Sainsbury's to cut thousands of store jobs - BBC News

56
Found 23rd Jan
bbc.co.uk/new…079

Quote:
"Sainsbury's is to cut thousands of store management jobs in a major shake-up of its business.

The changes involve axing a number of managerial posts in its supermarket and convenience stores across the UK.

Sainsbury's would not confirm the number of employees affected by the move but said it was "in the thousands".

On Monday, the UK's biggest supermarket chain, Tesco, announced it was cutting 1,700 shop floor management jobs.

Like other the major grocers, Sainsbury's is trying to cut costs and simplify its plans to save £500m over the next three years.

Earlier this month, it confirmed it was "on track" to achieve £185m of cost savings this year, putting it ahead of target.

Sainsbury's, which jostles for position as the UK's second-biggest supermarket with Asda, has more than 1,400 stores in the UK.

The posts will be replaced by fewer, but mostly better paid, new management roles in each store.

Employees have the choice of either applying for these new roles or accepting a more junior position if unsuccessful. Otherwise they face redundancy."
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splatsplatsplat26 m ago

Are these companies not making any profit? Surely people's jobs should …Are these companies not making any profit? Surely people's jobs should come before share prices?


It might in a nice socialist/communist world but the harsh reality is that the sole purpose of a Public Limited Company like Tesco or Sainsbury's is to make the shareholders happy and give them a nice dividend.
splatsplatsplat42 m ago

Are these companies not making any profit? Surely people's jobs should …Are these companies not making any profit? Surely people's jobs should come before share prices?



PLC's are supposed to serve their shareholders best interests. They aren't a charity.
inb4...

everyone who uses self checkout and scan as you shop, this is your fault

if everyone tommorow just qued up at tills they will pannick and employ loads of staff, your food will go up a few pence, not £ like they make it out to be
Maybe the NHS should follow suit and get rid of the bloated managerial posts.
56 Comments
Are these companies not making any profit? Surely people's jobs should come before share prices?
splatsplatsplat26 m ago

Are these companies not making any profit? Surely people's jobs should …Are these companies not making any profit? Surely people's jobs should come before share prices?


It might in a nice socialist/communist world but the harsh reality is that the sole purpose of a Public Limited Company like Tesco or Sainsbury's is to make the shareholders happy and give them a nice dividend.
splatsplatsplat42 m ago

Are these companies not making any profit? Surely people's jobs should …Are these companies not making any profit? Surely people's jobs should come before share prices?



PLC's are supposed to serve their shareholders best interests. They aren't a charity.
How about Sainsburys cut their prices!

I always preferred sainsburys out of the big boys but often shopped at Waitrose for the nicer items. Sainsburys prices recently have been going up so much Waitrose is near on no different for branded items!
inb4...

everyone who uses self checkout and scan as you shop, this is your fault

if everyone tommorow just qued up at tills they will pannick and employ loads of staff, your food will go up a few pence, not £ like they make it out to be
Maybe the NHS should follow suit and get rid of the bloated managerial posts.
splatsplatsplat1 h, 23 m ago

Are these companies not making any profit? Surely people's jobs should …Are these companies not making any profit? Surely people's jobs should come before share prices?


Whats with the commie takeover in this and the Tesco thread?
I mean, I'm not exactly on the right wing of politics, but remarks like this and the ones from that Whelan guy on the Tesco thread make me feel like a Thatcher supporter in comparison.
airfix12 m ago

Maybe the NHS should follow suit and get rid of the bloated managerial …Maybe the NHS should follow suit and get rid of the bloated managerial posts.


What I've noticed with the NHS is that a lot of the lower paid non-medical roles seem to have been outsourced (think janitors, porters, security and other facilities/site staff).
This leaves a disproportionately high number of managerial roles, or roles that pay a high salary.
Those lower paid people are still around, but working for agencies or service supplier companies like Serco, Amey, g4s etc
Uranus23rd Jan

Whats with the commie takeover in this and the Tesco thread?I mean, I'm …Whats with the commie takeover in this and the Tesco thread?I mean, I'm not exactly on the right wing of politics, but remarks like this and the ones from that Whelan guy on the Tesco thread make me feel like a Thatcher supporter in comparison.


