Should I fast charge a mobile phone battery?

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Found 9th Sep 2017
My Elephone P8000 eventually died after 2 years of constant use. The battery now lasts 2 hours at most. I've replaced it with a Ulefone Power 2 which I'm really happy with. I'd be happy with 2 years also but it got me thinking.

The Ulefone comes with a fast charger that can charge the massive battery up in around an hour or so (I've never timed it). I do a bit of developing so I've usually the phone connected to my PC which gives it a slow trickle charge and I've been leaving the phone connected overnight and it's charged in the morning.

I'm curious though if this is a wise decision? I've heard that overcharging ruins a battery but so does fast charging. Are both statements correct? Would I be better charging every other day (I easily get 2 days from the battery).

Although I'd be happy with 2 years, I'd still be using my Elephone if it lasted a day.

Thanks in advance for any response.
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Think if you ask 3 people you will get 3 different answers. Heard a battery guy on a tech podcasts explaining about batteries and charging. To much for me to type up but the basics are. Don't go from flat 0% to 100% if you can help it, but this will happen a few times as it can't be helped. Fast charging is fine if you need to juice up battery but slow charging will help the battery last a little longer... Maybe... Some say not... as the heat kills them off. Not much you can do to extend battery life as the hardware will control it, fast charging or not. It's a lottery to how long the battery will last but 500 charge cycles and it may die. Day 1 charge 40% to 100% = 60%. Day 2 60% to 100= 40%... Add the 2 figures and you get 100% so 1 full charge cycle over the 2 days . This gives the battery a life span of about 3 years to which you need to get a new phone anyway. Maybe.... Just use phone day to day and don't worry about it. Use fast charging when needed. That's the advice.
Oh. He also said it's fine to leave in the charger plugged in over night. Again the hardware will protect battery. That's what I do.
I was very happy with the Elephone, I only upgraded because the battery knackered itself so I'd still be using it if I could. I charged it daily so can't really complain with 600+ charges. I knew a phone battery was only good for 300-500 charges.

I need a full day battery for an app I've built but as these phones have built in batteries and I'm not great at micro electronics, I don't want to be buying a phone every 2 years.

Thanks btw
Yeah. But if you charge every day. 365 plug Ins per year that only = 200 ish charge cycles. Some batteries can die for no reason while others go on and on.. It's a lottery to which there is no answer. You want a good phone then lg g5 se. £288..bought one for Mrs as she wanted good camera. That's has swappable battery to. Bit much to pay?
Edited by: "wayners" 9th Sep 2017
wayners12 m ago

Yeah. But if you charge every day. 365 plug Ins per year that only = 200 …Yeah. But if you charge every day. 365 plug Ins per year that only = 200 ish charge cycles. Some batteries can die for no reason while others go on and on.. It's a lottery to which there is no answer. You want a good phone then lg g5 se. £288..bought one for Mrs as she wanted good camera. That's has swappable battery to. Bit much to pay?


Just bought an Elefone Power 2 last month, 6000Ma battery but it's fixed so if I've problems I have to do open heart surgery. I won't be buying a new phone unless it bricks. I hope for 2 years out of this but I'd like to extend it's life if I could, hence my question.
Ah. OK. Well to answer. No way to extend life other than try to avoid 0—100% charges. Just use and fingers crossed
With the newer fast chargers it uses a higher voltage and doesn't just crank the current up. Meaning it will charge cooler than just upping the current alone. I wouldn't be so concerned in theory fast charging does shorten the life of the battery.
Different battery chemistry behave differently. Electronics like phones are typically lithium cobalt/lithium polymer.

Overcharging is mainly an issue with NiCd batteries like AAs and so on.

Generally for lithium batteries inside devices the best way the things that cause degradation are charging/discharging them deeply (i.e. to 100%/0%), storing them at a high/low charge, charging them at a high current (fast charge) and keeping them hot.

So for a phone you should get the best life by trickle charging to 90% and if you're stationary doing development work it might be worth rigging up a fan to keep it cool (e.g. laptop cooling pad).
Charging is pretty intelligent these days, you cant overcharge, even fast charging will switch to trickle at the very end and switch off at 100%.

Fast charging still charges at a rate well below the manufactures specification.
A big factor of degradation for lithium batteries at least, is allowing the charge level to go to the extremes. It's a good idea to keep it within the 20-80% range as much as possible.
Thanks for the response guys. Now I've a new phone, I'm just looking to extend the life of the device. I get 2 days out of the battery so it's not a big deal but really appreciate the answers.
4Real201611 h, 34 m ago

Charging is pretty intelligent these days, you cant overcharge, even fast …Charging is pretty intelligent these days, you cant overcharge, even fast charging will switch to trickle at the very end and switch off at 100%.Fast charging still charges at a rate well below the manufactures specification.


