Should we buy less online to support our local shops and economy ?

61
Found 8th Jun
less shops
Less jobs
Less tax council gets
More strain on services
increase crime
less money for councils to provide services
the big companies exploiting staff re pay and conditions
profits go abroad
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as someone who worked in a family retail business from the age of 12 to 25 that had been open for over 35 years, the problems today are not simply down to online sales, the problem has existed for the past 40 odd years. Supermarkets were the first major hit not them simply opening but the move to the what used to be called hyper stores, where they wanted to sell everything under one roof. One supermarket even put a blacksmith in to one of their stores in the late 80s early 90s when they opened in a country location. Their attitude was even back then, close down everything around them because people will come to us and thats what happened. Just look at how many butchers, bakers, green grocers (no candle stick makers) there were up to the early 80s.

The biggest issue on killing the high street has been the rise in charity shops, they tend to pay market rent, never negotiated rents down and do not pay rates. When other companies then went for their rent reviews the independent reviewers never took the fact they werent paying rates into account just that they could pay the rents. We ended up closing our family business after our rent went up by £10K as did most of the shops around it, ended up with a massive supermarket being built in its place.

For me personally career wise it was the best thing that happened as a youngster I thought long 16 hour days were the norm, not much money and certainly no holidays but my father thrived on it, at Christmas he even had to sleep in the shop as they were often targets for break ins with the added stock. Sadly within 10 years of the business closing we lost him, he was never the same after the shop closed.

Yes the death of the high street has been affected by e commerce but just think of it this way, the supermarkets and the likes are now suffering the same as they did to the smaller family run businesses and no matter how much you think we can go back to that it will never happen.
61 Comments
On Teesside we have 2 big towns close to each other Middlesbrough and Stockton on Tees, this year we have lost a massive Toys r us, M&S, Carpet right, Maplins, and the largest store in boro house of frazer, New Look, granger games there are about 3 pound world stores that may close.

The Teesside economy can not take these losses
Redcar also lost the Steel Works after 104yrs of production, could not compete with cheaper and inferior Chinese steel hat was a loss of 3,000+ jobs
To me shop local means support the smaller businesses not the big corporate ones. Thing is, there aren't any nearby. I would have to walk past Morrison's to reach my nearest corner shop to buy a more expensive pint of milk. Morrison's is a Bradford firm and I live in Bradford so I guess I'm supporting a local firm by shopping there. I'm not a big internet shopper but you can't beat it for convenience. Times they are a changing and all that.
Ok so my last visit over Xmas to House of Fraser I seen some boots for the wife - I thought I’m getting them quickly Googled the product and they were £20 off at another Shoe store so I clicked and collected from the store on my mobile there and then. The biggest issue is price/technology along with like this site help us but not them! Curry’s And John Lewis price match I think which may help them stay afloat. Shops don’t!
miles1361 h, 24 m ago

Redcar also lost the Steel Works after 104yrs of production, could not …Redcar also lost the Steel Works after 104yrs of production, could not compete with cheaper and inferior Chinese steel hat was a loss of 3,000+ jobs


My son the train freak made me drive the seventy odd miles to redcar once because of the specific level crossing gate they have at the station. A day in my life I will never get back. We did also visit the lifeboat museum and have a walk along the beach which was pleasant enough but as a day out it would not reach my top ten. He however was in nirvana
No

/thread
psychobitchfromhell40 m ago

My son the train freak made me drive the seventy odd miles to redcar once …My son the train freak made me drive the seventy odd miles to redcar once because of the specific level crossing gate they have at the station. A day in my life I will never get back. We did also visit the lifeboat museum and have a walk along the beach which was pleasant enough but as a day out it would not reach my top ten. He however was in nirvana


Just think this memory will always be remembered, but in time you'll reminisce and understand it wasn't a wasted journey. You got to spend a happy and memorable time with your son. He was overjoyed, and you were the best mother to him. (Reminds me a tiny bit of the song "If I walked 500 Miles" by the Proclaimers and "When somebody loved me" _ Sarah McLachlin).
O
nemesiz23 m ago

Just think this memory will always be remembered, but in time you'll …Just think this memory will always be remembered, but in time you'll reminisce and understand it wasn't a wasted journey. You got to spend a happy and memorable time with your son. He was overjoyed, and you were the best mother to him. (Reminds me a tiny bit of the song "If I walked 500 Miles" by the Proclaimers and "When somebody loved me" _ Sarah McLachlin).

