Upgrading a Corporate PC for Gaming?

22
Found 28th MayEdited by:"qwertychris"
How do all.

I have been given a 2nd hand Lenovo SFF M700 i5 pc with 8gb ram and 256ssd. And I've picked up a 1060 3gb second hand locally in a good deal.

Now I want to end up with a gaming pc for my 10 year old for as little outlay as possible. (Got an old montior and cables lying around, will need to buy keyboard + mouse)

I know I need a bigger case and bigger power supply (current power supply is 210w). Is it just a case of buying these and putting it all together in a standard size case?

Or am I better of flogging what i have and getting a prebuilt system? Or buying a new power supply to fit in case along with a low profile GPU?
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depends on the motherboard. Some SFF builds will use a bespoke board and psu connectors so worth looking at the board to see if it will mount in a normal case and what connections it needs for power as you may need a converter
Providing your motherboard can be removed and fitted into a standard PC case then:

You can buy a budget pc case and even a fairly budget power supply, fit the power supply into the new case and then remove the mother board and components and install them into the new case.

Just remember to take note of the max efficiency on the power supply unit (eg a 550w with 85% max Efficiency will only give you 467w) if you needed 500w then you would need a 650w to get what you need. You can check what you need in the way of power buy adding all your parts to ukpcpartpicker uk.pcpartpicker.com it’ll also help you with compatibility of parts (don’t rely on the prices too much as you can shop around).
would a 1050ti not be suitable and negate the need for a psu upgrade?
Thanks guys. I have a look tomorrow at the serial number an try and find what the motherboard is.

I think even a low profile 1050 will need a new power supply. Will spend some time finding the exact spec now.
qwertychris12 m ago

Thanks guys. I have a look tomorrow at the serial number an try and find …Thanks guys. I have a look tomorrow at the serial number an try and find what the motherboard is.I think even a low profile 1050 will need a new power supply. Will spend some time finding the exact spec now.


1050ti is a 75w card

+ your cpu which i presume will be 65w

ssd - 5w
ram - 5w

150w total (assuming 100% load on both which will never happen outside of synthetic benchmarks)

you'll be fine

edit - the website suggests discrete graphics are available and photos online show a pci-e slot so you should be ok. i think you'll need a low profile card though, or get creative with a pci-e riser
Edited by: "adamspencer95" 28th May
adamspencer9515 m ago

1050ti is a 75w card+ your cpu which i presume will be 65wssd - 5wram - …1050ti is a 75w card+ your cpu which i presume will be 65wssd - 5wram - 5w150w total (assuming 100% load on both which will never happen outside of synthetic benchmarks)you'll be fineedit - the website suggests discrete graphics are available and photos online show a pci-e slot so you should be ok. i think you'll need a low profile card though, or get creative with a pci-e riser


Caveat there is how good the psu is in the small form factor - some of the dell's on here people quote the same whilst they fall into being 63% efficient. The Lenovo though is at least 85 efficient PSU (one model has a 92% efficient variant) so would agree with you on this example.
cmdr_elito1 h, 22 m ago

Providing your motherboard can be removed and fitted into a standard PC …Providing your motherboard can be removed and fitted into a standard PC case then:You can buy a budget pc case and even a fairly budget power supply, fit the power supply into the new case and then remove the mother board and components and install them into the new case.


Believe the mobo is an Asus H110 micro ATX - although there be a chance it is not ATX in its pin out - if OP has a 14 pin connector on your mobo would either need to rewire the psu purchased (not as hard as it sounds) or buy an adapter
adamspencer9518 m ago

1050ti is a 75w card+ your cpu which i presume will be 65wssd - 5wram - …1050ti is a 75w card+ your cpu which i presume will be 65wssd - 5wram - 5w150w total (assuming 100% load on both which will never happen outside of synthetic benchmarks)you'll be fineedit - the website suggests discrete graphics are available and photos online show a pci-e slot so you should be ok. i think you'll need a low profile card though, or get creative with a pci-e riser


