Small molecule could make a big difference for arthritis patients

16
Found 20th Feb
Saw this in a few articles and if like me you've got knees that have been carbon dated from Jurassic period this might be something we should be looking out for!


Will there come a time when a patient with arthritis can forgo joint
replacement surgery in favor of a shot? Keck School of Medicine of USC
scientist Denis Evseenko, MD, PhD, has reason to be optimistic.


In a new publication in the Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases,
Evseenko’s team describes the promise of a new molecule aptly named
“Regulator of Cartilage Growth and Differentiation,” or RCGD 423 for
short.


As its name implies, RCGD 423 enhances regeneration while curbing
inflammation. When RCGD 423 was applied to joint cartilage cells in the
laboratory, the cells proliferated more and died less, and when injected
into the knees of rats with damaged cartilage, the animals could more
effectively heal their injuries.


RCGD 423 exerts its effects by communicating with a specific molecule
in the body. This molecule, called the glycoprotein 130 (Gp130)
receptor, receives two very different types of signals: those that
promote cartilage development in the embryo, and those that trigger
chronic inflammation in the adult. RCGD 423 amplifies the Gp130
receptor’s ability to receive the developmental signals that can
stimulate cartilage regeneration, while blocking the inflammatory
signals that can lead to cartilage degeneration over the long term.


Given these auspicious early results, the team is already laying the
groundwork for a clinical trial to test RCGD 423 or a similar molecule
as a treatment for osteoarthritis or juvenile arthritis.


“The goal is to make an injectable therapy for an early to moderate
level of arthritis,” says Evseenko, associate professor of orthopaedic
surgery. “It’s not going to cure arthritis, but it will delay the
progression of arthritis to the damaging stages when patients need joint
replacements, which account for a million surgeries a year in the U.S.”


Evseenko sees RCGD 423 as a prototype for a new class of
anti-inflammatory drugs with a very broad range of indications. His lab
has already developed several structural analogs of RCGD 423 with
varying biological effects and potency. In a previous study published in
Nature Cell Biology,
RCGD 423 was shown to activate stem cells to make hair grow. The lab is
partnering with scientists at USC and beyond to explore the broader
potential of these molecules to treat rheumatoid arthritis, jaw
arthritis, lupus, neurological and heart diseases and baldness, as well
as to maintain pluripotent stem cells in the laboratory.


Taken from keck.usc.edu/sma…ts/
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16 Comments
Good news, lab results on rats identify a novel strategy for articular cartilage remediation (prevention and repair) via small molecule-mediated modulation of glycoprotein 130 signalling.
splender16 m ago

Good news, lab results on rats identify a novel strategy for articular …Good news, lab results on rats identify a novel strategy for articular cartilage remediation (prevention and repair) via small molecule-mediated modulation of glycoprotein 130 signalling.


I couldn't have said it better myself - in fact I still can't say it
It is impressive how far medicine continues to advance.
Though do bear in mind, although sounding very promising, and there appears a lot of work being done here, it's a long process before something is ready that can be used with confidence in specific amounts. We may be light years away from it being in that category though let's hope not. Though let's not forget, one of the hallmarks of science is not only producing results and having those results reviewed by peers and published, but that those results can be reproduced (under controlled conditions) by other scientists independently. This is a very long process and can also take a very long time. It could be years before this is prescribed for any treatment of arthritis.

I hope I am wrong though.
Edited by: "LemonHead" 20th Feb
Original Poster
LemonHead11 m ago

Though do bear in mind, although sounding very promising, and there …Though do bear in mind, although sounding very promising, and there appears a lot of work being done here, it's a long process before something is ready that can be used with confidence in specific amounts. We may be light years away from it being in that category though let's hope not. Though let's not forget, one of the hallmarks of science is not only producing results and having those results reviewed by peers and published, but that those results can be reproduced (under controlled conditions) by other scientists independently. This is a very long process and can also take a very long time. It could be years before this is prescribed for any treatment of arthritis.I hope I am wrong though.



Haven't read that much about it but the articles from mainstream press made out it was a very short time horizon until real world application, but the regulation and red tape is there for a reason. All the initial testing signs do seem very promising however.

As you said though, its different that one scientific body can produce results but an entirely different one when its repeatable and accepted.