Are you having an identity crisis, Villa? Your views seem to be constantly evolving.
airfix33 m ago

Maybe the NHS should follow suit and get rid of the bloated managerial …Maybe the NHS should follow suit and get rid of the bloated managerial posts.



kingsfund.org.uk/pro…ers

"the NHS has a managerial workforce that is one-third the size" of other sectors/organisations.
Edited by: "Ellendel" 23rd Jan
miikeyblue23rd Jan

inb4...everyone who uses self checkout and scan as you shop, this is your …inb4...everyone who uses self checkout and scan as you shop, this is your faultif everyone tommorow just qued up at tills they will pannick and employ loads of staff, your food will go up a few pence, not £ like they make it out to be


To be fair part of the issue is customers changing behaviours over the years.

When I was a nipper, my mum went to bakers, greengrocers, butchers etc to do her shopping every day after work.
That changed into the Big shop, where you would get a week or months worth of food in one go at a superstore.
And now we are turning to convenience stores, budget supermarkets, with non traditional players such as Costco and B&M adding competition as well as online shopping instead of superstores.

Whats next? I imagine the supermarkets are working hard to anticipate and plan for that.
airfix55 m ago

Maybe the NHS should follow suit and get rid of the bloated managerial …Maybe the NHS should follow suit and get rid of the bloated managerial posts.


And BBC should follow suit as well.
There's a bit of a paradox involved with this kind of thing.

People generally seem to strive to live in a Roddenberry-esq world, where people can choose meaningful careers or swan around enjoying their lives, whilst their robotic servlings carry out the menial and otherwise more-suited tasks. At the same time, someone replaces a grunting checkout worker (or, in the case of Aldi, a pair of hands swiping your shopping down the conveyor-belt like cars down a flooded street in a tsunami) for a relatively efficient, IT-related solution, and everyone loses their minds.

In this particular case, it's about getting rid of multi-layered unnecessary management positions. It's flawed to think that every one of those roles is meaningful and filled by someone efficient and enthusiastic, though.
airfix1 h, 46 m ago

Maybe the NHS should follow suit and get rid of the bloated managerial …Maybe the NHS should follow suit and get rid of the bloated managerial posts.



Ha! Self-serve in the NHS; 'Here's the needle, knock yourself out'.
Don't forget, TESCO also:

bbc.co.uk/new…698

BHS as well, and ...

Hmmmmmmm (that's how the game goes at times I reckon?), enough said!. :-(
groenleader2 h, 20 m ago

How about Sainsburys cut their prices!I always preferred sainsburys out of …How about Sainsburys cut their prices!I always preferred sainsburys out of the big boys but often shopped at Waitrose for the nicer items. Sainsburys prices recently have been going up so much Waitrose is near on no different for branded items!


I'm confused!, with your philosophy in mind, how'd you explain £ Pound Shop's, and the 'user experience' from a customer perspective then?.

As them places (give or take), are generally cheap as chips! - as the Pound Shop terminology of their names obviously denotes such (and every one of those Pound Shop's are farrrrr from POOR?!.

But on a real - of the many many numerous times I've been in such £ Pound Shop's (as I'm sure that is probably the case with many other's too mind?), I can honestly swear that I never EVER went into even one of them, purely for the customer service 'experience' alone? (trust me on that one, looooool).

So the way I see it is this, by and large, customer service in this Country is sometimes light year's AHEAD of that of some other Countries around the World there?, so ...

In a nutshell, it allllll kind of depends on what you are kind of looking for basically?. :-)
tryn2help31 m ago

Ha! Self-serve in the NHS; 'Here's the needle, knock yourself out'.


After seeing some of the artwork the management of my local hospital spent thousands on, I'm not sure I'd want them anywhere near a sharp object.
groenleader3 h, 45 m ago

How about Sainsburys cut their prices!I always preferred sainsburys out of …How about Sainsburys cut their prices!I always preferred sainsburys out of the big boys but often shopped at Waitrose for the nicer items. Sainsburys prices recently have been going up so much Waitrose is near on no different for branded items!