Thanks. Yes there is a pci-e slot with a gtx 720 already in there I think. Will for sure need a low profile. On some Google posts it mentioned that the slot was limited to 45w and not suitable for an upgrade, I'll check on Lenovo site tomorrow to get the exact details.
Bertz9928th May

Caveat there is how good the psu is in the small form factor - some of the …Caveat there is how good the psu is in the small form factor - some of the dell's on here people quote the same whilst they fall into being 63% efficient. The Lenovo though is at least 85 efficient PSU (one model has a 92% efficient variant) so would agree with you on this example. Believe the mobo is an Asus H110 micro ATX - although there be a chance it is not ATX in its pin out - if OP has a 14 pin connector on your mobo would either need to rewire the psu purchased (not as hard as it sounds) or buy an adapter


Thanks. I've some more reading to do. Thanks for your help.
Chris be very weary of using that psu that came with that system. No decent 210w psu exists and if it dies it could take other parts with it. Don't be cheap, invest in a decent 500w psu to cover your parts and the new gpu. Decent power supplies are seasonic and evga. My advice is to go on overclock.net and look out for list of recommended psu by shilka, he's great with psu stuff. Even if your system only uses say 300w does that mean you should get a 300w psu. Best to have some headroom.
cmdr_elito15 h, 18 m ago

Just remember to take note of the max efficiency on the power supply unit …Just remember to take note of the max efficiency on the power supply unit (eg a 550w with 85% max Efficiency will only give you 467w) if you needed 500w then you would need a 650w to get what you need.


That's incorrect. PSU ratings are their output - the amount of power they provide to the computer. The efficiency determines how much power they draw from the wall to do that.

So a 200W PSU will always provide a maximum of 200W to the computer* but the 85% efficient one will draw from the wall 118% of the power the computer is using, while a 90% efficient one will pull 111%. So 176W and 166W if the computer is using 150W at that moment.

*Provided it's from a reputable brand, unfortunately some of the cheaper ones on the market uses various ways to claim more like peak power or providing the power at voltages that'll never be used.

150W is about what you'd expect a typical GTX 1060 system to use during gaming, you certainly don't need anything as massive as 500W, although the big old ATX PSUs most tower/enthusiast cases require only start at around 350-400W.


The best way to check motherboard compatibility isn't to look for a model number as it'll almost certainly be Lenovo specific. I would measure the approximate dimensions and see if that matches up with Mini-ITX (17cmx17cm) or sits between there and the maximum size of Micro ATX (24.4cm x 24.4cm). If so then check whether the mounting holes match up.

If it's smaller than Mini-ITX then you're likely out of luck.
Edited by: "EndlessWaves" 29th May
EndlessWaves2 h, 13 m ago

That's incorrect. PSU ratings are their output - the amount of power they …That's incorrect. PSU ratings are their output - the amount of power they provide to the computer. The efficiency determines how much power they draw from the wall to do that.So a 200W PSU will always provide a maximum of 200W to the computer* but the 85% efficient one will draw from the wall 118% of the power the computer is using, while a 90% efficient one will pull 111%. So 176W and 166W if the computer is using 150W at that moment.


He isn't fully incorrect, as you also are not, but there is merit to both sides in drawing the complete picture

What you have provided in your explanation is correct in the power draw. Counter though is what happens to this lose of power and the envelope the PSU is designed to operate within. There is a direct correlation between the PSU operating window and its efficiency mainly due to that heat lose heating the electrolyte of the capacitors (depending on specification their lifespan at max temperature is counted in minutes)

In, what would be considered ancient now, where PSU's were rated at 50% efficient you worked out your peak requirements and then doubled them to ensure you were within that operating window. Have also seen both Liteon and FSP use the same principal in specifying units (not quite as ancient as 50% though) in prepping quotes for a few major brands.

