamb" 28th Dec 2019
slamb28/12/2019 03:55

I found a couple of these telescopic extension pieces invaluable when …I found a couple of these telescopic extension pieces invaluable when changing a radiator over a couple of months ago. I think the old radiator was imperial and new slightly smaller in metric, the extension pieces saved having to change the pipework. They come in 2 lengths, here is the longer one.


Good point. Had to replace a bathroom rad 2-3 years ago and despite house being built around 2000 the rad was imperial! Unfortunately the metric ones wouldn't do (even with extensions) so had to buy the same rad at a cost of 3x the metric.
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