Router Extenders

11
Posted 18th Jun 2020
Is there any inexpensive reliable router extenders available, Up to about £50.00.
I want to work in the garden and at times I am loosing my WiFi.
Thank you
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Get the mesh routers. Google mesh if you can afford it, otherwise best bang for your buck would be the bt discs.
Extenders are quite old technology these days - would also recommend a mesh.

I went for a Tenda & been very happy with it on my 100mb Virgin connection.

Oftens deals such as this one

hotukdeals.com/dea…254
MLD918/06/2020 10:41

Extenders are quite old technology these days - would also recommend a mesh


They're the same thing. Mesh capability just means the extenders can route data through each other dynamically instead of being connected to a single other unit. They're useful in a volume of space for getting around objects that absorb radio waves.

For a an application like this where you're just after more distance it won't help.
EndlessWaves18/06/2020 10:56

They're the same thing. Mesh capability just means the extenders can route …They're the same thing. Mesh capability just means the extenders can route data through each other dynamically instead of being connected to a single other unit. They're useful in a volume of space for getting around objects that absorb radio waves. For a an application like this where you're just after more distance it won't help.


If the Mesh routers are Ethernet connected it will help a lot as the nearest Mesh router will be connected at the same speed as the main router. Mesh routers also use the same SSID allowing handoff between Mesh points whereas many (not all) extenders need to use there own SSID.

which is better for the OP really depends on the layout of the OP's home.
Edited by: "Uridium" 18th Jun
EndlessWaves18/06/2020 10:56

They're the same thing. Mesh capability just means the extenders can route …They're the same thing. Mesh capability just means the extenders can route data through each other dynamically instead of being connected to a single other unit. They're useful in a volume of space for getting around objects that absorb radio waves. For a an application like this where you're just after more distance it won't help.


Mesh doesn't half your data
how viable would it be for your situation to place a spare old router near the garden and connected via long ethernet cabe to your existing router?
Another option overlooked by many is that mobile phones often have a WiFi chipset with better range than most laptops.

Check the WiFi signal on your phone in the location you are struggling to connect on your laptop. If the signal is stronger on the phone you can tehter to the Phone over Bluetooth and share the Phone's WiFi connection
EndlessWaves18/06/2020 10:56

They're the same thing. Mesh capability just means the extenders can route …They're the same thing. Mesh capability just means the extenders can route data through each other dynamically instead of being connected to a single other unit. They're useful in a volume of space for getting around objects that absorb radio waves. For a an application like this where you're just after more distance it won't help.



Mesh and extenders are not the same thing:

As you can see, the difference between the two is that Wi-Fi extenders are used to rebroadcast your home router's Wi-Fi signal. ... Mesh Wi-Fi uses multiple nodes to create a single, big and seamless Wi-Fi network that covers your whole home.

eu.dlink.com/uk/…ter
If you want a cheap option you can set up an old router as an extender. Once set up put it in a location nearer the garden, it picks up your WiFi signal and then bounces it on ..... it will reduce / half your speed when connected to that network though.

I use this just to get WiFi onto my garage at the end of the garden and works fine for what I need and cost me nothing except some googling to set it up
Personator123418/06/2020 13:11

Mesh and extenders are not the same thing:As you can see, the difference …Mesh and extenders are not the same thing:As you can see, the difference between the two is that Wi-Fi extenders are used to rebroadcast your home router's Wi-Fi signal. ... Mesh Wi-Fi uses multiple nodes to create a single, big and seamless Wi-Fi network that covers your whole home.https://eu.dlink.com/uk/en/resource-centre/blog/wifi-extender-vs-mesh-wifi-which-is-better


As far as I'm aware Wi-fi extenders are not rebroadcast devices except in the sense that any piece of networking hardware is, that's just a metaphor to help explain their typical use. They're access points that are connected to the router with a wi-fi connection. If you look in your router's control panel the wi-fi extender will show up as a device which shows it has an independent wi-fi connection to the router. If it were just acting as a signal booster you'd see only your devices listed.

A seamless network is just when all your access points share the same name (SSID) which almost everything is capable of. Older range extenders sometimes defaulted to a different one, but that fashion is changing and even they could often be configured to be the same.

Uridium18/06/2020 11:38

If the Mesh routers are Ethernet connected it will help a lot as the …If the Mesh routers are Ethernet connected it will help a lot as the nearest Mesh router will be connected at the same speed as the main router. Mesh routers also use the same SSID allowing handoff between Mesh points whereas many (not all) extenders need to use there own SSID.which is better for the OP really depends on the layout of the OP's home.



If they're connected via ethernet then they're not operating as a mesh unless you also have ethernet connection between them (which most don't support, they're only capable of forming a mesh network over wi-fi). You could have bought access points with just an ethernet connection that would do the same job.


mtsk18/06/2020 12:31

Mesh doesn't half your data


The cheaper mesh supporting units do have exactly the same 50% re-transmission penalty. Here's an article from netgear advertising their high end product pointing that out:
smallnetbuilder.com/wir…esh

It's an implementation detail down to whether it has multiple radios or not, not something that distinguishes different categories of networking kit.

To avoid that you need a unit with an additional radio dedicated to communicating with the router. These are sometimes known as dual band units if you're only using one frequency or tri band if you're using both 2.4Ghz and 5Ghz for your devices.


I'm not saying don't go for a system-type setup, they can have advantages in terms of ease of setup and the mesh aspect can help coverage when using multiple units. But they're not something entirely new as they're sometimes portrayed as being.


In terms of specific products it is a market where the cheap stuff just doesn't work very well so you really want to be looking at the top of your budget. TP-link's RE650 seems to have gotten wide acclaim. It's £70 but maybe next time ebay or amazon offer a £10/15% voucher it'd be close enough to budget.

The other thing to consider is placement. Anything with a wireless connection to your router needs to be placed where the signal to the router is the same strength as the signal from the area you want to cover to the extender. You can't just drop it down next to where you're sitting or next to the router and expect it to do anything.
EndlessWaves18/06/2020 15:06

If they're connected via ethernet then they're not operating as a mesh …If they're connected via ethernet then they're not operating as a mesh unless you also have ethernet connection between them (which most don't support, they're only capable of forming a mesh network over wi-fi). You could have bought access points with just an ethernet connection that would do the same job.


I'm using Google WiFi which does support that.

I pretty much see my full VM 350Mbps over Wifi anywhere in the house. (and its an old Solid brick 4 bed with no Stud walls)

The trick to setting up Google WiFi with Ethernet is to first setup as wireless only to create the Mesh, once this is done you then introduce Ethernet between the devices.
Edited by: "Uridium" 18th Jun
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