Christ, this.

They built a Sainsbury's Local (if that's their branding) near a mate's recently. It's a couple of doors along from a Lidl, and I was curious to see what if was like, so I went in for some beer, chocolate croissants, and a couple of pizzas.

Lidl charge £4 for four cans of Innis & Gunn, 45p for a chocolate croissant, and £3.09 for a decent fresh pizza. Sainsbury's, which I did note was curiously bereft of customers while I visited, charge £6, 90p, and £4.50 respectively. So, an average of about 2/3rds more per product. Why would anyone pay that, when it's for the same or for comparable goods?
dxx41 m ago

Christ, this. They built a Sainsbury's Local (if that's their branding) …Christ, this. They built a Sainsbury's Local (if that's their branding) near a mate's recently. It's a couple of doors along from a Lidl, and I was curious to see what if was like, so I went in for some beer, chocolate croissants, and a couple of pizzas. Lidl charge £4 for four cans of Innis & Gunn, 45p for a chocolate croissant, and £3.09 for a decent fresh pizza. Sainsbury's, which I did note was curiously bereft of customers while I visited, charge £6, 90p, and £4.50 respectively. So, an average of about 2/3rds more per product. Why would anyone pay that, when it's for the same or for comparable goods?


Didn't you get their memo? Sainsbury's Local is for people who are too lazy or stupid to drive. That's reflected in the prices and anyone who disagrees should go out of town.

Seriously. They made a statement about Sainsbury's Local prices being so high and that was the jist of it. The bloke couldn't comprehend that some people don't drive.
Edited by: "MSK." 23rd Jan
Maybe they didn't need to buy argos if anything made it worse
Fat cat salaries, working people thrown like garbage, bonuses for the shareholders. Carillon, Tesco, Sainsburys, you are all the same. The relentless greedy bastards carry on...
I used to work in marksies food hall and we had 5 managers! all of them done nothing but hide in the office, seen one of them stack shelves for a bit on a busy xmas and not one did the till when we were up the wall, a lot of these managers are a waste of space.
themachman15 m ago

I used to work in marksies food hall and we had 5 managers! all of them …I used to work in marksies food hall and we had 5 managers! all of them done nothing but hide in the office, seen one of them stack shelves for a bit on a busy xmas and not one did the till when we were up the wall, a lot of these managers are a waste of space.


Until it comes to accountability, at which stage you are generally safe and your manager is not.
aj20011 h, 39 m ago

Maybe they didn't need to buy argos if anything made it worse


They bought it for it's distribution network and it is actually doing well. People are ordering from it and choosing to pick up from their local Sainsbury's store at a time to suit them. I ordered something after midnight and it was at the local store by 2pm.
By relocating some of the Argos shops in the larger supermarkets, Sainsbury's are increasing footfall. Yes, their prices are dear but if you like their food you will shop there, just like the senior citizens who go to their local M&S foodhall and remain loyal. It's called brand loyalty.
Once again, wages are seen as an evil and a cost which should be cut. I'm sure that I remember a time when people were valued for what they brought in to the business. For example someone earning £100 a week would almost certainly be making £150 (usually more) a week of contribution to the company's income.
Now the accountants in charge of - especially the biggest - companies, who almost certainly won't be out of work themselves, are quite happy to curtail the working lives of people who may have contributed for many years.

The need for ever increasing profit is horrible, no longer are businesses happy to earn a good living and maintain standards by doing what they do. They now just keep selling and selling and cutting staff (making the rest work too hard). Then cutting pack weights and sizes, then reducing less profitable aspects of what they do and then selling and marketing more usually until they implode. Just to make more than they did last year, so one or 2 people can justify their positions. Even if a few thousand people end up on the scrapheap.

