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    Trying to start a veggi patch with my children but what can I grow this time of year??

    Ok sounds odd I know but had so many projects on over the summer only just managed to sort the area in my garden for a veggi patch to grow veggis with my kiddies, but Im not sure what I can grow over the winter months can anyone out there help out with some ideas for us Thanks in advance

    22 Comments

    Spuds!

    Kumquats. I do enjoy a good kumquat.

    if you do it indoors on the window sill pretty much anything lol

    Banned

    Tomatoes

    Onions...may a be a bit late though. Go to a garden centre and look at the packets of seeds and it will tell you when to sow and harvest

    Banned

    Tomatoes are too late, it gets too cold at night and not enough sun left to turn them red. Can grow lettuce in heated green house, radish will grow really easy

    Yes, onions - check the variety for autumn sowing ... and radish, I agree. Turnips?
    Indoors - herbs
    Stick in a clump of rhubarb?

    brussel sprout ready for christmas !

    see lee evans on this topic lol

    Banned

    nicki3668;3015927

    brussel sprout ready for christmas !see lee evans on this topic lol



    What grow just one singular sprout ...............bit pointless :roll:

    Foosball Chum;3015932

    What grow just one singular sprout ...............bit pointless :roll:



    might be a bigun! :whistling:

    rhs.org.uk/veg…asp
    have a look on here for some ideas as well

    Winter cabbage can be sown november to march for a spring harvest, as before some varieties of onion, herbs on a window sill are easy enough too.

    Original Poster

    ]Well thats a start for me have checked out the rhs website great info on there Thanks again everyone

    Kim Wilde (the 80s/90s singer) has published a book called "Gardening with Children" .

    It has some good reviews on Amazon. Synopsis below

    Synopsis
    Bursting with ideas for getting -- and keeping -- kids interested in the outdoors, Gardening with Children is a comprehensive guide to making the garden fun and safe. Kim Wilde offers many projects in which children play an active role in gardening, along with insightful tips for making a family garden educational and exciting. With video games often the preferred activity of today's children, Gardening with Children shows parents how to encourage their children to enjoy active, outdoor exercise instead, whilst nurturing a shared family interest. Along with guidelines for safety in the garden are there are ideas for maintaining a child's attention span throughout the sometimes slow gardening process. Children like to feel grown-up and to see the results of their labours: this book shows parents how to help them. Illustrated, step-by-step projects range from creative ways to plant, such as rainbow and sensory gardens, to making scarecrows, wormeries and tile mosaics. For families with a small garden, or none at all, windowboxes and other activities are suggested.
    Indoor projects for rainy days are also included, as well as a plant directory identifying good plants for children, chosen for their speedy growth, smell, cost-effectiveness, ease of handling and other child-friendly characteristics. Kim Wilde, an experienced gardening columnist and devoted mother, is the ideal guide for helping parents bring the joy of gardening to their children. Her year-round, easy-to-follow activities will inspire any family for many years.

    Mushrooms. you can get a kit. you pop them in the cupboard

    Original Poster

    Ok had a great day went over to our local garden center we now have growing in our patch, onions, leeks, spring onions, purple broccoli, califlower, spring cabbage and a lovely Rubhard, my little ones have loved planting them and we are now keeping our fingers crossed that all continues to grow well, Thanks all for you ideas as always very helpfull

    helen_15;3020761

    and a lovely Rubhard,



    a lovely rub hard? oooerr missus:oops:
    Did you have something else on your mind whilst posting?

    Original Poster

    :giggle::giggle::giggle::giggle: Ohps :-D

    helen_15;3021508

    :giggle::giggle: Ohps :-D


    It happens to us all at some point on here! Hope you plan on turning it into a lovely rhubarb crumble!!! (I had to check how to spell it then:oops:).

    Good luck with the veggie plot, we are taking an allotment pot on next year with the kids, no point turning part of the garden into a veggie plot when you can get an allotment plot for a tenner a year and I can keep my tools in my own shed as its literally 50-60 meters away!

    harlzter;3020787

    a lovely rub hard? oooerr missusDid you have something else on your mind … a lovely rub hard? oooerr missusDid you have something else on your mind whilst posting?



    helen_15;3021508

    :giggle::giggle::Ohps :-D



    I hope you're not holding me accountable for this? :whistling:

    Need to only have a couple of sticks the first year and pull, yes, pull them. Lots of crumbles in the following years.

    A whole allotment - lots of work there Harlzter. Lots of people start off with half don't they? You mean metres, unless you've got serious parking probs your way.:whistling: The keeping of tools - I daren't say it.

    chesso;3021570

    I hope you're not holding me accountable for this? :whistling:Need to … I hope you're not holding me accountable for this? :whistling:Need to only have a couple of sticks the first year and pull, yes, pull them. Lots of crumbles in the following years.A whole allotment - lots of work there Harlzter. Lots of people start off with half don't they? You mean metres, unless you've got serious parking probs your way.:whistling: The keeping of tools - I daren't say it.


    No a full plot part of which will be my man shed (hideout) from where the empty plots are I can actually pick up our wireless broadband on the laptop (already checked):p
    So laptop>beer cooler>sorted :w00t: Probably split the plot, work and all costs with my next door neighbour though.

    I may even have a go at sweet peas and take my uncles crown derbyshiretimes.co.uk/pea….jp (too much hard work for me I think though).
    Yes well spotted I did indeed mean metres! Just seeing who was eagle eyed enough to spot it!

    And yes

    harlzter;3021628

    No a full plot part of which will be my man shed (hideout) from where the … No a full plot part of which will be my man shed (hideout) from where the empty plots are I can actually pick up our wireless broadband on the laptop (already checked):pSo laptop>beer cooler>sorted :w00t: Probably split the plot, work and all costs with my next door neighbour though.I may even have a go at sweet peas and take my uncles crown http://www.derbyshiretimes.co.uk/peak/Bryan-is-pick-of-the.4388075.jp (too much hard work for me I think though).Yes well spotted I did indeed mean metres! Just seeing who was eagle eyed enough to spot it!And yes


    So not so much gardening as the whole allotment experience. Gas heater and comfy chair!! That's a big cup for sweet peas; serious business and as you say rather hard work. Might as well do runner beans - easier and you can eat them. You'll have to have some ground rules with your neighbour, things can get quite rough where veggies are concerned.:thumbsup:
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