Unfit, middle aged and needing trainers to run??

36
Found 1st Apr
Can anyone recommend some comfy running shoes? I need to get fit and don't know where to start. Happy to shop anywhere but Sports Direct.
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36 Comments
Try them on.. If they fit and are comfy run in them
Try puma ignite or sketchers, both have comfy spongy memory foam
You need to check in a shop if you overpronate, supinate or have a neutral gait, and then pick the appropriate shoes.
If you pick unsuitable shoes you might suffer annoying injuries etc. and also develop plantar fasciitis (trust me, it ain't fun)... especially as someone not used to running.
go to a proper running shoe shop and get your running action tested to see what type of running shoes you need as there are three different types of running shoes available, depending on your running action.

then search for that type on line with running brands.
Wow great advice thank you.
As said in previous posts get your gait checked before you buy any shoe. Once you know that don't get tempted into buying the latest model of a particular brand as there can be some great deals on olders models. I run in Brooks Ghosts 10 but you either like or hate them, everybody uses a certain brand in which they feel comfortable in!
brooky_agn1 h, 4 m ago

Wow great advice thank you.


One of my sister's has done a triathlon. I was also once talking to her about actually taking up running too at one point as well. The advice below is similar to what she gave me at the time.

You may want to build your fitness levels gently before you move on to running.

To avoid injury and enjoy the experience, it's essential to ease yourself into running slowly and increase your pace and distance gradually over several outings.

When you first start out, try alternating between running and walking during your session.

As time goes on, make the running intervals longer until you no longer feel the need to walk.


I actually in the end took up cycling instead as I find this more stimulating personally. I usually do a circuit of about 30 miles and try to push myself hard though usually mix this with some moderate cycling as well.

Good luck brooky.

nhs.uk/Liv…spx
Start slowly, buy lightweight trainers like Sketchers with memory foam insoles and try walking initially, building up to power walking but be careful of putting too much strain on the knee joints by running literally before you can walk.
Good luck mate x x
Why not Sports Direct? They’re the cheapest place to buy them
You need to go and get your feet profiled and then try on some trainers. You'll proberbly find one brand is best for you because their size suit your feet but when you have your feet profiled they might tell you you need an insert. You can go to your local NHS foot hosp (whatever they call it) they make a foam insert if you need one.
If you have one nearby, try a Parkrun on a Saturday morning. Just wear normal trainers - it's a 5km so it's just a 30-45 minute jog/trot.

If you get into jogging, then get proper trainers from a running shop.
Mechtup1 h, 42 m ago

Why not Sports Direct? They’re the cheapest place to buy them


I don't like the way they treat(ed) their staff.
LemonHead2 h, 41 m ago

One of my sister's has done a triathlon. I was also once talking to her …One of my sister's has done a triathlon. I was also once talking to her about actually taking up running too at one point as well. The advice below is similar to what she gave me at the time.You may want to build your fitness levels gently before you move on to running.To avoid injury and enjoy the experience, it's essential to ease yourself into running slowly and increase your pace and distance gradually over several outings.When you first start out, try alternating between running and walking during your session.As time goes on, make the running intervals longer until you no longer feel the need to walk.I actually in the end took up cycling instead as I find this more stimulating personally. I usually do a circuit of about 30 miles and try to push myself hard though usually mix this with some moderate cycling as well.Good luck brooky.https://www.nhs.uk/Livewell/getting-started-guides/Pages/getting-started-running.aspx


Thank you. I'd love to cycle but I just can't as I have such a bad neck.
brooky_agn5 m ago

I don't like the way they treat(ed) their staff.


Fair enough
brooky_agn10 m ago

Thank you. I'd love to cycle but I just can't as I have such a bad neck.


Yeah, not for everyone. I mentioned it as I prefer it over running. It also motivates me more to get out and about. You could say I'm almost addicted to it.

Good luck with the running brooky.
Just get some asics from sportsshoes.com
MMeldrum10 h, 34 m ago

If you have one nearby, try a Parkrun on a Saturday morning. Just wear …If you have one nearby, try a Parkrun on a Saturday morning. Just wear normal trainers - it's a 5km so it's just a 30-45 minute jog/trot.If you get into jogging, then get proper trainers from a running shop.