How long do things like this usually take to come into proper use, is it a few years or a few decades?
Edited by: "BIGUSHEADUS" 20th Feb
BIGUSHEADUS10 m ago

Haven't read that much about it but the articles from mainstream press …Haven't read that much about it but the articles from mainstream press made out it was a very short time horizon until real world application, but the regulation and red tape is there for a reason. All the initial testing signs do seem very promising however.As you said though, its different that one scientific body can produce results but an entirely different one when its repeatable and accepted.How long do things like this usually take to come into proper use, is it a few years or a few decades?



It varies, but you wouldn't be far out with a decade.
Original Poster
CoeK16 m ago

It varies, but you wouldn't be far out with a decade.



Good golly, I don't think my joints can wait that long
BIGUSHEADUS11 m ago

Good golly, I don't think my joints can wait that long



You can take part in medical studies. I'm sure there are a number of arthritis studies arthritisresearchuk.org/res…spx

Possibly something you could do?
BIGUSHEADUS1 h, 5 m ago

Haven't read that much about it but the articles from mainstream press …Haven't read that much about it but the articles from mainstream press made out it was a very short time horizon until real world application, but the regulation and red tape is there for a reason. All the initial testing signs do seem very promising however.As you said though, its different that one scientific body can produce results but an entirely different one when its repeatable and accepted.How long do things like this usually take to come into proper use, is it a few years or a few decades?


On your last point it depends really though CoeK could be right. Either way it sounds very promising.

I also found this from the Daily Mirror for those of us who are not scientists. I'm also wondering whether to take this article with a pinch of salt as these newspaper articles can be very misleading and sometimes contradict the facts. Even though it says experiments on rats and human cells were so successful human trials are now being planned this would still have to go through the same process as I've mentioned above. The article also goes on to say it is not yet clear whether this potential therapy could be useful in humans. Nevertheless, it does sound promising.

mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news/miracle-jab-could-provide-pain-12008787
Edited by: "LemonHead" 20th Feb
CoeK38 m ago

You can take part in medical studies. I'm sure there are a number of …You can take part in medical studies. I'm sure there are a number of arthritis studies http://www.arthritisresearchuk.org/research/our-current-research/our-current-clinical-trials.aspxPossibly something you could do?


What the OP also needs to find out is wether this treatment is suitable for thier current condition. Would it be effective on advanced arthritis?
Edited by: "LemonHead" 20th Feb
LemonHead59 s ago

What the OP also needs to find out is wether this treatment is suitable …What the OP also needs to find out is wether this treatment is suitable for thier current condition. Would it be effective on advanced arthritis?



It appears to be used to slow down rather than reverse arthritis so i doubt it.
CoeK3 m ago

It appears to be used to slow down rather than reverse arthritis so i …It appears to be used to slow down rather than reverse arthritis so i doubt it.


Yes, my point exactly.
LemonHead12 m ago

Yes, my point exactly.



I was more suggesting he could take part in other studies, that are currently ongoing. Rather than wait for this to get to the human studies point.
Original Poster
CoeK1 h, 12 m ago

I was more suggesting he could take part in other studies, that are …I was more suggesting he could take part in other studies, that are currently ongoing. Rather than wait for this to get to the human studies point.



I've dislocated my knee frequently through various sports over the years and been told about a week ago that its moderate bordering on advanced; I'm mid 20s so I'm just trying to get ahead of it even though its degenerative and arthritis begins for everyone at or around the age of 21. I still need to read up about it but I was really happy when I saw this.

I'll definitely have a look at the clinical trials and discuss them with my physio, thanks CoeK and LemonHead.
Edited by: "BIGUSHEADUS" 20th Feb
I thought Borax was used to counter arthritis
mastablasta19 h, 43 m ago

I thought Borax was used to counter arthritis


Borax, also known as sodium borate, sodium tetraborate, or disodium tetraborate, is an important boron compound, a mineral, and a salt of boric acid.

en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Borax

According to Deepti Pradhan, who tries to help help demystify science for the non-scientist:

m.huffpost.com/us/author/deepti-pradhan-126

The drug Velcade (commonly called bortezomib) was developed to treat multiple myeloma, a cancer that forms in a type of white blood cell called a plasma cell. However, after animal studies it was found to also reduce inflammation caused by arthritis, and it is now prescribed to some patients with arthritis.

It is possible that some of the anti-inflammatory effect of bortezomib is a consequence of the boron (hence “bor”-tezomib) that is an integral element of the drug.


This was the only reliable and up-to-date thing I could find.

m.huffpost.com/us/entry/us_59fdd68be4b05e3e1f0a017b
Edited by: "LemonHead" 21st Feb
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