I'm,going to call this 'Mike's Law' (after me)
"The bigger and richer the organisation, the less it cares about the people who worked for it and helped it to be big and rich"

Actually banks are the best at this.
studyform1 h, 58 m ago

Once again, wages are seen as an evil and a cost which should be cut. I'm …Once again, wages are seen as an evil and a cost which should be cut. I'm sure that I remember a time when people were valued for what they brought in to the business. For example someone earning £100 a week would almost certainly be making £150 (usually more) a week of contribution to the company's income.Now the accountants in charge of - especially the biggest - companies, who almost certainly won't be out of work themselves, are quite happy to curtail the working lives of people who may have contributed for many years.The need for ever increasing profit is horrible, no longer are businesses happy to earn a good living and maintain standards by doing what they do. They now just keep selling and selling and cutting staff (making the rest work too hard). Then cutting pack weights and sizes, then reducing less profitable aspects of what they do and then selling and marketing more usually until they implode. Just to make more than they did last year, so one or 2 people can justify their positions. Even if a few thousand people end up on the scrapheap.I'm,going to call this 'Mike's Law' (after me)"The bigger and richer the organisation, the less it cares about the people who worked for it and helped it to be big and rich"Actually banks are the best at this.


This is because we live in a time of unprecedented corporate greed.
studyform10 h, 33 m ago

Once again, wages are seen as an evil and a cost which should be cut. I'm …Once again, wages are seen as an evil and a cost which should be cut. I'm sure that I remember a time when people were valued for what they brought in to the business. For example someone earning £100 a week would almost certainly be making £150 (usually more) a week of contribution to the company's income.Now the accountants in charge of - especially the biggest - companies, who almost certainly won't be out of work themselves, are quite happy to curtail the working lives of people who may have contributed for many years.The need for ever increasing profit is horrible, no longer are businesses happy to earn a good living and maintain standards by doing what they do. They now just keep selling and selling and cutting staff (making the rest work too hard). Then cutting pack weights and sizes, then reducing less profitable aspects of what they do and then selling and marketing more usually until they implode. Just to make more than they did last year, so one or 2 people can justify their positions. Even if a few thousand people end up on the scrapheap.I'm,going to call this 'Mike's Law' (after me)"The bigger and richer the organisation, the less it cares about the people who worked for it and helped it to be big and rich"Actually banks are the best at this.




Careful, you'll be labelled a communist in this thread.
studyform10 h, 46 m ago

Once again, wages are seen as an evil and a cost which should be cut. I'm …Once again, wages are seen as an evil and a cost which should be cut. I'm sure that I remember a time when people were valued for what they brought in to the business. For example someone earning £100 a week would almost certainly be making £150 (usually more) a week of contribution to the company's income.Now the accountants in charge of - especially the biggest - companies, who almost certainly won't be out of work themselves, are quite happy to curtail the working lives of people who may have contributed for many years.The need for ever increasing profit is horrible, no longer are businesses happy to earn a good living and maintain standards by doing what they do. They now just keep selling and selling and cutting staff (making the rest work too hard). Then cutting pack weights and sizes, then reducing less profitable aspects of what they do and then selling and marketing more usually until they implode. Just to make more than they did last year, so one or 2 people can justify their positions. Even if a few thousand people end up on the scrapheap.I'm,going to call this 'Mike's Law' (after me)"The bigger and richer the organisation, the less it cares about the people who worked for it and helped it to be big and rich"Actually banks are the best at this.



People are valued for what they bring in to the business. But competition means lower prices, which means smaller margins which means cost cutting. Wages in menial jobs that really don't provide enough benefit over a faceless machine are easy to get rid of. Just wait til someone makes a cheap reliable robot that can stack the shelves and clear up spills, there won't be any staff left.
Edited by: "CoeK" 24th Jan
no mention of Brexit i'm dissapointed..

all these big companies will start laying off people, more will follow, unemployment will increase, meaning wages will go down..

mmmm....
whatyadoinsucka7 m ago

no mention of Brexit i'm dissapointed..all these big companies will start …no mention of Brexit i'm dissapointed..all these big companies will start laying off people, more will follow, unemployment will increase, meaning wages will go down..mmmm....



