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Reusable nappies - your experiences - any help/advice?

Found 17th Nov 2008
Not that I'm a tree hugging ecowarrior or anything, but one of my friends recently had a baby and they are pumping something like 40 nappies a week into their bin - and thereafter onto our burgeoning landfill sites. I find this a bit crazy, and as we recycle a great deal, and have done so for years, it would go against the grain to just bin all this waste.

We've decided to have a go with reusable nappies, and have bought some Tots Bots nappies from eBay - 12 for £50 brand new - a good deal. My wife is due in February, but I like to be prepared!

I've read all the pros and cons and poorly investigated research comparing the use of disposables and reusables, and I remain convinced that resuables are the way forward on all fronts - with the possible exception of convenience.

The manufacturer recommends washing these at 60 - I reckon it would be ok to wash at 40, given the improvements to washing detergents etc, but I will confirm this with them.

So, to cut to the chase, does anyone have any experiences, good and bad, of using these? Any advice and info would be appreciated.

Cheers.

27 Comments

Surely you need to do them at 60 to kill the bacteria? Not just so they are clean...

they are great for being at home, not so great on the move and not so great if your baby wees alot during the night - on the whole though I would recomend them.

angelfairee;3489719

Surely you need to do them at 60 to kill the bacteria? Not just so they … Surely you need to do them at 60 to kill the bacteria? Not just so they are clean...



yeah I was thinking that, No way I would wash these at 40, even at a higher wash they can remain stained a little. Hope your all stocked up with plastic pants and liners as well

Original Poster

angelfairee;3489719

Surely you need to do them at 60 to kill the bacteria? Not just so they … Surely you need to do them at 60 to kill the bacteria? Not just so they are clean...




I don't think that there's any significant difference regards the two temps - when you think about what temperature you wash your hands at when you've been to the loo, it's certainly not in excess of 40 degrees.

That said, a great deal of bacteria wouldn't be killed even at 60, but it's the addition of the washing powder that enhances the cleaning ability, I'm just not sure by how much. Can't find any research on it.

Just a thought.

Original Poster

bellabonkers;3489724

they are great for being at home, not so great on the move and not so … they are great for being at home, not so great on the move and not so great if your baby wees alot during the night - on the whole though I would recomend them.



Yeah, we were thinking of using disposables on the move etc, but AFAIK you can use a booster for use at night for greater absorbancy.

How many wraps did you buy to go with them?

Oh - i forgot to say nappy rash can be a little more common with these types of nappies but if that happens just be prepared to switch to disposables for a day of so, the fact the draw the liquid away from babies bottom helps and use a good nappy cream, I recomend Metanium for any flare ups.

moob;3489780

I don't think that there's any significant difference regards the two … I don't think that there's any significant difference regards the two temps - when you think about what temperature you wash your hands at when you've been to the loo, it's certainly not in excess of 40 degrees.That said, a great deal of bacteria wouldn't be killed even at 60, but it's the addition of the washing powder that enhances the cleaning ability, I'm just not sure by how much. Can't find any research on it.Just a thought.



I just did a quick google and found this:

"Whatever you use, you will only need about 1 tablespoon of powder/liquid - a minute amount, compared to the manufacturer's recommendations! This is for two reasons: first, it is mostly the temperature of the water which kills any bacteria present in the cloth nappies, not detergent"

In relation to washing cloth nappies, from here:

plushpants.co.uk/cat…tml

moob;3489796

Yeah, we were thinking of using disposables on the move etc, but AFAIK … Yeah, we were thinking of using disposables on the move etc, but AFAIK you can use a booster for use at night for greater absorbancy.How many wraps did you buy to go with them?



I have to admit, never done any buying... I used to be a health care professional so just came across all sorts of nappies

yes but you would wash your hands using antibaterial soap which rids of germs!!

Only s boil wash would kill the germs on its own- but you can buy special washing powders in macro costco etc thats designed to kill germs etc @ 40!! :thumbsup:

My mum has had all 3 of us children in reusuable nappies, and They had no problems. My mum swears they prevent nappy rash and such brand as Pampers and Huggies tend to have chemicels which can lead to a serious nappy rash on sensitive bottoms.

cdemico;3489867

My mum has had all 3 of us children in reusuable nappies, and They had no … My mum has had all 3 of us children in reusuable nappies, and They had no problems. My mum swears they prevent nappy rash and such brand as Pampers and Huggies tend to have chemicels which can lead to a serious nappy rash on sensitive bottoms.



Some babies are sensitive to certain brands belive it or not - your right, same goes for baby wipes. Just a case of a little trial and error.

Original Poster

bellabonkers;3489802

Oh - i forgot to say nappy rash can be a little more common with these … Oh - i forgot to say nappy rash can be a little more common with these types of nappies but if that happens just be prepared to switch to disposables for a day of so, the fact the draw the liquid away from babies bottom helps and use a good nappy cream, I recomend Metanium for any flare ups.