Oh of course I agree. Every second is precious. I just wish it didn't all revolve around trains. My dad was a railway man so I guess it is in the blood.
Yes.

Will we ? no.
I am not in a position to afford this.
I will purchase from whomever is the cheapest and the most convenient.
Makes me feel a little bit bad, but I'm not wealthy enough to support more-expensive local firms.
Am not sure there is much that could be done, I think its too late shoppers buying habits have changed, shoppers are much better informed than ever before and those companies that can adapt their business models will always do well, those that don't, well they go the way of Toys R Us.

There is plenty of money to be made in retail if your offering is right.
The problem is 24/7 consumerism and convenience does not relate to a physical store very easily.

It costs me £2.30 to park in town for an hour, £3.50 for 2. The bus is £2.60 return but takes 20min longer each way to get into town.
Once I’m there, I might find nothing I am after. Even if I do, it will cost more or the returns options are greatly diminished.

Even if I stick to out of town locations. They are all chains, have poor infrastructure links and terrible car parks. That’s not even taking into account there is less choice without visiting multiple out of town locations.

It is much easier to stay at home. Do my research, compare prices and order. Sometimes for click and collect locally other straight delivery.

The online stores are all in physical locations that are cheap rates, no need to have retail setups to demo goods or staff standing about.

For footfall retail. We need lower rates, cheaper parking, better infrastructure, less fracture of locations, better rights and competition.
Yes, to your question. But it is a monumental task to change this without government level and business level of support to change. I think it is already in the point of no return because the money flow cannot be reversed without tremendous socia upheaval.

For further academic review and knowledge, read up on the economics of nations, amongst many, such as Maria Mazzucato's. Her main observational assessment is that big corporates' interests are wealth extraction and are not wealth creation. E.g, Barclay's Libor Rates , RBS stripping small business of their assets , Barclays Capital selling interest rate swaps...

Also, discuss with any (financial) accountant on how the shops in the "High Street", aka "bricks and mortar" in retail jargon, are stripped of their assets by private equity scheme. Read here Asset-Stripping by Private Equity Firms Is Booming and here Private equity firms are making a fortune stripping capital out of their companies ; toxic loans etc,

If you believed the messages, which sound excellent but is hidden toxic, that all financial services are great in London for the well-being of the nation, you could learn more from my suggestive links above and reflect , "Is this the wrong type of financial services in London" as an analogy to "the wrong type of leaves or snow". Private equity fund investment for creation of wealth is good, private equity fund investment for extraction is bad.

What can you do:-

Very minor, avoid buying imported stuff and consume less as a result, shop locally and buy locally made produce and services.
Discuss and actively urge your local politicians , to push the people's say up the line.
Edited by: "splender" 8th Jun
i Get what your saying and agree but my wallet doesn’t, if I can get cheap online I’ll buy online. I will miss House Of Fraser (Binns) as I’ll have to walk up to psyche now to buy a new top.
psychobitchfromhell9 h, 17 m ago

To me shop local means support the smaller businesses not the big …To me shop local means support the smaller businesses not the big corporate ones. Thing is, there aren't any nearby. I would have to walk past Morrison's to reach my nearest corner shop to buy a more expensive pint of milk. Morrison's is a Bradford firm and I live in Bradford so I guess I'm supporting a local firm by shopping there. I'm not a big internet shopper but you can't beat it for convenience. Times they are a changing and all that.



Solution: Buy a house closer to the corner shop. Use a local estate agent. Use a local solicitor. Use a local home removal Company.

Actual solution: Supermarkets (rather than out-of-town/retail park hypermarkets) will need to become the focal point of a high street; a new type of 'department store' that caters for a wide range of goods.

If they don't diversify & widen the scope of their product range &, for want of a better phrase, "move with the times", then the online shopping experience will always take precedence due to convenience.

That said, Tesco tried, & subsequently failed to compete with established e-Merchants that do offer a better experience (or better customer services):

[ hotukdeals.com/dis…675 ]

Even ordering groceries (from the major supermarkets) for home delivery is problematic from time-to-time, so if they cannot cater for their core business there is not really much hope that they can compete on a larger scale.

