Stunning performance academically

17
Edited by:"davewave"Found 13th Sep 2017
One of Britain's youngest graduates earns a first class maths degree aged just 13 after studying in his free time

  • Wang Pok Lo did an Open University course and is now studying for Master's
  • He was doing sums aged two and passed Advanced Higher Maths exams at 11
  • Pok will take on part-time MSc in statistic with medical applications at Sheffield
  • Pupil said he was delighted with result but admits it is getting far more difficult


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17 Comments

Interesting!

Believe it or not, Dave, I've met lots of Chinese/Korean kids who all appear to be brilliant at mathematics.

One of my closest friends is a Korean Mathematics professor; he was astounded when he saw the work my son (12 at the time) was doing in his class. He told me he expected his Korean pupils to have passed all that before age 7 (he runs his own school). He would expect a 12 years old to be involved in higher mathematics.
I overheard him, his colleague and his Chinese doctor friend (her son aged 12 had already passed his highers) talking about their surprise at British educational standards in comparison to theirs (my friends pupils spend 12 - 16 hours per day in school).
Edited by: "tryn2help" 13th Sep 2017

tryn2help5 h, 30 m ago

Believe it or not, Dave, I've met lots of Chinese/Korean kids who all …Believe it or not, Dave, I've met lots of Chinese/Korean kids who all appear to be brilliant at mathematics.One of my closest friends is a Korean Mathematics professor; he was astounded when he saw the work my son (12 at the time) was doing in his class. He told me he expected his Korean pupils to have passed all that before age 7 (he runs his own school). He would expect a 12 years old to be involved in higher mathematics.I overheard him, his colleague and his Chinese doctor friend (her son aged 12 had already passed his highers) talking about their surprise at British educational standards in comparison to theirs (my friends pupils spend 12 - 16 hours per day in school).



Yet another example of dumbing down. Standards have been falling for years, hence the high pass rates, not just at school level but at degree level as well.
The 12/7 comparison is probably about right. Some of the basic maths I learned at primary school just doesn't seem to be taught until secondary now, so if you've lost 5 years, there's no way you're going to get it back by the time you leave school.

tryn2help5 h, 41 m ago

Believe it or not, Dave, I've met lots of Chinese/Korean kids who all …Believe it or not, Dave, I've met lots of Chinese/Korean kids who all appear to be brilliant at mathematics.One of my closest friends is a Korean Mathematics professor; he was astounded when he saw the work my son (12 at the time) was doing in his class. He told me he expected his Korean pupils to have passed all that before age 7 (he runs his own school). He would expect a 12 years old to be involved in higher mathematics.I overheard him, his colleague and his Chinese doctor friend (her son aged 12 had already passed his highers) talking about their surprise at British educational standards in comparison to theirs (my friends pupils spend 12 - 16 hours per day in school).


Sixteen hours a day huh?
How long do they sleep?

Destard36 m ago

Sixteen hours a day huh?How long do they sleep?


Do the math and figure it out!

A follow the Daily Mail on twitter link, really? Do I need to report this for self promotion?

Destard6 h, 0 m ago

Sixteen hours a day huh?How long do they sleep?


Does seem a little excessive.

But then again I like maths so I probably wouldn't mind.

Original Poster

CoeK2 h, 7 m ago

Does seem a little excessive.But then again I like maths so I probably …Does seem a little excessive.But then again I like maths so I probably wouldn't mind.


whats your favourite number?

davewave10 m ago

whats your favourite number?



73

Destard11 h, 43 m ago

Sixteen hours a day huh?How long do they sleep?



Not a great deal actually, that was one of the first things I asked.

The kids lifes appear to be nothing but education and sleep, and it's driven by their parents - in fact, the whole family including grandparents, aunts/uncles, in-laws the lot.

As you would expect under such a regime the biggest cause of death among South Korean children is suicide - and it's much higher than anywhere in the western world.

tryn2help25 m ago

Not a great deal actually, that was one of the first things I asked.The …Not a great deal actually, that was one of the first things I asked.The kids lifes appear to be nothing but education and sleep, and it's driven by their parents - in fact, the whole family including grandparents, aunts/uncles, in-laws the lot.As you would expect under such a regime the biggest cause of death among South Korean children is suicide - and it's much higher than anywhere in the western world.



As usual the best way is somewhere in the middle.

CoeK6 h, 36 m ago

Does seem a little excessive.But then again I like maths so I probably …Does seem a little excessive.But then again I like maths so I probably wouldn't mind.



Private school, couldn't say what State schools are like - possibly not so intense.
Parents pay a lot of money for their kids to get the best available education.

Obviously not just maths studied, CoeK, every other subject too - especially English language (there is a growing preference for British English over the dominant American English, thus British English teachers are in high demand; might be a bit of encouraging info for those who may be considering teaching English abroad).

Just goes to show how much influence parents can have on their children.


In Korea they are driven in this direction, China, Japan and India are much the same - it's all about pushing the kids relentlessly.



Makes me wonder if parents dressing their kids in opposite-sex clothing would have the same effects. i.e. does the kid really want it, or is the kid just trying to please the parents?


32003891-VSRuz.jpg
Edited by: "tryn2help" 16th Sep 2017

tryn2help1 h, 19 m ago

Just goes to show how much influence parents can have on their children.In …Just goes to show how much influence parents can have on their children.In Korea they are driven in this direction, China, Japan and India are much the same - it's all about pushing the kids relentlessly.Makes me wonder if parents dressing their kids in opposite-sex clothing would have the same effects. i.e. does the kid really want it, or is the kid just trying to please the parents?[Image]


Same point could be made about parents forcing their children to follow silly religions which end up giving them guilt complexes or mistakenly thinking they're better than other people and are in any position to judge?

Cr0m9 m ago

Same point could be made about parents forcing their children to follow …Same point could be made about parents forcing their children to follow silly religions which end up giving them guilt complexes or mistakenly thinking they're better than other people and are in any position to judge?


32004557-vrDWP.jpg

Cr0m3 h, 49 m ago

Same point could be made about parents forcing their children to follow …Same point could be made about parents forcing their children to follow silly religions which end up giving them guilt complexes or mistakenly thinking they're better than other people and are in any position to judge?



Same point could be made about ANY form of indoctrination - and their are lots, not just religious, but also unproven scientific beliefs, any number of philosophical beliefs or political ideologies.

If kids get it rammed down their throats from birth they're almost certain to go with it.


I suppose the aggressive secularism we're witnessing today is simply copying the same 'ram it down the throats of the young' technique that's been used by all other dictatorial organisations throughout history.


Personally, I think it's quite sad to see how easily influenced people are - especially children - and it's quite sad to see so many people prepared to take advantage of that for their own ends.

It is indeed a sad world we live in.
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