Yeah, I've read that before, but someone from the council told me that conversely they are better at preventing nappy rash as the natural cotton adds to the breathability of the nappy and the child will soon let you know that it's wet so you can change it. The disposables have that gel like material that absorbs some of the moisture, but there's still a fair amount left over which causes rash.

Who knows for sure ehh?!:thinking:

Original Poster

angelfairee;3489822

I just did a quick google and found this:"Whatever you use, you will only … I just did a quick google and found this:"Whatever you use, you will only need about 1 tablespoon of powder/liquid - a minute amount, compared to the manufacturer's recommendations! This is for two reasons: first, it is mostly the temperature of the water which kills any bacteria present in the cloth nappies, not detergent"In relation to washing cloth nappies, from here:http://www.plushpants.co.uk/category/Cloth%20Nappies/sub_cat/Washing%20your%20cloth%20nappies.html



Dunno, I mean, I don't wanna sound like a know-it-all or anything, but I've studied Microbiology and from what I recall it's a combination of detergents and temperature to actuate the sanitisation of the bacteria, not merely the temperature alone.

moob;3489947

Dunno, I mean, I don't wanna sound like a know-it-all or anything, but … Dunno, I mean, I don't wanna sound like a know-it-all or anything, but I've studied Microbiology and from what I recall it's a combination of detergents and temperature to actuate the sanitisation of the bacteria, not merely the temperature alone.



I once complained about our water running too cold in the work place, I was told we had soap so all was well!!!! the cheek of them lol

Original Poster

foxymissroxy;3489844

yes but you would wash your hands using antibaterial soap which rids of … yes but you would wash your hands using antibaterial soap which rids of germs!! Only s boil wash would kill the germs on its own- but you can buy special washing powders in macro costco etc thats designed to kill germs etc @ 40!! :thumbsup:



Contrary to popular belief, antibac soap doesn't kill the lot - marginally more than standard soaps in fact...

The manufacturers of the nappies say 60 with a non-bio powder, so I'm guessing they've researched it rather well, given the way our society is today with everyone wanting to sue over x, y and z.

I'm just thinking that, given the recent promotion of washing at lower temps etc, the regular detergents would do the job at a lower temp.

I guess it's not my place to test it out on the little one, so I'd perhaps settle for washing pee containing nappies at 40 and poop ones at 60.

What about the Napisan powder you have to douse them in first, otherwise you will never get rid of the bacteria. I use both disposable and cotton nappies, but disposable win every time, the cotton ones are great when they are very tiny but are such hard work, especially in the winter!!

Original Poster

wendyak;3489981

What about the Napisan powder you have to douse them in first, otherwise … What about the Napisan powder you have to douse them in first, otherwise you will never get rid of the bacteria. I use both disposable and cotton nappies, but disposable win every time, the cotton ones are great when they are very tiny but are such hard work, especially in the winter!!



I want to use as few chemicals as I can get away with, no just for cost etc.

I'm kinda hoping that the weather might be ok in Feb to put out the nappies on the line - that's a bit hope considering I stay in Scotland lol!:whistling:

sorry but im using disposables, what about when you go out yucky
i know its not good for the envoiroment but until something better is on the market people will still be using disposable nappies

ilovepink;3490042

sorry but im using disposables, what about when you go out yucky i know … sorry but im using disposables, what about when you go out yucky i know its not good for the envoiroment but until something better is on the market people will still be using disposable nappies



Cloth nappies are a bit yuck but the ones you can buy that are pre shaped are pretty good now

Original Poster

ilovepink;3490042

sorry but im using disposables, what about when you go out yucky i know … sorry but im using disposables, what about when you go out yucky i know its not good for the envoiroment but until something better is on the market people will still be using disposable nappies



yeah, I'm gonna have to use them when we're out and about - totally accept that - there's no way I'm carrying around a sack of poo stained nappies in my hands!

Thing is, reusables are so much better than they used to be, now they've got elasticated legs etc - disposables are more for convenience, that said, there's no perfect solution to the flow of pee and poo!

ive never used them but thought about it with this one on its way, i dont know if this it true or not but ive been told that there great untill the baby starts moving around and you start the baby on proper food as the poo's get bigger and messier the nappies dont hold it in aswell...again i have no experience so i havent a clue if this is true

Have you looked at your local councils website as a lot now offer incentices to use washable nappies. I received 2 sample pack sof 10 nappies and another £10.00 voucher per child to use against purchase of nappies or a laundry services. My area now makes a small charge for the pack.

I used disposables at night but cloth during the day. I also used a laundry service that collected the used nappies once a week (you flush the disposable liners and solids away) and left the required amount for the following week. Even with twins this worked out at a little less than disposables.