With Amazon's "Subscribe & Save" & "Pantry" initiatives, for instance, the traditional supermarket model is already in danger of competition from online retailers, so Supermarkets need to act & act now, before they become irrelevant.
as someone who worked in a family retail business from the age of 12 to 25 that had been open for over 35 years, the problems today are not simply down to online sales, the problem has existed for the past 40 odd years. Supermarkets were the first major hit not them simply opening but the move to the what used to be called hyper stores, where they wanted to sell everything under one roof. One supermarket even put a blacksmith in to one of their stores in the late 80s early 90s when they opened in a country location. Their attitude was even back then, close down everything around them because people will come to us and thats what happened. Just look at how many butchers, bakers, green grocers (no candle stick makers) there were up to the early 80s.

The biggest issue on killing the high street has been the rise in charity shops, they tend to pay market rent, never negotiated rents down and do not pay rates. When other companies then went for their rent reviews the independent reviewers never took the fact they werent paying rates into account just that they could pay the rents. We ended up closing our family business after our rent went up by £10K as did most of the shops around it, ended up with a massive supermarket being built in its place.

For me personally career wise it was the best thing that happened as a youngster I thought long 16 hour days were the norm, not much money and certainly no holidays but my father thrived on it, at Christmas he even had to sleep in the shop as they were often targets for break ins with the added stock. Sadly within 10 years of the business closing we lost him, he was never the same after the shop closed.

Yes the death of the high street has been affected by e commerce but just think of it this way, the supermarkets and the likes are now suffering the same as they did to the smaller family run businesses and no matter how much you think we can go back to that it will never happen.
I feel like a lot of shops just have foreign workers and the profits go straight to the likes of Mike Ashley.

I do buy British, knives and forks from Sheffield, shoes and clothes, even the material for my jacket is milled and grown here.

It can be hard to get stuff like phones on the High ST. everywhere feels like I con. Feels like its old and out of touch. Stores that I am paying over the odds to shop in b/c "that's how people bought stuff in the olden days".

When I go online and get it for £20 - £30 from Amazon or something way better from chinadirect or whatever.
Edited by: "groenleader" 8th Jun
eslick2 h, 11 m ago

as someone who worked in a family retail business from the age of 12 to 25 …as someone who worked in a family retail business from the age of 12 to 25 that had been open for over 35 years, the problems today are not simply down to online sales, the problem has existed for the past 40 odd years. Supermarkets were the first major hit not them simply opening but the move to the what used to be called hyper stores, where they wanted to sell everything under one roof. One supermarket even put a blacksmith in to one of their stores in the late 80s early 90s when they opened in a country location. Their attitude was even back then, close down everything around them because people will come to us and thats what happened. Just look at how many butchers, bakers, green grocers (no candle stick makers) there were up to the early 80s. The biggest issue on killing the high street has been the rise in charity shops, they tend to pay market rent, never negotiated rents down and do not pay rates. When other companies then went for their rent reviews the independent reviewers never took the fact they werent paying rates into account just that they could pay the rents. We ended up closing our family business after our rent went up by £10K as did most of the shops around it, ended up with a massive supermarket being built in its place. For me personally career wise it was the best thing that happened as a youngster I thought long 16 hour days were the norm, not much money and certainly no holidays but my father thrived on it, at Christmas he even had to sleep in the shop as they were often targets for break ins with the added stock. Sadly within 10 years of the business closing we lost him, he was never the same after the shop closed. Yes the death of the high street has been affected by e commerce but just think of it this way, the supermarkets and the likes are now suffering the same as they did to the smaller family run businesses and no matter how much you think we can go back to that it will never happen.



My suburb is full of coffee shops and charity shops, they are the consequence of "free market forces" that politicians and economists talk about. Free market forces have negative and positive effects like free benefits, free movement of people, free anything...

The most beautiful, newest shop in my area is a charity shop. They are unsustainable retail shops made economically viable, say using the rental amount as cost to business, because they get volunteers, donations and conform to charitable legistations.

Example references to how unviable businesses become viable...

A Review of Charitable Spending By UK Charities ( Average Spending on Charitable Activities As % Income Over Last Three Financial Year : 1% to 65% in a sample)
Less shops
Less low paid jobs

Increasingly warehouses are turning to automation so these low paid jobs will disappear too
Increasing automation and robotics = higher paid jobs
I am not sure if I want to support the Skelp and Magazin Rmanesc shops on any high street!
zworld24 m ago

I am not sure if I want to support the Skelp and Magazin Rmanesc shops on …I am not sure if I want to support the Skelp and Magazin Rmanesc shops on any high street!



