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Samsung NC10 (Netbook) Has A Part-Worn COA XP Sticker. Used Belarc Before I Reformatted, But It Says A Different Key?

10
Found 18th Jan 2014
As above. I have a well-loved but well-kept NC10 that I was planning to take to CEX.

I used Belarc before I reformatted to get the Key. This is what it said:
Microsoft Windows XP Home Edition Service Pack 3
Product Part No.: A**-****1
Installed from 'OEM' media.
Product ID: 7***7-OEM-*******-0***8 match to CD Key data
CD Key: X***2-2W***-****H-****T-C****
Computer Name: LOUISE
Registered Owner: Louise K
Registered Organization:

However, CEX noticed (I didn't!) that the Key on my Netbook is different to the one on the sticker!! A few digits are still visible on it. I was a bit taken aback!

Someone mentioned searching for the "i386" folder in My Computer and looking for "unattend.txt", which displays yet another key. But still not the same one as the COA sticker. However, I read on a forum this method is useless: "The key that's in the UNATTEND.txt file is generic, it's the same key on ALL XP discs".

I bought it from The Big Discount Store about four years ago (now-defunct ex-catalogue stock online store).

I tried a program called Keyfinder and it comes up with the same details as Belarc did.

Microsoft shrugged their shoulders and tried to sell me a new XP COA for $40 :(! Samsung just said "Call Microsoft". I have the Samsung XP Recovery CD-Rom (with no keys or serials printed on it) and Samsung Driver CD-Rom.

Have I no options left? Thank you
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10 Comments
scrub rest of Coa off bottom and go to other cex? or say that it is from win98 and you upgraded to xp yourself?
The guy in CEX says that they check the COA on computers before putting them up for sale, in case the OS gets gimped further down the line, which means unhappy customers returning them.

That's fine by me but the Netbook is definitely mine, not been tampered with and I can't work out why the correct COA isn't coming up
This is from a Vista user, but may shed some light (?):

social.microsoft.com/For…sta

The reason the product key being used by Windows is different then the one on the sticker is Computers, which are built by large manufacturers that come with Windows Pre-Installed, come with two (2) Product Keys:
A) OEM SLP: This key comes pre-installed in Windows, when it comes from the Factory. This key is geared to work with the special instructions found only on that Manufacturer's computer hardware. So when Windows was installed using the OEM SLP key (at the factory) Vista looks at the motherboard and sees the special instructions and Self-Activates. (that's why you did not need to Activate your computer after you brought it home)

B) COA SLP: This is the Product key that you see on the sticker on the side (or bottom) of your computer. It is a valid product key, but should only be used in limited situations (such as if the OEM SLP key stops self-activating for whatever reason). The key must be activated by Phone. (Note: All manufacturers that use the OEM SLP system are required by contract to include a Certificate of Authenticity (COA) sticker, that has a COA SLP key, on the computer).

As for the unreadable COA SLP key, the best I can do is direct you to support doc KB 811224 "How to identify, locate, and replace a product key" support.microsoft.com/kb/…224 (typically, it's a dead link now).
That's why it's a good idea when you buy a new laptop to put some Sellotape over the COA sticker to prevent it being erased.
I've taken pictures of the sticker (some of the barcode still visible) and emailed Microsoft..some have said if they can read the whole barcode they can decipher it and reply with the COA code.

Any other information they want from me, I'm happy to give them. Worth a try, anyway.

Another solution I saw was to rub a little bit of acrylic paint (?), though personally I'd use something like charcoal, really lightly, over the sticker, to pick up the embossed sections. Depends how damaged the sticker is, of course.
Madwak55

That's why it's a good idea when you buy a new laptop to put some … That's why it's a good idea when you buy a new laptop to put some Sellotape over the COA sticker to prevent it being erased.

My NC10 was my first foray into laptops, I've had tons of desktops in the past...for me the COA sticker being indecipherable was never an issue.
As previosly stated it will be a generic key used for the origional install and places like cex should be well aware of this.
arachnoid

As previosly stated it will be a generic key used for the origional … As previosly stated it will be a generic key used for the origional install and places like cex should be well aware of this.

I said that last night: surely CEX must encounter LOTS of computers that have the COA sticker gone? It's very common in PC repair centres.

I got the feeling CEX are going to dig in their heels around this, but I'll give it a few days and see if I can find a solution.
Also, I put sellotape on the COA of my new laptop, and on my boyfriend's Lesson learned, eh
Thanks, Terrabytes
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