EndlessWaves2 h, 13 m ago

you certainly don't need anything as massive as 500W, although the big old …you certainly don't need anything as massive as 500W, although the big old ATX PSUs most tower/enthusiast cases require only start at around 350-400W.


Completely concur and had same thought ref the 500w above. As above the operating window a psu is designed to work within is key and having a too large psu can mean it is too often sat below the start of where that window is.


EndlessWaves2 h, 13 m ago

I would measure the approximate dimensions and see if that matches up with …I would measure the approximate dimensions and see if that matches up with Mini-ITX (17cmx17cm) or sits between there and the maximum size of Micro ATX (24.4cm x 24.4cm). If so then check whether the mounting holes match up.


That be one way - personally I would look at the forums with people having already done this with this part and see what they state. From that I found someone fitting to a standard case but had a racing cpu fan as he forgot the thermos sensor, or another that was having issues with the front panel pin out (trial and error isn't too difficult there). The one I couldn't see a quick answer too was what the PSU connector pin out was. I know the previous model you needed to modify from 24 to 14 (Lenovo atx adapter will bring up pre made adapter on search).
Edited by: "Bertz99" 29th May
Bertz9929th May

He isn't fully incorrect, as you also are not, but there is merit to both …He isn't fully incorrect, as you also are not, but there is merit to both sides in drawing the complete pictureWhat you have provided in your explanation is correct in the power draw. Counter though is what happens to this lose of power and the envelope the PSU is designed to operate within. There is a direct correlation between the PSU operating window and its efficiency mainly due to that heat lose heating the electrolyte of the capacitors (depending on specification their lifespan at max temperature is counted in minutes)In, what would be considered ancient now, where PSU's were rated at 50% efficient you worked out your peak requirements and then doubled them to ensure you were within that operating window. Have also seen both Liteon and FSP use the same principal in specifying units (not quite as ancient as 50% though) in prepping quotes for a few major brands.Completely concur and had same thought ref the 500w above. As above the operating window a psu is designed to work within is key and having a too large psu can mean it is too often sat below the start of where that window is.That be one way - personally I would look at the forums with people having already done this with this part and see what they state. From that I found someone fitting to a standard case but had a racing cpu fan as he forgot the thermos sensor, or another that was having issues with the front panel pin out (trial and error isn't too difficult there). The one I couldn't see a quick answer too was what the PSU connector pin out was. I know the previous model you needed to modify from 24 to 14 (Lenovo atx adapter will bring up pre made adapter on search).


what a load of rubbish

a psu from a reputable brand will be rated for ABC watts continous power. you can safely run any system which requires less than that power.

i.e. a 300w psu will provide 300w to the system under all conditions (provided it is rated 300w continous, not 300w peak)

efficiency doesnt come in to sizing a psu, apart from, like you say, trying to size it suitably so it's not wasted money. there is no technical problem running a 100w system on a 1600w psu. nor is there a problem running a 150w system on a (seemingly) good quality 210w psu.
Edited by: "adamspencer95" 29th May
adamspencer951 h, 7 m ago

what a load of rubbisha psu from a reputable brand will be rated for ABC …what a load of rubbisha psu from a reputable brand will be rated for ABC watts continous power. you can safely run any system which requires less than that power.i.e. a 300w psu will provide 300w to the system under all conditions (provided it is rated 300w continous, not 300w peak)efficiency doesnt come in to sizing a psu, apart from, like you say, trying to size it suitably so it's not wasted money. there is no technical problem running a 100w system on a 1600w psu. nor is there a problem running a 150w system on a (seemingly) good quality 210w psu.


Few caveats there:
1) Who says this 210W is not its peak rating - most OEM's quote peak in their spec - continuous I think your will find as per its rating at 178watts - hence concurred with you above that with a 6th gen cpu a 1050 might well do albeit not the route I would go or what the OP question was but a viable alternate route. Possibly one of the most contentious issues is the lack of wattage standards in advertising required by the manufacturers

2) who precisely are and aren't reputable manufacturers? we have EVGA quoted above yet I would stick a million miles away from their 400watt model. We have seasonic quoted in the same breath as Shilka who you can find quoting FSP having a better standard in 2016. FSP also have some top rated consumer PSU's. You also have PSU's supplied that become rated then components downgraded on.