I'd second giving parkrun a try , but don't be put off by the name , you can walk it too . Even 30/45 minutes is going to seem like a big ask if you are new to running . With parkrun they have tail walkers so you don't ever come in last , also you can search the results for the last few weeks to see the speeds people have done . I found that particularly comforting before my first one as I saw some people taking close to an hour to get round , so I knew the volunteers wouldn't be waiting just for me . My husband runs it every week , but I've only done a few as I'm more a cyclist , get round in 35 mins but I've yet to say it's fun , still blinking hard work .

i know what you mean about sports direct , but will confess as they had my asics for £23 there I succumbed
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What about starting with swimming? Might be good for your back.
Do a wet foot test runnersworld.com/run…est it'll give you a rough idea of your foot gait. You don't need the latest seasons shoe or the most expensive.

As mentioned above parkruns and great run local (not so many) places to start your running journey.
Join a running group (you don't have to be an elite runner to join one), many running clubs have beginner sections or are affiliated to a run England group which you can find here runtogether.co.uk/gro…ps/.

Enjoy your running, remember a 10 minute mile is just as far as a 6 minute mile.
Some ok advice on here, but none of it really tailored to a true beginner such as yourself. Firstly, you don’t want to go out and buy an expensive pair of running shoes straight out of the gate, you need to get something you are comfortable in so that you can start running/jogging.

You also cant just go and do a Parkrun if you’ve never run before. Sure, you can walk and trot around it and build up to running the full course over time, but that’s only once a week and you need to do a bit more than that to be able to progress enough where you will feel you’re making progress and not getting frustrated that you can’t run the full 5k.

Your best option, to do this right and to be able to enjoy running and not injur yourself, is to get a cheap comfortable pair of shoes and download a couch to 5k app. You’ll be doing three ‘runs’ a week which will slowly build you up to running a full 30 minutes at the end of 9 weeks. Towards the end of the 9 weeks, sign up to Parkrun and male your last run of the couch to 5k your first Parkrun. Depending on how quick you are, you might not be running a full 5k by the end of the program. My first Parkrun took me 36 minutes, so I was probably only covering just over 4km. The most important thing is that you have built up your stamina to be able to keep running for a solid 30 minutes, the distance you cover in that time is not so important.

When trying to build up your distance, the golden rule to avoid injury is to never increase a distance by more than 10% and to keep at that distance for a week or two before increasing by another 10%. This might seem frustrating, but is the best way to increase your strength and stamina properly and not end up straining something and then not being able to run.

Focusing on a goal will help you get better and to enjoy and reward your new found fitness. My first goal was the Parkrun and then I set my sights on a 10k and getting a nice medal. Once at 10k distance, you can start getting a nice collection of medals by signing up to different events that you know you can finish. I’ve completed two 10k races so far (not that I’m racing anyone) and signed up for another one in May and one in June. My goal for October is to complete the Great South Run, which is a ten mile run and will be the furthest distance I’ll have run to date. Maybe next year, I’ll try for a half marathon (I’ll never be able to do a full marathon and I’m fine with that).

I was where you are last January, asking how to start and getting a bit of advice before getting out there. I’ve not set the world alight in the 16 months I’ve been running, but I get better almost every week and have nearly broken another goal of completing the Parkrun in under 30 minutes (plenty of people will point out how slow I must be to still not be able to get around a 5k in that time, but this is my fitness leve and goal and it’s where I am. I’m just not as quick as some and I’m not as slow as others. I don’t care, I couldn’t do any of this last January remember). You might well be quicker than I am, so you’ll set yourself your own goals to beat, but do set yourself goals to make it interested and keep yourself motivated. Don’t compare yourself to others, just do your own thing.

Good luck luck and I really hope this helps and that you manage to get out there and enjoy challenging yourself.
Denziloshamen16 m ago

