Sonoff T1 Touch installation

12
Found 18th Mar
For those that don’t know, the Sonoff is a wall light switch that also connects to WiFi and an RF switch too.

So unlike Philips Hue or Yeelight etc, you’re not limited by the type of bulb nor do you have to worry about keeping the regular light switch on the wall turned on.

I’ve had this Sonoff T1 for some tine but can never get it to work correctly so haven’t installed it.

I can get it to power the switch on via live and neutral and can even connect via my iPhone in the app and change the on/off status.

What doesn’t work is the actual switching on/off lights, from wall or app.

The lights I’ve tried are both LED and halogen (albeit both dimmers).

What could be the problem?
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12 Comments
I had a problem with mine and realised I orfered the EU one when there is a specific UK one,?
I have one, works OK.

Have you checked the switch using a multimeter, checking you get an outlet voltage when the status is ON? It may be that the relay is just not switching on when being asked to. Do you hear the relay clicking shen you change state? Is it a single gang - if not try another relay?

A photo of the switch as it is wired may be useful.
Whats the wiring like? At the light fitting and at the switch.

Typically a wall switch doesn't have a live and neutral - it just has the live feed which is switched by the switch (no, really ).

The lighting ring usually runs around the light fittings and each fitting has a spur to the switch.
Creatishh18th Mar

I had a problem with mine and realised I orfered the EU one when there is …I had a problem with mine and realised I orfered the EU one when there is a specific UK one,?


I’m quite sure mine is UK as that’s what I specifically ordered. Not sure how else to check, will have a look at unit and box again tonight
Van197318th Mar

I have one, works OK.Have you checked the switch using a multimeter, …I have one, works OK.Have you checked the switch using a multimeter, checking you get an outlet voltage when the status is ON? It may be that the relay is just not switching on when being asked to. Do you hear the relay clicking shen you change state? Is it a single gang - if not try another relay?A photo of the switch as it is wired may be useful.


Yes definitely hear the relay clocking when I switch from touch/app. Will get outlet tested by somebody. I’ve always considered investing in a multi meter from likes of Aldi/Lidl but I’d be useless with it.
mas991 h, 38 m ago

Whats the wiring like? At the light fitting and at the switch.Typically …Whats the wiring like? At the light fitting and at the switch.Typically a wall switch doesn't have a live and neutral - it just has the live feed which is switched by the switch (no, really ).The lighting ring usually runs around the light fittings and each fitting has a spur to the switch.


I’ll take a photo but Inknow there’s a blue wire with must be neutral. The switch powers up and connect via WiFi with live into common and blue neautral into N.

I’ll be honest I’ve never opened the light fitting. Anything I should look for there?
loofer11 m ago

I’ll take a photo but Inknow there’s a blue wire with must be neutral. The …I’ll take a photo but Inknow there’s a blue wire with must be neutral. The switch powers up and connect via WiFi with live into common and blue neautral into N.I’ll be honest I’ve never opened the light fitting. Anything I should look for there?


Let's see a photo and it may become clear.

If at the switch there is just one cable with two wires from it then there will be no neutral. What mas99 has called a "spur" is a single cable from the ceiling rose to the light switch. This is normally a permanent live on one of the wires and a "switched" live on the other wire - so the light switches interupts the live supply to the bulb. Electricians generally use just standard cable (brown/blue wires or red/black in older cables) for this - they are meant to put brown/red sleeving around the blue cable to signify that it is being used as a live but often (mostly) they don't - so a blue cable inside a light switch is not likely to be a neutral.

I agree - don't use a multimeter unless you are 100% sure of what you are doing.
Van197318th Mar

Let's see a photo and it may become clear. If at the switch there is just …Let's see a photo and it may become clear. If at the switch there is just one cable with two wires from it then there will be no neutral. What mas99 has called a "spur" is a single cable from the ceiling rose to the light switch. This is normally a permanent live on one of the wires and a "switched" live on the other wire - so the light switches interupts the live supply to the bulb. Electricians generally use just standard cable (brown/blue wires or red/black in older cables) for this - they are meant to put brown/red sleeving around the blue cable to signify that it is being used as a live but often (mostly) they don't - so a blue cable inside a light switch is not likely to be a neutral.I agree - don't use a multimeter unless you are 100% sure of what you are doing.

33473440-PCK5M.jpg
Light rose fitting

33473440-8C6Hb.jpg
33473440-AnJdl.jpg
So the box confirms it’s UK version.
Not sure why the switching screw is L2 rather than L1 but I imagine it’s all connected correctly on circuit board, or could it be a bad one?

33473440-C3ER2.jpg
Ok this is where it gets very complicated. Not sure why there’s all these cables, I’ve just inherited it.
The original wall switch is just a single gang push/turn dimmer switch.
The connections are common/live, L2 and L1
There are 2 sheaths of cable coming into pattress box.
3 core cable with 2 red wires and 1 earth, each red wire is going into either L1 or L2 jointly with ones mention below.
4 core cable with 1 red (going into live), 1 yellow (going into L2), 1 blue, presumably neutral (going into L1) and finally the earth wire.
Both earths are connected to same earth terminal.

So, on the Sonoff I connect the blue to N, red live to L in and I’ve tried every permutation of the other wires in the L out.
To explain the Sonoff it simply needs a live and neutral (Lin and Nin) which powers the switch. When set to ON the relay will pass the live from Lin through to L2. (L1, L2 and L3 just cater for up to the 3 gang switch - for a 1 gang switch which is what yours appears to be it looks like they just use L2).

Looking at the wiring of your existing switch is this for a 2 way light - a light fitting that has 2 switches that will operate it like a landing light?
Van197324 m ago

To explain the Sonoff it simply needs a live and neutral (Lin and Nin) …To explain the Sonoff it simply needs a live and neutral (Lin and Nin) which powers the switch. When set to ON the relay will pass the live from Lin through to L2. (L1, L2 and L3 just cater for up to the 3 gang switch - for a 1 gang switch which is what yours appears to be it looks like they just use L2). Looking at the wiring of your existing switch is this for a 2 way light - a light fitting that has 2 switches that will operate it like a landing light?


It may have been a 2 way switch at some point in time but we’ve inherited it as just one switch, but I’m not sure why it would have an L1 and L2, as though it could control 2 outputs with a single button?
As far I know, it only controls one set of lights
33473725-ZXtmZ.jpg
The description of how the dimmer switch is wired suggests it is part of a two way (or three way circuit). Impossible to tell without a physical inspection of your circuit.

What I suggest is that there is no neutral in your dimmer switch - the blue cable looks like it is used as a switched live.
Van197315 h, 39 m ago

The description of how the dimmer switch is wired suggests it is part of a …The description of how the dimmer switch is wired suggests it is part of a two way (or three way circuit). Impossible to tell without a physical inspection of your circuit. What I suggest is that there is no neutral in your dimmer switch - the blue cable looks like it is used as a switched live.


Blimey, would’ve helped if they just terminated the wires that weren’t needed.

I’ve opened other light switches around the house and none of them have the blue wire. The house was built in early 80s, not sure if it’s had require since.
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