3) Efficiency isn't just about wasted money it is where that money goes and unfortunately what that heat does evaporate, or do you think this is also rubbish and that it is not a fact that the most life limiting factor on a psu is a component that is temperature sensitive in its lifespan?

4) rather than reputable I prefer to consider quality PSU's so on failure, as happens albeit more often with PSU's operating outside the operating window they were designed for, there is circuitry in place to contain the failure

5) Rubbish - your example of using a 1600w in 100watt system - it would be unlikely to even hit 70% efficient. PSU are worse at their lower end. Being a 1600watt system though, besides costing too much to buy and paying to run it at its most inefficient be beyond silly its design would be in all likelihood be able to cool that 1/3rd you are choosing to waste inappropriately.
Hi. Some interesting comments. Thanks to all participants.

Here are a couple of snaps of the motherboard. It appears that it was also used in the mini tower variant as well as the SFF.
33878559-3TSms.jpg33878559-Dzthe.jpg
So back to the original plan. Keep the 1060 3gb. Buy a 500w power supply and either use an old medion pc case I have lying around or buy a cheap new one. Along with a Lenovo to ATX 24 pin to 10 pin adapter.

Stop me if you think I've missed something and it's a no go? Ta.
qwertychris9 m ago

Hi. Some interesting comments. Thanks to all participants.Here are a …Hi. Some interesting comments. Thanks to all participants.Here are a couple of snaps of the motherboard. It appears that it was also used in the mini tower variant as well as the SFF.[Image] [Image] So back to the original plan. Keep the 1060 3gb. Buy a 500w power supply and either use an old medion pc case I have lying around or buy a cheap new one. Along with a Lenovo to ATX 24 pin to 10 pin adapter. Stop me if you think I've missed something and it's a no go? Ta.


That shroud around the cpu is to vent out the side of the case isn't? - does the shroud detach or is it part of the fan itself? - if doesn't you might want a cpu fan too - good luck
Bertz9929th May

Few caveats there:1) Who says this 210W is not its peak rating - most …Few caveats there:1) Who says this 210W is not its peak rating - most OEM's quote peak in their spec - continuous I think your will find as per its rating at 178watts - hence concurred with you above that with a 6th gen cpu a 1050 might well do albeit not the route I would go or what the OP question was but a viable alternate route. Possibly one of the most contentious issues is the lack of wattage standards in advertising required by the manufacturers2) who precisely are and aren't reputable manufacturers? we have EVGA quoted above yet I would stick a million miles away from their 400watt model. We have seasonic quoted in the same breath as Shilka who you can find quoting FSP having a better standard in 2016. FSP also have some top rated consumer PSU's. You also have PSU's supplied that become rated then components downgraded on.3) Efficiency isn't just about wasted money it is where that money goes and unfortunately what that heat does evaporate, or do you think this is also rubbish and that it is not a fact that the most life limiting factor on a psu is a component that is temperature sensitive in its lifespan?4) rather than reputable I prefer to consider quality PSU's so on failure, as happens albeit more often with PSU's operating outside the operating window they were designed for, there is circuitry in place to contain the failure5) Rubbish - your example of using a 1600w in 100watt system - it would be unlikely to even hit 70% efficient. PSU are worse at their lower end. Being a 1600watt system though, besides costing too much to buy and paying to run it at its most inefficient be beyond silly its design would be in all likelihood be able to cool that 1/3rd you are choosing to waste inappropriately.


1. where does it say 210w peak anywhere in its specifications?

2. any company who has a retail presence in the UK, USA or EU (i.e. not a china own brand - yes they are all made in china but not all on behalf of a chinese company)

3. what are you on about? psus will ramp up their cooling fan to stay within acceptable limits. when you are talking 1-3% efficiency change between 20% and 80% load it really doesnt matter.