We know you don't like them.
psychobitchfromhell20 h, 37 m ago

My son the train freak made me drive the seventy odd miles to redcar once …My son the train freak made me drive the seventy odd miles to redcar once because of the specific level crossing gate they have at the station. A day in my life I will never get back. We did also visit the lifeboat museum and have a walk along the beach which was pleasant enough but as a day out it would not reach my top ten. He however was in nirvana


I know you loved it really
Bargainhead12 h, 27 m ago

i Get what your saying and agree but my wallet doesn’t, if I can get cheap …i Get what your saying and agree but my wallet doesn’t, if I can get cheap online I’ll buy online. I will miss House Of Fraser (Binns) as I’ll have to walk up to psyche now to buy a new top.


well at least you r supporting local shop, and OMG the price of tops in there!!!
eslick11 h, 51 m ago

as someone who worked in a family retail business from the age of 12 to 25 …as someone who worked in a family retail business from the age of 12 to 25 that had been open for over 35 years, the problems today are not simply down to online sales, the problem has existed for the past 40 odd years. Supermarkets were the first major hit not them simply opening but the move to the what used to be called hyper stores, where they wanted to sell everything under one roof. One supermarket even put a blacksmith in to one of their stores in the late 80s early 90s when they opened in a country location. Their attitude was even back then, close down everything around them because people will come to us and thats what happened. Just look at how many butchers, bakers, green grocers (no candle stick makers) there were up to the early 80s. The biggest issue on killing the high street has been the rise in charity shops, they tend to pay market rent, never negotiated rents down and do not pay rates. When other companies then went for their rent reviews the independent reviewers never took the fact they werent paying rates into account just that they could pay the rents. We ended up closing our family business after our rent went up by £10K as did most of the shops around it, ended up with a massive supermarket being built in its place. For me personally career wise it was the best thing that happened as a youngster I thought long 16 hour days were the norm, not much money and certainly no holidays but my father thrived on it, at Christmas he even had to sleep in the shop as they were often targets for break ins with the added stock. Sadly within 10 years of the business closing we lost him, he was never the same after the shop closed. Yes the death of the high street has been affected by e commerce but just think of it this way, the supermarkets and the likes are now suffering the same as they did to the smaller family run businesses and no matter how much you think we can go back to that it will never happen.


Thats why a few years ago I started to go back to the small shops I do not eat much meat any more but wish I did as the Butcher in Thornaby is excellent, so friendly and gets you the cuts you want. last year I went in got what I wanted then realised I had lost my wallet, (found it on the drive at home). He insisted I took my shopping "pay me next time you are in" that is never going to happen in Tesco, and he is often cheaper even than ASDA
cmdr_elito7 h, 23 m ago

Less shopsLess low paid jobsIncreasingly warehouses are turning to …Less shopsLess low paid jobsIncreasingly warehouses are turning to automation so these low paid jobs will disappear tooIncreasing automation and robotics = higher paid jobs


OMG it will not it, will lead to more unemployment
cmdr_elito11 h, 19 m ago

Less shopsLess low paid jobsIncreasingly warehouses are turning to …Less shopsLess low paid jobsIncreasingly warehouses are turning to automation so these low paid jobs will disappear tooIncreasing automation and robotics = higher paid jobs



This is so far off the mark. The automation jobs are usually contracted out taking labour out of the area. You don’t graduate from warehouse picker to automation engineer in an afternoon with some on the job training
Dannyrobbo22 m ago

This is so far off the mark. The automation jobs are usually contracted …This is so far off the mark. The automation jobs are usually contracted out taking labour out of the area. You don’t graduate from warehouse picker to automation engineer in an afternoon with some on the job training


People need to think about the bigger picture and stop being obsessed with the now and in my back yard (NIMBY).

Look at history:

Automation in mills and workhouses = unemployment in short term
Automation and mostly closing of mines = short term unemployment
Closing of many ship building sites = short term unemployment
Closing of many docks = short term unemployment
Closing of many factories = short term unemployment
Closing of many shops = short term unemployment

There will always be jobs in the long term, those jobs will change over time as our economy changes and our way of life changes. This has happened in the past and will continue to happen in the future, we will need to adapt and it’s nothing to be scared of. The reality is people are going to need more education in future generations to be more skilled so they can adapt to these changes more quickly.
miles1364 h, 19 m ago

OMG it will not it, will lead to more unemployment


In the short term yes, longer term it will lead to more skilled jobs.
cmdr_elito1 h, 16 m ago

People need to think about the bigger picture and stop being obsessed with …People need to think about the bigger picture and stop being obsessed with the now and in my back yard (NIMBY).Look at history:Automation in mills and workhouses = unemployment in short termAutomation and mostly closing of mines = short term unemploymentClosing of many ship building sites = short term unemploymentClosing of many docks = short term unemployment Closing of many factories = short term unemploymentClosing of many shops = short term unemployment There will always be jobs in the long term, those jobs will change over time as our economy changes and our way of life changes. This has happened in the past and will continue to happen in the future, we will need to adapt and it’s nothing to be scared of. The reality is people are going to need more education in future generations to be more skilled so they can adapt to these changes more quickly.


