Super cheap Windows 10 keys, Are they Legit/safe?

19
Found 2nd Jul 2017
I have seen these a few times, but now I'm actually considering getting one - are they too good to be true? I'm always erring on the side of caution when things are this cheap but I am uncertain here.

a couple of examples of the retailers;

ebay.co.uk/itm…RuG

amazon.co.uk/Win…+10


What are people's opinions/thoughts/experiences on this?

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19 Comments
The first link looks legit, as it says you actually receive the broken motherboard, so you actually own the original, not working hardware.
worf20120 m ago

The first link looks legit, as it says you actually receive the broken …The first link looks legit, as it says you actually receive the broken motherboard, so you actually own the original, not working hardware.


Well that's always useful, can never have too many broken mobos, I do like the proof thing though
phil36

...What are people's opinions/thoughts/experiences on this?


Assuming the user doesn't want to change the desktop background to some silly image or otherwise personify the installation, no licence key / code is required to use W10 indefinitely without restriction.
AndyRoyd

Assuming the user doesn't want to change the desktop background to some … Assuming the user doesn't want to change the desktop background to some silly image or otherwise personify the installation, no licence key / code is required to use W10 indefinitely without restriction.


I change my background a couple times a week. Why wouldn't you spend less than £2 for a legit Win10 key?
RiverDragon8

I change my background a couple times a week. Why wouldn't you spend less … I change my background a couple times a week. Why wouldn't you spend less than £2 for a legit Win10 key?


Cos it's not "£2 for a legit Win10 key". To qualify the legitimacy, the buyer has to arrange and pay for delivery of the original busted hardware from an impractical location (no collection available). Failure to pay and arrange collection will not affect functionality; just the legitimacy.
AndyRoyd

Cos it's not "£2 for a legit Win10 key". To qualify the legitimacy, the … Cos it's not "£2 for a legit Win10 key". To qualify the legitimacy, the buyer has to arrange and pay for delivery of the original busted hardware from an impractical location (no collection available). Failure to pay and arrange collection will not affect functionality; just the legitimacy.


Legit as in working win10 key (you obviously knew what I meant by that). So why wouldn't you want to pay less than £2 for a win10 key?
RiverDragon8

Legit as in working win10 key (you obviously knew what I meant by that). … Legit as in working win10 key (you obviously knew what I meant by that). So why wouldn't you want to pay less than £2 for a win10 key?


I imagine most users would want to pay less than £2 for a win10 key. Some users choose not to cos it's not legit if not complying with MS requirements. I think we both appreciate what we both mean, although I suspect you may not realise that my comment is observational and not assertive towards either way of thinking. Some people are OK with the concept; some are not. MS may pull the key if it suspects it's been abused, but the typical (ab)user won't care cos a replacement is only another £2. It's all rather dull, a bit like my early morning.
AndyRoyd

I imagine most users would want to pay less than £2 for a win10 key. Some … I imagine most users would want to pay less than £2 for a win10 key. Some users choose not to cos it's not legit if not complying with MS requirements. I think we both appreciate what we both mean, although I suspect you may not realise that my comment is observational and not assertive towards either way of thinking. Some people are OK with the concept; some are not. MS may pull the key if it suspects it's been abused, but the typical (ab)user won't care cos a replacement is only another £2. It's all rather dull, a bit like my early morning.


No, you buy a key for less than £2 and if it works it works (windows is activated). If it doesn't you message the seller on eBay and ask them for another one (in the unlikely case). So I ask you again why wouldn't you want to pay less than £2 for a legit (working) win10 key?
I would have no problems buying a win10 key for £1.73 off this guy. At the end of the day there's no excuse for you not to be using a legit (working) win10 key when they're so cheap.


Edited by: "RiverDragon8" 3rd Jul 2017
RiverDragon8

No, you buy a key for less than £2 and if it works it works (windows is … No, you buy a key for less than £2 and if it works it works (windows is activated). If it doesn't you message the seller on eBay and ask them for another one (in the unlikely case). So I ask you again why wouldn't you want to pay less than £2 for a legit (working) win10 key?


Probably won't get much response from seller if MS pulls the key anytime beyond 6months after purchase, but hey: it's only £2. Regardless: phrases such as "So I ask you again" hints at where this discussion is heading, which is likely nowhere productive at 1:30 in the morning, so I politely remove myself from it.
AndyRoyd

Probably won't get much response from seller if MS pulls the key anytime … Probably won't get much response from seller if MS pulls the key anytime beyond 6months after purchase, but hey: it's only £2. Regardless: phrases such as "So I ask you again" hints at where this discussion is heading, which is likely nowhere productive at 1 0 in the morning, so I politely remove myself from it.



I'd be interested to see if this actually happens (and if so, on what kind of scale). With previous versions of Windows I can understand it - but with W10, given that anyone could get it with any previous Windows installation (in fact, in many cases MS tried to force you to), and that all activation actually does it allow you access to cosmetic features, it doesn't seem all that logical to police it. I wouldn't want it to be my job to deal with revoking customers' ability to change their wallpaper, or having to deal with irate call-ins about it. But that's neither here nor there, I suppose.
OK. There is some odd advice on this thread.