4. it doesnt make sense. do you regularly take psus apart to inspect the circuitry? i didnt think so.

5. there is no technical reason why you cant do it. please read before trying to argue.

does that mean when your computer is idling (say, 40w) every PSU over 400w is terribly inefficient? didnt think so.
Edited by: "adamspencer95" 29th May
Bertz9929th May

That shroud around the cpu is to vent out the side of the case isn't? - …That shroud around the cpu is to vent out the side of the case isn't? - does the shroud detach or is it part of the fan itself? - if doesn't you might want a cpu fan too - good luck


Had a couple of looks. There is no vent in the side of the case at all. Vent is out the back. At first itthe shroud appeared to be part of the fan. But I've now managed to detach it now. Cheers.
Bertz9929th May

3) Efficiency isn't just about wasted money it is where that money goes …3) Efficiency isn't just about wasted money it is where that money goes and unfortunately what that heat does evaporate, or do you think this is also rubbish and that it is not a fact that the most life limiting factor on a psu is a component that is temperature sensitive in its lifespan?


The limiting factor for a lot of PSUs isn't internal components but standards changes.

How much longer can the ATX standard last? It's unnecessarily gigantic in a world where people want small and slim tech and the amount of backwards compatibility it's hindered by is absurd. For example one of the pins on the 24-pin connector is dedicated to supporting ISA cards, and how many decades ago did you last see one of them?

It's no wonder larger system builders have dumped it already. While the component market is slow to follow, it's not a standard I'd be putting any long term faith in.

but back on topic.
@qwertychris That does look like a standard Micro ATX motherboard to me so your plan seems sound.

You may want to add a second memory stick as single channel bandwidth can result in a less smooth gaming experience.
adamspencer9551 m ago

1. where does it say 210w peak anywhere in its specifications?


no - it is you that has stated I am talking rubbish - so where does it state it is not peak which is your assumption. As I stated above I have had dealt with FSP directly and understand their OEM processes in spec'ing PSU's.

Further, in issuing advise I would err on the cautious side rather than where we shout "yee haw" and hope for the best - your approach obviously differs.

adamspencer9551 m ago

2. any company who has a retail presence in the UK, USA or EU (i.e. not a …2. any company who has a retail presence in the UK, USA or EU (i.e. not a china own brand - yes they are all made in china but not all on behalf of a chinese company)


oh dear, that is really your definition of a reputable company - you don't understand industry much and do have quite a lot to learn.

adamspencer9551 m ago

3. what are you on about? psus will ramp up their cooling fan to stay …3. what are you on about? psus will ramp up their cooling fan to stay within acceptable limits. when you are talking 1-3% efficiency change between 20% and 80% load it really doesnt matter.


you will find the lower limit on mean is closer to 30 - high spec consumer products are better - best aren't available to consumers. Fans also have a max rpm and maximum air throughput and cooling effect. That be the design spec of the psu - and once beyond is where you will most commonly have issues.

adamspencer9551 m ago

4. it doesnt make sense. do you regularly take psus apart to inspect the …4. it doesnt make sense. do you regularly take psus apart to inspect the circuitry? i didnt think so.


relevance on why I would take anything apart -? specification is again useful in knowing what you have rather than guessing. You are aware this is a trade built on science don't you (regardless what the ad men/women say)?


adamspencer9551 m ago

5. there is no technical reason why you cant do it. please read before …5. there is no technical reason why you cant do it. please read before trying to argue.