Some ok advice on here, but none of it really tailored to a true beginner …Some ok advice on here, but none of it really tailored to a true beginner such as yourself. Firstly, you don’t want to go out and buy an expensive pair of running shoes straight out of the gate, you need to get something you are comfortable in so that you can start running/jogging. You also cant just go and do a Parkrun if you’ve never run before. Sure, you can walk and trot around it and build up to running the full course over time, but that’s only once a week and you need to do a bit more than that to be able to progress enough where you will feel you’re making progress and not getting frustrated that you can’t run the full 5k. Your best option, to do this right and to be able to enjoy running and not injur yourself, is to get a cheap comfortable pair of shoes and download a couch to 5k app. You’ll be doing three ‘runs’ a week which will slowly build you up to running a full 30 minutes at the end of 9 weeks. Towards the end of the 9 weeks, sign up to Parkrun and male your last run of the couch to 5k your first Parkrun. Depending on how quick you are, you might not be running a full 5k by the end of the program. My first Parkrun took me 36 minutes, so I was probably only covering just over 4km. The most important thing is that you have built up your stamina to be able to keep running for a solid 30 minutes, the distance you cover in that time is not so important. When trying to build up your distance, the golden rule to avoid injury is to never increase a distance by more than 10% and to keep at that distance for a week or two before increasing by another 10%. This might seem frustrating, but is the best way to increase your strength and stamina properly and not end up straining something and then not being able to run. Focusing on a goal will help you get better and to enjoy and reward your new found fitness. My first goal was the Parkrun and then I set my sights on a 10k and getting a nice medal. Once at 10k distance, you can start getting a nice collection of medals by signing up to different events that you know you can finish. I’ve completed two 10k races so far (not that I’m racing anyone) and signed up for another one in May and one in June. My goal for October is to complete the Great South Run, which is a ten mile run and will be the furthest distance I’ll have run to date. Maybe next year, I’ll try for a half marathon (I’ll never be able to do a full marathon and I’m fine with that). I was where you are last January, asking how to start and getting a bit of advice before getting out there. I’ve not set the world alight in the 16 months I’ve been running, but I get better almost every week and have nearly broken another goal of completing the Parkrun in under 30 minutes (plenty of people will point out how slow I must be to still not be able to get around a 5k in that time, but this is my fitness leve and goal and it’s where I am. I’m just not as quick as some and I’m not as slow as others. I don’t care, I couldn’t do any of this last January remember). You might well be quicker than I am, so you’ll set yourself your own goals to beat, but do set yourself goals to make it interested and keep yourself motivated. Don’t compare yourself to others, just do your own thing. Good luck luck and I really hope this helps and that you manage to get out there and enjoy challenging yourself.


He asked about running shoes to be fair. Not how to start running as a beginner. The advice was about what he asked

He needs to see what gait he has with a gait analysis shops do for free.

You can even tell by looking at the wear on shoes you already use... Wear concentrated on the outside (supination), on the inside (overpronation), even wear (neutral).

For example, I supinate and running in supportive shoes (which sound good, right?) would make the supination worse.
No need to spend big money on his first running shoes but he should have an idea of what kind of running shoes suit his gait. Simply comfortable shoes isn't enough as most trainers/running shoes seem comfortable when you try them on. You can only truly find out what they're like when you actually run in them.

He is a beginner and more likely to suffer injuries and develop annoying problems like plantar fasciitis from using ill-fitting shoes.
Some very good advice on here but something I'd like to add. If as you say you're an unfit and middle aged beginner, get your GP to give you a check up before you try anything too strenuous.
hearts222 h, 10 m ago

He asked about running shoes to be fair. Not how to start running as a …He asked about running shoes to be fair. Not how to start running as a beginner. The advice was about what he asked He needs to see what gait he has with a gait analysis shops do for free. You can even tell by looking at the wear on shoes you already use... Wear concentrated on the outside (supination), on the inside (overpronation), even wear (neutral). For example, I supinate and running in supportive shoes (which sound good, right?) would make the supination worse. No need to spend big money on his first running shoes but he should have an idea of what kind of running shoes suit his gait. Simply comfortable shoes isn't enough as most trainers/running shoes seem comfortable when you try them on. You can only truly find out what they're like when you actually run in them. He is a beginner and more likely to suffer injuries and develop annoying problems like plantar fasciitis from using ill-fitting shoes.


Best to check shops do the analysis for free. Many do, but only if you buy shoes there and then. If you get the analysis done in any of the shops near me and don’t buy shoes, they’ll charge you for it (so people don’t take the mick, get the test and then buy cheaper online).

You’d actually be better off getting an analysis through the nhs if you think you have issues rather than spending lots of money on special shoes that might not even suit (I have a £100 pair of trainers that were sold to me after an analysis. They’re crippling to run in and so I’ve wasted money going the route everyone is suggesting for this chap who is just trying to start out). Following the gait test with the nhs, they identified my issue and provided inserts for shoes. I can now simply buy any pair of neutral running shoes, as long as they’re comfortable, which I just put the inserts in to correct my gait. Not for everyone though, but I’ve had absolutely no issues with the inserts.

You also state state he only asked about shoes, which is true, but it would be irresponsible for any experienced runners not to provide him/her with solid advice that means he/she starts out their running adventure as best prepared as possible. Very few people could get off the settee and do a Parkrun on day one of running, but some might expect to be able to quicker than they maybe should. Early days is much more slow and steady, building strength and stamina, than it is running long and fast.