Your idea on historical fact that people always found jobs, works in practice until which year after automation and AI, for those whose ability would max out at A Levels in science and maths subjects ?
You could be a NIMBY of the 2020s, have some clear vision of the future.

As an example, how many in the population could solve tons of equations this, so as to go onto university for STEM subjects?
33944139-wwq96.jpg
cmdr_elito2 h, 5 m ago

People need to think about the bigger picture and stop being obsessed with …People need to think about the bigger picture and stop being obsessed with the now and in my back yard (NIMBY).Look at history:Automation in mills and workhouses = unemployment in short termAutomation and mostly closing of mines = short term unemploymentClosing of many ship building sites = short term unemploymentClosing of many docks = short term unemployment Closing of many factories = short term unemploymentClosing of many shops = short term unemployment There will always be jobs in the long term, those jobs will change over time as our economy changes and our way of life changes. This has happened in the past and will continue to happen in the future, we will need to adapt and it’s nothing to be scared of. The reality is people are going to need more education in future generations to be more skilled so they can adapt to these changes more quickly.



If you really think that once automation hits a level where even the normal day to day jobs shelf stacking, call Center etc are replaced there will be enough skilled jobs for all these unskilled workers then you are seriously that far removed from reality you don’t Really know what you’re talking about
Dannyrobbo35 m ago

If you really think that once automation hits a level where even the …If you really think that once automation hits a level where even the normal day to day jobs shelf stacking, call Center etc are replaced there will be enough skilled jobs for all these unskilled workers then you are seriously that far removed from reality you don’t Really know what you’re talking about


I’m not removed from reality, there will be more jobs in coding, component design, servicing etc to replace these jobs and as yet unknown new areas of technology. As coding gets more complex so the requirement for more coders and skills. People shouldn’t be afraid of the future.
splender1 h, 58 m ago

Your idea on historical fact that people always found jobs, works in …Your idea on historical fact that people always found jobs, works in practice until which year after automation and AI, for those whose ability would max out at A Levels in science and maths subjects ?You could be a NIMBY of the 2020s, have some clear vision of the future.As an example, how many in the population could solve tons of equations this, so as to go onto university for STEM subjects?[Image]


That’s my point short term unemployment, some will retrain, some will retire and some in remaining low paid service jobs will train and move into skilled work vacating jobs for remaining unskilled workers. This has happened for a very long time and will continue to happen well into the future. Anyone who thinks different is severely out of touch with reality.
cmdr_elito52 m ago

I’m not removed from reality, there will be more jobs in coding, component …I’m not removed from reality, there will be more jobs in coding, component design, servicing etc to replace these jobs and as yet unknown new areas of technology. As coding gets more complex so the requirement for more coders and skills. People shouldn’t be afraid of the future.



More jobs but not to the tune of what is being lost, automation means less need for human labour. Not everybody is suitable or able to code and even less could design components. Lots of these people would be unable to learn this skill, they are not young enough to retrain.

an example, one call Center is replaced by an AI system. 300 people replaced, you think it’s going to take 300 people to maintain this system? It’ll be one guy covering an area on call in a team of 20-30 people that cover the system for the country.

whichever way you look at it automation at the level it will be at in 10 years will mean less jobs in our economy
cmdr_elito1 h, 26 m ago

That’s my point short term unemployment, some will retrain, some will r …That’s my point short term unemployment, some will retrain, some will retire and some in remaining low paid service jobs will train and move into skilled work vacating jobs for remaining unskilled workers. This has happened for a very long time and will continue to happen well into the future. Anyone who thinks different is severely out of touch with reality.



Your point on "short-term" is rhectoric in tautology.

You wrote:

"Look at history:

Automation in mills and workhouses = unemployment in short term
Automation and mostly closing of mines = short term unemployment
Closing of many ship building sites = short term unemployment
Closing of many docks = short term unemployment
Closing of many factories = short term unemployment
Closing of many shops = short term unemployment

There will always be jobs in the long term..."


