Tips on buying used iPhone

14
Found 9th Dec 2017
Thinking of buying a used iPhone from an online forum, anyone have any tips on what I should check before proceeding with the purchase?

I'll be meeting in person and paying in cash but what checks can I do the phone is legit, won't be blocked, has warranty, etc?

Any useful tips would be appreciated.

PS the seller has good feedback and has been around for quite some time. I'm just a little cautious and wanted advice.

thanks
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14 Comments
Get the imei off them now and check it using checkmend online? Make sure find my iPhone is switched off when you look at it (check he gave you the right imei too).

Still wouldnt stop him reporting it lost for an insurance claim. How much are you paying
Be wary if its a latest model at a bargain price, as previous comment common scam is to report as stolen at a later date..

When you say your meeting the seller, are you going to his house? If he requests to meet in a public place, this would set alarm bells, a genuine seller should have no problem having a buyer come to his house.

Those aside, checks I make on buying a used iPhone are ;

Reset the handset to factory settings - 'settings' > 'general' > 'reset' > 'erase all content and settings', phone should restart and be 'as new'.

Insert your sim card, once network is found, (if you have an Apple ID go through the activation process at this point) send a text to your own number, then call someone, ensure they can hear you and vice versa, enable the speaker whilst in the call, again ensure they can hear you.

Take a bluetooth device with you, speaker/headphones etc, pair them and make sure there working.

WiFi nearby? connect to this and ensure you can go online, quick google search etc.


Checking above has ensured ;

iCloud has been removed

its suitable for your network

bluetooth antennae works

wifi antennae works

mic/speaker works
Original Poster
We haven't arranged a meeting place or time, but I'm expecting to meet him at his house.

The upgrade is still sealed and I'll be testing the handset with my sim whilst there. And breaking the seal myself.

As the handset hasn't been opened I don't need to worry about iCloud settings, etc

I'll ask for a receipt with item, price and date and his address. Anything else?
Stating the obvious perhaps:-
- Confirm his street address
- Confirm his landline phone number
- request a copy of his purchase receipt or proof of purchase or statement confirming he is the legal owner
- In advance of handover write your own receipt to include his full contact details, IMEI, statement that phone is in full working order, amount and form of payment (cash, cheque etc.). Ask him to sign it.

Here's a good site to get information on what private sellers of phones offer and charge.
avforums.com/for…30/

All will be very helpful if things go wrong and if he gives the information freely it's an insurance of the sellers veracity.
ScoobyDoobyDoo13 m ago

We haven't arranged a meeting place or time, but I'm expecting to meet him …We haven't arranged a meeting place or time, but I'm expecting to meet him at his house.The upgrade is still sealed and I'll be testing the handset with my sim whilst there. And breaking the seal myself.As the handset hasn't been opened I don't need to worry about iCloud settings, etcI'll ask for a receipt with item, price and date and his address. Anything else?



Brand new sealed? Your first sentence states your thinking of buying a used iPhone.....?



Only thing to be wary of is, as had been said, the handset gets reported as lost/stolen at a later date, and subsequently blocked, fuiseog has given tips above on how to protect yourself to an extent should this happen, if nothing else having the IMEI details etc on a signed receipt will make the seller think twice IF they were thinking of scamming at a later date..
Edited by: "andynicol" 9th Dec 2017
Original Poster
Yes, used as in not directly from a retailer.

It's an unwanted upgrade and I assumed it was open and tested, but thankfully its still sealed. So effectively its new.

Thanks fuiseog, good advice.
andynicol14 m ago

Brand new sealed? Your first sentence states your thinking of buying a …Brand new sealed? Your first sentence states your thinking of buying a used iPhone.....?Only thing to be wary of is, as had been said, the handset gets reported as lost/stolen at a later date, and subsequently blocked, fuiseog has given tips above on how to protect yourself to an extent should this happen, if nothing else having the IMEI details etc on a signed receipt will make the seller think twice IF they were thinking of scamming at a later date..


Also bear in mind that it may not be a scam that costs you your money. If it's an unwanted upgrade, there must be a contract attached - if the seller stops paying the contract (could be for a perfectly legitimate reason such as losing a job, health problems etc.), you're the one who's going to lose out.