I'm not sure what the flat lithium-polymer packs are typically rated for, but a popular lithium cylindrical cell like Panasonic's NCR18650b commonly used in slightly thicker electronics like power banks is rated for 1.625A@4.2v, so fast charging could definitely put more into the battery than the manufacturer recommends.
Note 4, get new batttery when dead
EndlessWaves2 h, 1 m ago

I'm not sure what the flat lithium-polymer packs are typically rated for, …I'm not sure what the flat lithium-polymer packs are typically rated for, but a popular lithium cylindrical cell like Panasonic's NCR18650b commonly used in slightly thicker electronics like power banks is rated for 1.625A@4.2v, so fast charging could definitely put more into the battery than the manufacturer recommends.


I was specifically talking about mobile phones with Quick Charge rating, they don't use batteries in those phones that aren't rated for that kind of charging.

I might as well quote Qualcomm

Can Quick Charge hurt my smartphone's battery?

"Quick Charge operates within the design parameters of batteries found in most smartphones. It is just charging the battery the way it is designed to be charged.

Device manufacturers build smartphones with a specific battery that can accept a specific level of charge. The battery size and maximum current of each battery are design decisions made by the manufacturer and can vary from smartphone to smartphone, tablet to tablet and so on.

However, traditional battery charging technology does not come close to the full power requirements of today's large batteries. Quick Charge is designed to allow device manufacturers to achieve the full rated capability of the batteries they choose while still meeting the performance and safety standards set by the battery manufacturer.
"
EndlessWaves4 h, 29 m ago

I'm not sure what the flat lithium-polymer packs are typically rated for, …I'm not sure what the flat lithium-polymer packs are typically rated for, but a popular lithium cylindrical cell like Panasonic's NCR18650b commonly used in slightly thicker electronics like power banks is rated for 1.625A@4.2v, so fast charging could definitely put more into the battery than the manufacturer recommends.



You are confusing dumb battery tech to smart charging techniques. Quick charging uses different voltages starting at 5v up to I think now with USB C tech 20v. The device negotiates with the charger using the onboard charging circuit to up this voltage to charge quicker higher voltage same current increases the power. It is smart enough to take into account the device battery temperature so it wouldn't exceed max limits. If it started to then it could scale back down (like the device is in sunlight or something like that.

its never going to put more into the battery than it can take because the system won't allow it. It's important to use only the original cable or one rated the same. it will probably stress the battery a little more but it is within the design limits
Dannyrobbo1 h, 12 m ago

You are confusing dumb battery tech to smart charging techniques. Quick …You are confusing dumb battery tech to smart charging techniques. Quick charging uses different voltages starting at 5v up to I think now with USB C tech 20v. The device negotiates with the charger using the onboard charging circuit to up this voltage to charge quicker higher voltage same current increases the power.


That's the connection between the power supply and the phone. Those higher voltages have to be dropped back to 3.7-4.2v again within the phone to charge the batteries, you can't directly apply 20V to a lithium battery
Definitely, the less time the battery is under stress from being charged, the better.

But definitely not, because fast charging will increase the stress that the battery's put under in the first place!

EndlessWaves3 h, 37 m ago

That's the connection between the power supply and the phone. Those higher …That's the connection between the power supply and the phone. Those higher voltages have to be dropped back to 3.7-4.2v again within the phone to charge the batteries, you can't directly apply 20V to a lithium battery



You are not right at all here, a battery will not care about the charging voltage within its designed limits it just has to be above the battery voltage. Ivoltage i just the potential required to provide current, it's not the voltage that charges the battery it's the current. With a higher voltage you can deliver more power with the same amount of current.
Dannyrobbo2 h, 54 m ago

You are not right at all here, a battery will not care about the charging …You are not right at all here, a battery will not care about the charging voltage within its designed limits it just has to be above the battery voltage. Ivoltage i just the potential required to provide current, it's not the voltage that charges the battery it's the current. With a higher voltage you can deliver more power with the same amount of current.


I'm not an electrical engineer, but surely the usual CC-CV charging method for lithium batteries requires a specific voltage?
EndlessWaves9 h, 58 m ago

I'm not an electrical engineer, but surely the usual CC-CV charging method …I'm not an electrical engineer, but surely the usual CC-CV charging method for lithium batteries requires a specific voltage?



With lithium batteries this is in two stages, constant current until voltage is correct, then constant voltage to get to 100% charge. It's not one operation. CC/CV is a really dated technique
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