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Sleep apnea

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Posted 10th Dec 2019
Someone I know is having a hard time when sleeping. They have sleep apnea and keep waking up and struggling to breathe. They even look as if they’re choking sometimes. Sleepless nights result in hard days at work.
Anybody having similar problems? Any advice?
Thanks
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Go to a doctor. There's loads of 'snake oil' treatments, but if they're having trouble breathing.....?
As above doctors don’t risk it, you can die with sleep apnea
You have come to the right place, as this is the best place for medical advice especially with breathing problems...

Type sleep apnea into eBay loads of good treatments lol...they all work perfect..
Doctors. They’ll send them to a sleep clinic and probably give them equipment to use during the night. My dad has this. It’s not nice at all.
Sleep clinic which doctor will refer too. They'll monitor wake times and breathing and give equipment to help if needed. Not sure excatly what it is but my aunty has to wear some sort of head/face thing as they recorded her stopping breathing for significant times through the night. Could be serious.
The best advice we can give you is to you to go and see your doctor. They will be able to talk to you and assess the situation and if necessary refer you for the relevant tests.
Haircut_10010/12/2019 07:01

The best advice we can give you is to you to go and see your doctor. They …The best advice we can give you is to you to go and see your doctor. They will be able to talk to you and assess the situation and if necessary refer you for the relevant tests.


This ^^^

Get them to go and see their GP and get a proper referral. If they have seen the GP and Sleep Clinic and are still having issues go back and say the treatment isn’t working properly, so they can try something else.

A quick google
helpguide.org/art…htm

Self-help treatments

whilea diagnosis of sleep apnea can be scary, it is a treatable condition. In fact, there are many steps you can take on your own to help, particularly for mild to moderate sleep apnea. Home remedies and lifestyle modifications can go a long way in reducing sleep apnea symptoms. However, they should not replace medical evaluation and treatment.

Lifestyle changes to reduce sleep apnea symptomsLose weight. People who are overweight have extra tissue in the back of their throat, which can fall down over the airway and block the flow of air into the lungs while they sleep. Even a small amount of weight loss can open up your throat and improve sleep apnea symptoms.

Quit smoking. Smoking contributes to sleep apnea by increasing inflammation and fluid retention in your throat and upper airway.

Avoid alcohol, sleeping pills, and sedatives, especially before bedtime, because they relax the muscles in the throat and interfere with breathing.

Exercise regularly. As well as helping you lose weight, regular exercise can have a major effect on the duration and quality of sleep. Aerobic and resistance training can help reduce sleep apnea symptoms, while yoga is also good for strengthening the muscles in your airways and improving breathing.

Avoid caffeine and heavy meals within two hours of going to bed.

Maintain regular sleep hours. Sticking to a steady sleep schedule will help you relax and sleep better. Sleep apnea episodes decrease when you get plenty of sleep.

Bedtime tips for preventing sleep apneaSleep on your side. Avoid sleeping on your back which makes it more likely for your tongue and soft tissues to obstruct your airway. Some people only experience sleep apnea when sleeping on their back.

The tennis ball trick. To keep yourself from rolling onto your back while you sleep, sew a tennis ball into a pocket on the back of your pajama top. Or wedge a pillow stuffed with tennis balls behind your back.

Prop your head up. Elevate the head of your bed by four to six inches, or elevate your body from the waist up by using a foam wedge or special cervical pillow.

Open your nasal passages at night by using a nasal dilator, saline spray, breathing strips, or a nasal irrigation system (neti pot).

Tighten the muscles that keep the mouth closed. Try chewing gum or holding a pen between your teeth for about 10 minutes before bedtime, or until your jaw starts to ache.
I was undiagnosed for around 8 years (from when I felt bad after sleeping etc.) and it was until my now wife moved in with me, I wasnt even aware.

When I used to go to sleep, I would be a heavy snorer and then, i would shake. yeah shake and then i would settle (as i was finally getting air). What was happening that my airways was closing up and no oxygen was getting to my brian and i was basically choking in my sleep. What my brain would do is wake me up so that I could then breath and of course, not getting my full sleep.