I used kushies (which have great re sale value) and stuffables, where you put a terry nappie inside a fleece lined outer and seemed to fit better on my wriggly 1 year old. The stuffable were easier to dry.

Hope this helps

Original Poster

cymru2;3491190

Have you looked at your local councils website as a lot now offer … Have you looked at your local councils website as a lot now offer incentices to use washable nappies. I received 2 sample pack sof 10 nappies and another £10.00 voucher per child to use against purchase of nappies or a laundry services. My area now makes a small charge for the pack.I used disposables at night but cloth during the day. I also used a laundry service that collected the used nappies once a week (you flush the disposable liners and solids away) and left the required amount for the following week. Even with twins this worked out at a little less than disposables.I used kushies (which have great re sale value) and stuffables, where you put a terry nappie inside a fleece lined outer and seemed to fit better on my wriggly 1 year old. The stuffable were easier to dry.Hope this helps



Cheers for the info.

I don't think my local authority do the promo - but a neighbouring one does - typical eh?!

They are very good, been using the non-disposable nappies for 15 months now and all good, we also got the £50 from the council for using them. We get ours from our local Real Nappy Network, and were able to check various nappies before hand.

We have terry towels, Bambineo (Bamboo fibre, quick drying, Velcro fastening) and Tots Bots with several different colours and patterns in covers. Tots Bots fasten using a elastic Y-shaped grip which is fine.

we do use a disposable for night time but that's it and they save a hell of a lot of money, easy to wash at 40, no stains with a non-bio powder and a little white vinegar, also you can dry pail them.

Sets come usually in stage 1 and stage 2, the initial outlay can seem pricey but its worth it and they are kinder to your baby's skin overall. As for the inconvenience of them, its not really, you do a lot of washing with a baby anyway so doing a load of nappies is not that much of an extra burden.

You will need lots of liners and its easy to forget them, get lots.

Original Poster

Alfonse;3495371

They are very good, been using the non-disposable nappies for 15 months … They are very good, been using the non-disposable nappies for 15 months now and all good, we also got the £50 from the council for using them. We get ours from our local Real Nappy Network, and were able to check various nappies before hand.We have terry towels, Bambineo (Bamboo fibre, quick drying, Velcro fastening) and Tots Bots with several different colours and patterns in covers. Tots Bots fasten using a elastic Y-shaped grip which is fine. we do use a disposable for night time but that's it and they save a hell of a lot of money, easy to wash at 40, no stains with a non-bio powder and a little white vinegar, also you can dry pail them.Sets come usually in stage 1 and stage 2, the initial outlay can seem pricey but its worth it and they are kinder to your baby's skin overall. As for the inconvenience of them, its not really, you do a lot of washing with a baby anyway so doing a load of nappies is not that much of an extra burden.You will need lots of liners and its easy to forget them, get lots.



Thanks for the info and your views on your experience - some good stuff there - have some rep!:thumbsup:

Gonna admit I copied this from my last post on real nappies as I'm a lazy soul at heart (and yes lazy and i still used real nappies lol.





ok the last major piece of reserch published was flawed it considered the norm for re usable napy users to use terries, wash at 90, use fabric softner, tumble dry and iron the nappies. they also assumed that most people wet pail nappies. Also only a very small number of Real nappy users were questioned (I think it was around 90 )

most of the time nappies are washed at 40 occationally 60, fabric softner is NOT used as it makes the nappies less absorbant, I only finnished mine off in the dryer but this may depend on the type of nappy you choose some take forever to line dry, and I've NEVER heard of anyone ironing nappies.

the shapped nappes such as tots,minki motherease etc all have elastic in them as well as that some have PUL backing (the waterproof bit!) you wash that higher than 60 and you may as well just leave a baby naked cos its only gonna destry it and leak.

The problem with ironing nappes (again I'm just thinking of terries and prefolds here) is that your compressing the fibers again reducing absorbancy. You could iron them but I don't know many that would so its not really faor for that to have been taken into consideration in the study.

most nappy users use viniger as a softner insted of condioner by the way

We used them on AM successfully and wouldn't hesitate to use 'em again.

Some advice -
Don't buy a birth to potty pack untill you know that the nappies suit your child.

Decide if you want to a shapped nappy and then decide if you want to use a seperate wrap or use an all in one.

You don't have to use plastic pants anymore lol

if you need anything or have any questions no matter how trivial PM me I was a real nappy rep and I'm happy to give any advice I can.


Edit here are some links that may be useful to discussions on here

hotukdeals.com/ite…le/
hotukdeals.com/ite…re/

Original Poster

Don't wanna burst your bubbles Jenny (geddit?) but I've already read your informative advice - thanks again though!

By the way, does anyone else have problems giving rep at times - what happens is when I click on the rep icon, the box appears then I move my cursor over to it and it vanishes - it's like it's taking the ****!
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