I have highlighted your "short-term", in effect, you point is, in the long run, "short-term is short-term", or "short term is not long term". Everybody knows this.

I would not be able to make use of similar phrases like, "Brexit is Brexit", "An egg is egg shaped", etc.

Critically, the OP's post is "Should we buy less online to support our local shops and economy ?"

You selected short term unemployment only, and discarded long term (structural), employment, which is a tremendous challenge in the EU to resolve, that's where the discussion is to help people, rhectoric does nothing.
Edited by: "splender" 9th Jun
Dannyrobbo3 h, 31 m ago

More jobs but not to the tune of what is being lost, automation means less …More jobs but not to the tune of what is being lost, automation means less need for human labour. Not everybody is suitable or able to code and even less could design components. Lots of these people would be unable to learn this skill, they are not young enough to retrain.an example, one call Center is replaced by an AI system. 300 people replaced, you think it’s going to take 300 people to maintain this system? It’ll be one guy covering an area on call in a team of 20-30 people that cover the system for the country.whichever way you look at it automation at the level it will be at in 10 years will mean less jobs in our economy


People can learn anything, if they want to. I’ve known people that couldn’t read or write properly but managed to learn and now run their own businesses earning good money.

Call centre jobs will go and are already doing so, AI is already being built into apps.

In future generations people will need to be prepared to retrain to do new things and there will come a whole new set of problems as we move our frontier to space, mining asteroids, flying to space, building space stations and hopefully colonisation!
cmdr_elito17 m ago

People can learn anything, if they want to. I’ve known people that c …People can learn anything, if they want to. I’ve known people that couldn’t read or write properly but managed to learn and now run their own businesses earning good money.Call centre jobs will go and are already doing so, AI is already being built into apps.In future generations people will need to be prepared to retrain to do new things and there will come a whole new set of problems as we move our frontier to space, mining asteroids, flying to space, building space stations and hopefully colonisation!



Im not really talking about a generational thing, those in school now will have to adapt, even so there are less opportunities for people not academically inclined. I’m talking about those 30-50 year olds who have been in the same simple job for 30 years. You are very misinformed if you think they are going to be coding robots and writing algorithms.

Not everybody is capable of this, and you are pretty naive and sheltered if you think automation will create more jobs that it destroys. It’s my line of work and I have seen first hand how these advances have affected the factory workforce.
cmdr_elito19 h, 21 m ago

Less shopsLess low paid jobsIncreasingly warehouses are turning to …Less shopsLess low paid jobsIncreasingly warehouses are turning to automation so these low paid jobs will disappear tooIncreasing automation and robotics = higher paid jobs


Are you going to fund the re-training of the existing low-skilled, labour-intensive, & low-paid workforce that will maintain the automated/robotic systems?

What will happen to individuals that cannot, or will not, be able to learn new skills?
fanpages43 m ago

Are you going to fund the re-training of the existing low-skilled, …Are you going to fund the re-training of the existing low-skilled, labour-intensive, & low-paid workforce that will maintain the automated/robotic systems?What will happen to individuals that cannot, or will not, be able to learn new skills?


We will end up supporting them as we do currently (benefits), why would it be any different to now?
cmdr_elito20 h, 18 m ago

Less shopsLess low paid jobsIncreasingly warehouses are turning to …Less shopsLess low paid jobsIncreasingly warehouses are turning to automation so these low paid jobs will disappear tooIncreasing automation and robotics = higher paid jobs



fanpages56 m ago

Are you going to fund the re-training of the existing low-skilled, …Are you going to fund the re-training of the existing low-skilled, labour-intensive, & low-paid workforce that will maintain the automated/robotic systems?What will happen to individuals that cannot, or will not, be able to learn new skills?



cmdr_elito13 m ago

We will end up supporting them as we do currently (benefits), why would it …We will end up supporting them as we do currently (benefits), why would it be any different to now?



...because you said "...Increasing automation and robotics = higher paid jobs".

I'll assume you didn't think about how that was going to be achieved.
fanpages3 h, 28 m ago

...because you said "...Increasing automation and robotics = higher paid …...because you said "...Increasing automation and robotics = higher paid jobs".I'll assume you didn't think about how that was going to be achieved.



I think deep down he knows the answer, I mean you can’t genuinely think AI and automation is going to create more jobs than it will eliminate
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