According to the sleep specialist, I was not having deep sleep for all that time and she was very suprised it wasnt worse (basically choking to death). On average I would stop breathing 55 time hour. Not kidding, it was insane!

I know a buddy whos mate died from not taking it seriously and actually died in his sleep from choking to death, Its crazy crazy series and..

GET TO A DOCTOR NOW!

If they are half arsed about it (mine was) DEMEND to see a sleep specialist. Took a year process but so glad I got it sort as the first time I wore my mask and had a deep sleep for the first time in years, oh wowzers it was amazing!

So some tips to helps with diagnoses:

* Do you fall asleep at the wheel of the car or try to doze, even at a short distance? Thats a massive sign as when you trying to concentrate and as your brian hasnt had porper rest, it will basically try to go to sleep.

* Does this happen when you read or watch tv or, in my case, play computer games?

* Also record yourself too sleeping and you will hear norsing and, in my case, choking.

IVe now been treated for the last 5 years and having proper sleep is amazing.

Any other adivse (got a few more bits) I can help but GET TO THAT DOCTOR!!!
Avoiding alcohol worked for me.
Yes, defo see a doctor. My grandmother died as a complication of sleep apnea.
After falling sleep standing up in the kitchen (and smashing glass oven door)doc sent me to hospital for tests.I now have a ventilation machine for use at night.I have to wear a full face mask,if I fail to take a breath the machine takes one for me.I have been using for over8 years
pooool10/12/2019 08:36

Avoiding alcohol worked for me.


You weren’t drinking enough, just drink enough to pass out always works for me...
Lie down on your back and watch what happens to your stomach when you breathe in. It rises. That is because your diaphragm contracts to increase the volume of your chest. That reduces the pressure in your thorax and atmospheric pressure pushes air into your lungs. If you are overweight your diaphragm has to work harder pushing mass out of the way to allow you to breathe. Sleeping in a warm, poorly ventilated room exacerbates that effect by reducing the amount of oxygen available in each breath.
I had a few episodes of sleep apnea and made a point of losing weight. I have had no episodes since dropping out of the 'obese' range.
Edited by: "dogpatch" 10th Dec 2019
They must see their GP, will be assessed and will probably get a CPAP to wear at night, they should also inform DVLA if they have a medical condition that affects their driving gov.uk/obs…ing
It's largely down to being fat/heavy. Diet and excercise, or forever wear a mask that forces oxygen into your lungs as you sleep.
i doubt if this someone has not already been to see their doctor as you will be gong down to see your gp pretty pronto if you suffocate every time you fall asleep! i am guessing the OP is asking if anyone suffers from the condition and can give practical advice as to how they dealt with it.

here is the condition on the NHS site. sounds quite a serious condition so i would be very frightened if i suffered from this condition as the feeling of not being able to breathe must cause immense distress, especially when you first wake up and you are not yet fully aware of what is happening.

nhs.uk/con…ea/
old_mikefield10/12/2019 21:27

Comment deleted


if you correct one person you should correct everyone who spelt it the same otherwise it’s discrimination...look at the title of the thread.... I could take his as a personal attack,. But I understand there are special people out there, that’s being polite otherwise comments get deleted...
Bargainhead11/12/2019 05:30

if you correct one person you should correct everyone who spelt it the …if you correct one person you should correct everyone who spelt it the same otherwise it’s discrimination...look at the title of the thread.... I could take his as a personal attack,. But I understand there are special people out there, that’s being polite otherwise comments get deleted...


Awww. That's lovely. I think that you're special too.
old_mikefield11/12/2019 07:15

Awww. That's lovely. I think that you're special too.


I aim to please the spelling police...
You need to see a doctor.

In the meantime, some things that can help for some people:

- If you're overweight, lose weight
- Avoid alcohol
- Sleep propped up/slightly upright (e.g. 30 degrees)
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