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    Tv Advice

    Hi guys, I asked a question earlier and due to the responses I'm beginning to doubt my choice. My budget is 900£ and it needs to be a 55 inch tv. I had in mind the KS7000 range but it has now gone up too much for me to afford (900£ has gone up from 600£) I'm looking at a great HDR 4K tv ideally 10 bit. I'm getting confused as all TVs which are not 10 bit in theory should be similar? You can pick up a generic 4K tv now for 300£ so what's the difference between that and a 800£ 4K tv which isn't given the certificate of premium HDR. I appreciate OS and speakers and little things like that can differentiate products but not 500£+ surely? Any advice on a tv would be appreciated. I'm thinking of looking at older year flagship models instead but they're tricky to find. I.e a 55js8000 rather than a 55ks7000. Maybe another flagship model from a different company? Cheers! ( Also how does samsungs KU series compare to LG's 4K sets and hisense etc)

    2 Comments

    HDR is marketing BS. Same with the new PC monitor's coming out now as 4k plus HDR lol. I'm a 3D graphics artist, I use 3D Studio Max and Cinema 4D and I can assure you go with the 4K which gives increased pixel density but forget about HDR. High Dynamic Range is for realtime brightness in backgrounds eg fisheye HDR lenses. Your hardly going to notice differences in gaming. Great for 3d static rendering, crap for gaming or tv and waste of money.

    nutbolt

    HDR is marketing BS. Same with the new PC monitor's coming out now as 4k … HDR is marketing BS. Same with the new PC monitor's coming out now as 4k plus HDR lol. I'm a 3D graphics artist, I use 3D Studio Max and Cinema 4D and I can assure you go with the 4K which gives increased pixel density but forget about HDR. High Dynamic Range is for realtime brightness in backgrounds eg fisheye HDR lenses. Your hardly going to notice differences in gaming. Great for 3d static rendering, crap for gaming or tv and waste of money.



    Uh, it sounds like you're just assuming it's exactly the same thing as cameras do and haven't researched the subject at all. As well as local dimming and higher peak brightness for increased contrast (and a lot of TV buyers would disagree with you about it making a difference), video HDR includes a wider colour gamut and a different gamma function.

    An £800 TV will have a far better general picture quality than a £300 even ignoring HDR. Things like better ability to display individual shades of black, less drop off when viewed at an angle, smoother and crisper motion and a less reflective screen coating.

    10-bit colour depth is just a tiny part of HDR and mostly affects whether you see banding in different colour spaces. Local dimming ability, peak brightness and colour gamut are the major factors that differ between TV's HDR support.


    A 'full' HDR TV, as far as that means anything while peak brightnesses are still rising, is above your budget so you're choosing between different levels of partial HDR support. The KS7000 is notable because it's got higher peak brightness than anything at similar or lower prices - although it's local dimming leaves a lot to be desired.

    Generally below that the only facet of HDR display ability you see is a wider colour gamut. The Samsung KU6400-6670, Philips PUS7101/PUS7181, LG UH850V/UH950V, Sony XD80/XD83/XD85, Panasonic DX700 and Hisense M7000 all support the 90%+ DCI-P3 that's the widest colour space available this year but have little increase in peak brightness and either no local dimming or very limited ability. All are good models that are worth looking at, but if HDR is a big priority then you may want to consider waiting a few years for prices to come down.
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