Personally I just wouldn't take the risk.
Edited by: "Muir" 9th Dec 2017
andynicol2 h, 30 m ago

Be wary if its a latest model at a bargain price, as previous comment …Be wary if its a latest model at a bargain price, as previous comment common scam is to report as stolen at a later date..When you say your meeting the seller, are you going to his house? If he requests to meet in a public place, this would set alarm bells, a genuine seller should have no problem having a buyer come to his house.Those aside, checks I make on buying a used iPhone are ;Reset the handset to factory settings - 'settings' > 'general' > 'reset' > 'erase all content and settings', phone should restart and be 'as new'.Insert your sim card, once network is found, (if you have an Apple ID go through the activation process at this point) send a text to your own number, then call someone, ensure they can hear you and vice versa, enable the speaker whilst in the call, again ensure they can hear you.Take a bluetooth device with you, speaker/headphones etc, pair them and make sure there working.WiFi nearby? connect to this and ensure you can go online, quick google search etc.Checking above has ensured ;iCloud has been removedits suitable for your networkbluetooth antennae workswifi antennae worksmic/speaker works


I sold my Apple Watch last year and met with the buyer at the station close to my house as didn't want strangers knowing where I live exactly.
I showed them the item and made sure they knew it was working fine and so on.
Told them any problems they could get in contact with me on FB or by text and I never heard a thing after the sale so all was ok.

Cash on collection means it's sold as seen and no complaints after so it's irrelevant where the meeting takes place.
Do thorough checks while buying and you'll be fine.

Needless to say I didn't scam anyone. It's perfectly normal and a precaution to meet in a public place. You can't trust a stranger after all...

You get the types like those two people in the thread of that woman who sold a pushchair and other stuff the other day.
She got bullied into accepting a return by the two people she sold all that to because they knew where she lived and they threatened her saying they would get their money back...
Edited by: "hearts22" 9th Dec 2017
You do get genuine people selling their upgrades.
But also get people who sell them and then either report them lost/stolen, at which point they get blacklisted. Or just don't pay the bill, so they get blacklisted.

Also, with EE the handset remains their property for the first 6 months of the contract/upgrade...
andynicol3 h, 57 m ago

Brand new sealed? Your first sentence states your thinking of buying a …Brand new sealed? Your first sentence states your thinking of buying a used iPhone.....?Only thing to be wary of is, as had been said, the handset gets reported as lost/stolen at a later date, and subsequently blocked, fuiseog has given tips above on how to protect yourself to an extent should this happen, if nothing else having the IMEI details etc on a signed receipt will make the seller think twice IF they were thinking of scamming at a later date..


Why would it make a difference to a scammer? A written piece of paper and signature is easy to fake. Always buy from a reputable place.
hearts227 h, 33 m ago

I sold my Apple Watch last year and met with the buyer at the station …I sold my Apple Watch last year and met with the buyer at the station close to my house as didn't want strangers knowing where I live exactly. I showed them the item and made sure they knew it was working fine and so on. Told them any problems they could get in contact with me on FB or by text and I never heard a thing after the sale so all was ok. Cash on collection means it's sold as seen and no complaints after so it's irrelevant where the meeting takes place. Do thorough checks while buying and you'll be fine. Needless to say I didn't scam anyone. It's perfectly normal and a precaution to meet in a public place. You can't trust a stranger after all...You get the types like those two people in the thread of that woman who sold a pushchair and other stuff the other day. She got bullied into accepting a return by the two people she sold all that to because they knew where she lived and they threatened her saying they would get their money back...



An Apple Watch can't be reported as lost or stolen at a later date deeming it worthless, as opposed to a new iPhone, so slightly different scenario IMO.

I'd have no problem buying used goods from someone in a public place (with the exception of a brand new sealed iPhone and a vehicle), as a buyer I'd rather visit the sellers home as when I'm selling goods I always invite them to my home, give them the opportunity to inspect, test and ensure the goods are as describes and that they are happy, I only expect the same back as a buyer.
cmdr_elito5 h, 31 m ago

Why would it make a difference to a scammer? A written piece of paper and …Why would it make a difference to a scammer? A written piece of paper and signature is easy to fake. Always buy from a reputable place.



A seasoned scammer wouldn't care a jot, but I said it would make a scammer think twice thats all, may not stop them if they plan on a scam later, but as a buyer you must attempt to protect yourself at every opportunity, especially with an expensive smart phone, which is a common source for scams.
Yes I agree Andy you should protect yourself and most of the time it’s best to just walk away and pay a little more to get it from a reputable place, preferably one that accepts credit cards. Less chance of being scammed and if you are you can get your money back from your card company!
cmdr_elito33 m ago

Yes I agree Andy you should protect yourself and most of the time it’s b …Yes I agree Andy you should protect yourself and most of the time it’s best to just walk away and pay a little more to get it from a reputable place, preferably one that accepts credit cards. Less chance of being scammed and if you are you can get your money back from your card company!



Can't agree more, BUT the OP seems set on buying an upgrade handset from an unknown seller.

Can only advise against the worst and hope all turns out well.
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