Looks like they have the option for applying for the new higher paying jobs or accepting a more junior position so it might not effect unemployment too much.

Middle management in my experience are usually a drain.
Uranus24th Jan

This is because we live in a time of unprecedented corporate greed.


The private mill and mine owners were much more generous (not forgetting all the slave owning civilisations) in the past.
shadey122 m ago

The private mill and mine owners were much more generous (not forgetting …The private mill and mine owners were much more generous (not forgetting all the slave owning civilisations) in the past.


Do you automatically take an opposing view on everything I write?
whatyadoinsucka11 m ago

no mention of Brexit i'm dissapointed..all these big companies will start …no mention of Brexit i'm dissapointed..all these big companies will start laying off people, more will follow, unemployment will increase, meaning wages will go down..mmmm....


Brexit will be a convenient excuse for getting shot, I know of one large organisation who is planning a re-stucture in Q3 this year to get rid of all the dead wood and it will all be blamed on brexit. Thats not the real reason its just a perfect opportunity to get rid of the staff who add no value.
DKLS5 m ago

Brexit will be a convenient excuse for getting shot, I know of one large …Brexit will be a convenient excuse for getting shot, I know of one large organisation who is planning a re-stucture in Q3 this year to get rid of all the dead wood and it will all be blamed on brexit. Thats not the real reason its just a perfect opportunity to get rid of the staff who add no value.


Agreed, these big companies its all a big boys club, as long as they copy their rivals and keep their own payrises they dont care on the whole. brexit is a great excuse
CoeK9 m ago

Looks like they have the option for applying for the new higher paying …Looks like they have the option for applying for the new higher paying jobs or accepting a more junior position so it might not effect unemployment too much.Middle management in my experience are usually a drain.


i hope so, its bad news big companies potentially laying off large numbers, as others tend to copy,
i noticed accountant salaries (west yorks) for newly qualified was similiar 10 years ago than some jobs ive seen advertised recently. which tells me alot of candidates for roles. (asda and morrisons had large restructures/redundancies in recent years)
Edited by: "whatyadoinsucka" 24th Jan
whatyadoinsucka2 m ago

i hope so, its bad news big companies potentially laying off large …i hope so, its bad news big companies potentially laying off large numbers, as others tend to copy,i noticed accountant salaries (west yorks) for newly qualified was similiar 10 years ago than some jobs ive seen advertised recently. which tells me alot of candidates for roles. (asda and morrisons had large restructures/redundancies in recent years)



Accountant salaries vary a lot, depends on what experience you have and what kind of accountant you are.
CoeK3 m ago

Accountant salaries vary a lot, depends on what experience you have and …Accountant salaries vary a lot, depends on what experience you have and what kind of accountant you are.


yeah, did you miss 'newly qualified' bit
Edited by: "whatyadoinsucka" 24th Jan
whatyadoinsucka1 m ago

yeah, did you miss 'newly qualified' bit



Newly qualified doesn't mean no experience.
Uranus24th Jan

Do you automatically take an opposing view on everything I write?


Just pointing out something you maybe failed to notice, people have always been greedy.
Maybe some people only surround themselves with agreeable media and have a distorted view of people and society in general.
If you had made that statement I would agree with you.
whatyadoinsucka20 m ago

Agreed, these big companies its all a big boys club, as long as they copy …Agreed, these big companies its all a big boys club, as long as they copy their rivals and keep their own payrises they dont care on the whole. brexit is a great excusei hope so, its bad news big companies potentially laying off large numbers, as others tend to copy,i noticed accountant salaries (west yorks) for newly qualified was similiar 10 years ago than some jobs ive seen advertised recently. which tells me alot of candidates for roles. (asda and morrisons had large restructures/redundancies in recent years)


West Yorks is a bit crap all round for salaries not just in accountancy, in my sector, they pay 20-50k less than London salaries. Hence I tend to mainly work with london based companies even If I have to commute to London from oop north, its a no brainer.

Plus all the interesting projects seem to be down there.
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