I am far far from an expert, but I know what I have done this past year to get where I am today and I also know where I went wrong when I first tried this ten years ago without any advice (guess what, I just went out and tried 5km and did my knee in, limped home and did the same thing again when I was feeling a bit better. Goodness knows what the hell I was thinking, but no one was giving me any good advice, I just got told to keep at it not to strip right back to short run/walk sessions). I just try to pass on the advice to absolute beginners as that is what I got this time around and it meant I was able to run 10km ten months after putting trainers on for the first time.

The first few runs are very frustrating. You’ll be walking more than you run (if you follow the couch to 5K). You’ll want to be doing more as you probably won’t feel you’re excercise go enough, but it won’t be long before you run more than you walk and then you’re suddenly running 15 minutes solid, then 20, 25 and finally 30 minutes.

One more thing, if you’re doing this to lose weight, you might be disappointed. You’ll initially lose some as your activity increases (don’t be tempted to reward yourself with an extra snack because you did a run, just stick to what you currently eat). What you will then notice (probably) is that the weight loss tails off, but your shape changes drastically. I’m as heavy as I was when I started a year ago, but my trousers are a size smaller due to the change in body shape.
Denziloshamen1 h, 10 m ago

Best to check shops do the analysis for free. Many do, but only if you buy …Best to check shops do the analysis for free. Many do, but only if you buy shoes there and then. If you get the analysis done in any of the shops near me and don’t buy shoes, they’ll charge you for it (so people don’t take the mick, get the test and then buy cheaper online). You’d actually be better off getting an analysis through the nhs if you think you have issues rather than spending lots of money on special shoes that might not even suit (I have a £100 pair of trainers that were sold to me after an analysis. They’re crippling to run in and so I’ve wasted money going the route everyone is suggesting for this chap who is just trying to start out). Following the gait test with the nhs, they identified my issue and provided inserts for shoes. I can now simply buy any pair of neutral running shoes, as long as they’re comfortable, which I just put the inserts in to correct my gait. Not for everyone though, but I’ve had absolutely no issues with the inserts. You also state state he only asked about shoes, which is true, but it would be irresponsible for any experienced runners not to provide him/her with solid advice that means he/she starts out their running adventure as best prepared as possible. Very few people could get off the settee and do a Parkrun on day one of running, but some might expect to be able to quicker than they maybe should. Early days is much more slow and steady, building strength and stamina, than it is running long and fast. I am far far from an expert, but I know what I have done this past year to get where I am today and I also know where I went wrong when I first tried this ten years ago without any advice (guess what, I just went out and tried 5km and did my knee in, limped home and did the same thing again when I was feeling a bit better. Goodness knows what the hell I was thinking, but no one was giving me any good advice, I just got told to keep at it not to strip right back to short run/walk sessions). I just try to pass on the advice to absolute beginners as that is what I got this time around and it meant I was able to run 10km ten months after putting trainers on for the first time.The first few runs are very frustrating. You’ll be walking more than you run (if you follow the couch to 5K). You’ll want to be doing more as you probably won’t feel you’re excercise go enough, but it won’t be long before you run more than you walk and then you’re suddenly running 15 minutes solid, then 20, 25 and finally 30 minutes. One more thing, if you’re doing this to lose weight, you might be disappointed. You’ll initially lose some as your activity increases (don’t be tempted to reward yourself with an extra snack because you did a run, just stick to what you currently eat). What you will then notice (probably) is that the weight loss tails off, but your shape changes drastically. I’m as heavy as I was when I started a year ago, but my trousers are a size smaller due to the change in body shape.


Your advice was certainly helpful. I didn't say it wasn't. I was just arguing that the advice given by me and others was about answering the specific question OP asked so nothing wrong with it at all.

Well, personally I would use the gait analysis just to know my type of gait and then buy suitable shoes online, where it's a lot cheaper.
You can easily find websites online with trainers for overpronators etc. listed. Don't need to buy the specific, usually expensive ones the shop advises.
You can buy what you want that's suitable, once you know your gait type.

The inserts are a good idea too of course but you'd have to know already you have a problem with your feet causing pain or discomfort when walking. If it's something at the moment not causing pain you won't even think of asking a doctor about it.
I doubt a GP will refer you to a podiatrist just so you can have a free gait analysis if at the moment there is no issue with the feet.
The referral is done only if the issue is causing problems to your health and mobility.
You can always see one privately when you like of course.