Having a key that activates your Windows 10 is not the same as owning a legitimate license to actually use the software.

You could be purchasing a license that allows you to use Windows 10 only within an organisation. This organisation might be a charity, or education or might be a big enterprise if someone is stealing/handing out keys. You might also be purchasing what's called an "MSDN" license which allows you to use Windows 10 for test and development purposes.

Now, even if it wasn't properly licensed, unless the key has been disallowed by Microsoft, it will still activate your Windows 10, but it doesn't not mean you have permission to use it. It could be disallowed in future and you may be opening you up to litigation in the future, as it all ties to your email address when activated etc. I can't comment on the likelihood of this.

In the case where they are providing a broken motherboard... this is probably an "OEM" license. This means the license was provided on the grounds that you only use it with the original hardware it was provided with. Because hardware can fail they allow you to replace that original hardware (in this case, the motherboard) and reactivate your Windows 10. I do not know if you need to hold on to the motherboard for the entire time you use the Windows 10 license. I suggest you read the licensing agreement that comes with it before activation.
mrbjolly52 m ago

You can still get it here …You can still get it here FOC:https://www.microsoft.com/en-gb/accessibility/windows10upgrade



Can you elaborate on what would be considered assistive technologies or how windows would check for that? I have used technologies of that nature in the past I believe but I think they were all contained to a mac OS system due to studying at the time requiring it. Also the program/download in that link is an upgrade version of windows, if I am doing a clean install on a new drive (as I am replacing practically all of my hardware that has broken) how would I be able to use the upgrade version?


eviltom2 h, 18 m ago

OK. There is some odd advice on this thread.Having a key that activates …OK. There is some odd advice on this thread.Having a key that activates your Windows 10 is not the same as owning a legitimate license to actually use the software.You could be purchasing a license that allows you to use Windows 10 only within an organisation. This organisation might be a charity, or education or might be a big enterprise if someone is stealing/handing out keys. You might also be purchasing what's called an "MSDN" license which allows you to use Windows 10 for test and development purposes.Now, even if it wasn't properly licensed, unless the key has been disallowed by Microsoft, it will still activate your Windows 10, but it doesn't not mean you have permission to use it. It could be disallowed in future and you may be opening you up to litigation in the future, as it all ties to your email address when activated etc. I can't comment on the likelihood of this.In the case where they are providing a broken motherboard... this is probably an "OEM" license. This means the license was provided on the grounds that you only use it with the original hardware it was provided with. Because hardware can fail they allow you to replace that original hardware (in this case, the motherboard) and reactivate your Windows 10. I do not know if you need to hold on to the motherboard for the entire time you use the Windows 10 license. I suggest you read the licensing agreement that comes with it before activation.




I was considering the OEM option and just hanging onto the motherboard indefinitely a broken mobo wont take up the most space in the world and effectively replace all the hardware it was originally built with


Sorry assumed you were upgrading from Win 7. Ignore my thread.
mrbjolly33 m ago

Sorry assumed you were upgrading from Win 7. Ignore my thread.


I am using 7 right now but made this machine in 2011 and I dont think i've seen the disc or anything it came with since 2012 at best so I don't know how i could get 7 on the new machine legitimately in order to upgrade
RiverDragon8

...If you just want to upgrade an existing machine from win7 to win10 … ...If you just want to upgrade an existing machine from win7 to win10 then use assistive technologies (like someone else has already mentioned).


Yeah, a pair of ready-readers from Poundland to qualify for the Assistive Tech upgrade is 50% cheaper than buying a functional but non-legitimate £2 key.
AndyRoyd

Yeah, a pair of ready-readers from Poundland to qualify for the Assistive … Yeah, a pair of ready-readers from Poundland to qualify for the Assistive Tech upgrade is 50% cheaper than buying a functional but non-legitimate £2 key.


In the last 2-3 years I've refurbished and fixed 8 laptops/desktop PC's. When I needed a win7/10 key I have gone on eBay to buy a legit (working) win key. They've all been fine and working to this present day.

Are you Scottish by any chance?


Edited by: "RiverDragon8" 3rd Jul 2017
RiverDragon8

In the last 2-3 years I've refurbished and fixed 8 laptops/desktop PC's. … In the last 2-3 years I've refurbished and fixed 8 laptops/desktop PC's. When I needed a win7/10 key I have gone on eBay to buy a legit (working) win key. They've all been fine and working to this present day. Are you Scottish by any chance?


Dude, the subject key(s) is(are) only legimate if you have the originating hardware, regardless of functionality or ethnic background. It's only a couple of quid for a functional non-legit key, or a simple click of the mouse to obtain (or blag) the goal via the Assistive Tech route. It shouldn't be a difficult concept to grasp that functionality is different to legitimacy. I have zero interest in what you choose to do or have done with a legit or non-legit key.
Been using Windows keys from ebay for a couple of years now, all seems well. If I needed another I wouldn't hesitate to buy another one from there. Are they legitimate? for less than £5 who cares so long as you get a fully functional OS with regular updates. I also grabbed Office Pro Plus 2016 for less than £3 , again is it legitimate? who cares, it's fully functional and that's all that really matters.
Edited by: "GregoryHouse" 3rd Jul 2017
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