However there are technical reasons why you would choose not to do so.
Edited by: "Bertz99" 29th May
EndlessWaves1 h, 7 m ago

The limiting factor for a lot of PSUs isn't internal components but …The limiting factor for a lot of PSUs isn't internal components but standards changes.How much longer can the ATX standard last? It's unnecessarily gigantic in a world where people want small and slim tech and the amount of backwards compatibility it's hindered by is absurd. For example one of the pins on the 24-pin connector is dedicated to supporting ISA cards, and how many decades ago did you last see one of them?It's no wonder larger system builders have dumped it already. While the component market is slow to follow, it's not a standard I'd be putting any long term faith in.but back on topic.@qwertychris That does look like a standard Micro ATX motherboard to me so your plan seems sound. You may want to add a second memory stick as single channel bandwidth can result in a less smooth gaming experience.



Partially agree - although that same question has been around for decades (who doesn't remember BTX)

Only partially as electrolyte is still the shortest lifespan even solid.

Fully agree - time to leave this back on track for OP though
Edited by: "Bertz99" 29th May
Hi. Back again for some expert advice. As I'm stuck.

Moved the Lenovo motherboard etc to a Kolink Case
Bought a Corsair vs650 power supply and a adapter lead for 24 pin to 10 pin.

All runs fine. Until a plug in the 1060 GPU. As soon as I plug in the power cable 6 pin and switch the power supply on all the fans in the case and the CPU fan run at full speed.

When I turn the pc on. They quieten down and pc runs as normal, tested gpu on doom demo all okay.
However on pc shutdown the PSU won't turn of and the fans all kick in at full speed. The power to the GPU seems to pass to the motherboard? Only way to turn off is at switch on PSU.

I've updated all drivers, bios and I've replaced the PSU. Looked at shutdown settings etc. Only thing I can put this down too is the lenovo motherboard?

I'm almost out of budget can I get a suitable motherboard for around 50 quid. (CPU is i5 6500 3.2ghz with 8gb ram)

Would like to get this working for son's birthday on Thursday so big thanks for any input.

Edit. Ordered this from Amazon to see if that sorted out the issue
uk.pcpartpicker.com/pro…s2h
Edited by: "qwertychris" 9th Jun
qwertychris9th Jun

Hi. Back again for some expert advice. As I'm stuck.Moved the Lenovo …Hi. Back again for some expert advice. As I'm stuck.Moved the Lenovo motherboard etc to a Kolink CaseBought a Corsair vs650 power supply and a adapter lead for 24 pin to 10 pin.All runs fine. Until a plug in the 1060 GPU. As soon as I plug in the power cable 6 pin and switch the power supply on all the fans in the case and the CPU fan run at full speed.When I turn the pc on. They quieten down and pc runs as normal, tested gpu on doom demo all okay.However on pc shutdown the PSU won't turn of and the fans all kick in at full speed. The power to the GPU seems to pass to the motherboard? Only way to turn off is at switch on PSU.I've updated all drivers, bios and I've replaced the PSU. Looked at shutdown settings etc. Only thing I can put this down too is the lenovo motherboard? I'm almost out of budget can I get a suitable motherboard for around 50 quid. (CPU is i5 6500 3.2ghz with 8gb ram)Would like to get this working for son's birthday on Thursday so big thanks for any input.Edit. Ordered this from Amazon to see if that sorted out the issuehttps://uk.pcpartpicker.com/product/8QPzK8/gigabyte-ga-h110m-s2h-micro-atx-lga1151-motherboard-ga-h110m-s2h


Just seen your message

There be a few things posted in the forums - one suggesting after updating the bios as you have and then resetting using the cmos jumper on a few asus boards for something similar to what you describe.

Also which 1060 graphics card you are using, model and details may help someone who has encountered this - although racing fan in the forums was someone missed moving the thermostat from one case to the other.

In your case does it still continue if you hold the power switch for 10 seconds? (just wondering if actually off or another state - which in turn may question if you have pinned out sleep or power switches to your new case)

Third the graphics card you have replaced has a fan connector (red and black cable) going to the front - can't see what/where that is going and connecting to though! BIOS I can see is limited on what it shows on options other than ice - the utilities that come from Lenovo's site though should update windows logs if there is a fan issue it is detecting that may help.
Edited by: "Bertz99" 12th Jun
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