OP might have a neutral gait or only slightly over/underpronate. Who knows. These gait anomalies might be a problem only when starting running regularly.
Edited by: "hearts22" 2nd Apr
irrespective of whether the OP is a beginner or a serious runner, it is still advisable to invest in a decent pair of running shoes as it will make the run a lot more comfortable because they are built to give maximum support and protection when your feet lands on the ground.

once the OP has ascertained his running gait, he can buy last season's running shoes from a reputable online shop for £70, including delivery and that is for the top notch running shoes. i am keeping an eye out for my husband at the moment, and he can get the top saucony running shoes (but last season) for £70, including delivery. it is even cheaper if the OP is female as i am also keeping an eye out for running shoes for myself, and i can get a top notch pair online (last season) for £55 delivered.

so we are only talking an extra 30 quid at most to get decent, quality running shoes that not only give you a more comfortable and protected run, but also will last longer as they are better quality shoes than your ordinary dress trainers.

most of the big stores that sell running shoes will give you a gait test for free as there is no obligation to buy. obviously you don't go in and say i would like a gait test but i don't want to buy your shoes! also running shoe size is different to your shoe size, so it is best to get the correct size. you generally need one size bigger than your walking shoes, but it is best to try them on first to feel how comfortable a fit they are.
I recently started jogging/running I went to park run every week An just got better An better I do other classes in the week but I just wear basic trainers An have never had my gait checked couch to 5 k is a good way to start good luck it's very rewarding An great way to de stress
Guys I think I really f*@ked up because I did go to sports direct (because it's all we really have locally). The guy recommended Karrimor Excel 3 which I compared against some Asics. I bought the Karimmor and I have to say they were really soft and comfy. Now I feel like a mug buying their "own brand".

I had some Karrimor walking boots that were garbage so I don't know what I was thinking.

Should I keep them as I find them comfy?

Really appreciate all your advice here.
brooky_agn3 h, 5 m ago

Guys I think I really f*@ked up because I did go to sports direct (because …Guys I think I really f*@ked up because I did go to sports direct (because it's all we really have locally). The guy recommended Karrimor Excel 3 which I compared against some Asics. I bought the Karimmor and I have to say they were really soft and comfy. Now I feel like a mug buying their "own brand".I had some Karrimor walking boots that were garbage so I don't know what I was thinking.Should I keep them as I find them comfy?Really appreciate all your advice here.


not a well known name for running shoes and i couldn't find any reviews from running sites. some waffle from people about karrimor being a cheap brand in general, comfy but doesn't last long as they are made cheaply.

sports direct are really bad with returns, they won't refund and only give credit note even for unopened items. generally shoes aren't refund if you have ran in them at any shop.
Thanks for the reply. I will change them tomorrow as I want them to last. Plenty of others to choose from.
Swapped for Asics Gel Excite 4. Happy now.

I'll take the advice about training and Parkrun. I think there is one nearby to try.
brooky_agn1 h, 37 m ago

Swapped for Asics Gel Excite 4. Happy now.I'll take the advice about …Swapped for Asics Gel Excite 4. Happy now.I'll take the advice about training and Parkrun. I think there is one nearby to try.


seems decent reviews on the asics

runnerclick.com/asi…ew/

I have a pair of asics gel cumulus, which is great for cushioning, and has lasted a decent amount of time. I switched to saucony, which is more expensive but seem better quality and more comfortable. however can't fault asics for value for money.

advice on running for beginners here. well done on your new found energy. keep active, keep happy and live long

runnersworld.com/soc…ers
Thanks Mutley. Just wish I had the motivation to cut down on the beers. Ha.
brooky_agn1 h, 4 m ago

Thanks Mutley. Just wish I had the motivation to cut down on the beers. Ha.


i know i shouldn't be saying this, but that is the side benefit of exercise, you can continue with the beers, my husband with the wine and me with my cakes and biscuits as long as we all keep active and burn off those calories
I like you Mutley!! My friend ran 43km today and finished it with five pints.
brooky_agn7 m ago

I like you Mutley!! My friend ran 43km today and finished it with five …I like you Mutley!! My friend ran 43km today and finished it with five pints.


i saw a bloke stood outside a gym after his work out. as soon as he got out of the gym, he lit up a fag, lol.
i was thinking, how ironic, being so healthy by working out at a gym, then light up with an unhealthy fag immediately afterwards

but hey, we can't always give up our vices, so all we can do is to counteract the bad habits with some good ones. i may not be able to stop eating cakes, but i can certainly keep active and feel less guilty when i am stuffing my face, lol.
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