Used Electric Vehicle - what research did you do?

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Posted 9th Oct
What steps did you take to buy a used EV to ensure it was right for you? Were there any home charging grants you were able to avail?
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Although I don't have an EV, make sure to have the battery degradation verified and checked by someone. It's important to know the state of the batteries before you buy as replacing them is incredibly expensive - they make up the overwhelming majority of the cost.
Yes , all about the batteries . Was surprised how cheap used EVs were (seemed ?) a couple of years ago when I was looking for a car .

Basically it seems the batteries will need replacing after 3-4 years max (£5K- £8K ). Don't know if the tech has improved over the last couple of years ? But its certainly something to research .
deleted90213909/10/2019 19:30

Yes , all about the batteries . Was surprised how cheap used EVs were …Yes , all about the batteries . Was surprised how cheap used EVs were (seemed ?) a couple of years ago when I was looking for a car .Basically it seems the batteries will need replacing after 3-4 years max (£5K- £8K ). Don't know if the tech has improved over the last couple of years ? But its certainly something to research .


Those are extreme worst case figures even for early EVs. Those who drive 50,000 miles a year in petrol cars could also need to pay several thousand pounds for a new engine after four years.

I seem to remember the first generation Leaf/Zoe had a 5 year warranty on the battery dropping below 80%.The later ones upped that to 8 years.

It's primarily the battery dropping below the capacity to provide the range you need that is the concern. I haven't heard of total battery failure being a big deal - being made up of lots of little cells any failures should be much more cheaply repairable than general wear.

Heat seems to be the big factor in battery wear. Higher loads, faster charging and hot climates.
deleted90213909/10/2019 19:30

Yes , all about the batteries . Was surprised how cheap used EVs were …Yes , all about the batteries . Was surprised how cheap used EVs were (seemed ?) a couple of years ago when I was looking for a car .Basically it seems the batteries will need replacing after 3-4 years max (£5K- £8K ). Don't know if the tech has improved over the last couple of years ? But its certainly something to research .


but that's been disproven so many times over ..you need to update that tired rhetoric
Mr_Gus09/10/2019 20:10

but that's been disproven so many times over ..you need to update that …but that's been disproven so many times over ..you need to update that tired rhetoric



Not a very helpful reply - I read the reviews all the time as I am interested in my next car being electric . Perhaps you have one and are annoyed by the terrible Part ex , resale value ? Tired rhetoric ? or a fact ?

Take a look at second hand values and if it is "tired rhetoric " no one seems to have informed dealers who make their daily bread from selling these vehicles
deleted90213909/10/2019 19:30

Yes , all about the batteries . Was surprised how cheap used EVs were …Yes , all about the batteries . Was surprised how cheap used EVs were (seemed ?) a couple of years ago when I was looking for a car .Basically it seems the batteries will need replacing after 3-4 years max (£5K- £8K ). Don't know if the tech has improved over the last couple of years ? But its certainly something to research .


Rubbish. I've done 50k miles in a 30kw LEAF in two years and my battery is still over 95% capacity. The bodywork will have rusted away before the battery life becomes a concern.
terriclarkfan09/10/2019 20:45

Rubbish. I've done 50k miles in a 30kw LEAF in two years and my battery is …Rubbish. I've done 50k miles in a 30kw LEAF in two years and my battery is still over 95% capacity. The bodywork will have rusted away before the battery life becomes a concern.



Good to hear - I'm not anti EVs - quite the opposite . I want to buy one ! Unfortunately all reviews I have read so far are not promising . I will continue my research as I would really like one .
deleted90213909/10/2019 20:18

Not a very helpful reply - I read the reviews all the time as I am …Not a very helpful reply - I read the reviews all the time as I am interested in my next car being electric . Perhaps you have one and are annoyed by the terrible Part ex , resale value ? Tired rhetoric ? or a fact ? Take a look at second hand values and if it is "tired rhetoric " no one seems to have informed dealers who make their daily bread from selling these vehicles


You are throwing out tired tainted disprove bs. ..there was mere speculation from idiots as to throwaway batteries after a couple of years by misinformed poor unrealistically skilled fools (+ top gear) ..perpetuated down the pub be with very little fact nor value.

Resale holds good on e.v.

That & the fact that I attend various bca auctions most weeks, I speak to plenty of now better informed dealers & buyers, & am a regular buyer.
Edited by: "Mr_Gus" 10th Oct
OP are you buying it outright?

Are you fine with second hand low mileage?
Do you have spare time?
Can you work out (based on a sliding scale) what car auction fee' on top f the asking price are (hint photo & use as screensaver on your phone).

Join BCA to see what cars are coming up, set alerts, go visit, get a feel, bid. buy, get it delivered.
Lots of motobility auctions with more EV's than just a year ago.
If you have several BCA's withing visiting distance then look at both stock lists & go to both.
Don't take kids.
Familiarise yourself with the rules of auction. charges, removal / delivery etc.. & ask the staff, they are helpful to a tee.
If you start to be seen / aren't shy then after a few visits can often ask a dealer what the anticipated price for a vehicle is according to their trade catalogue.

The bigger the BCA the more likelihood of trade catalogues being dumped after the early morning bidders have checked their stock.

EV stock prices have been a bit confusing for regular dealers who are used to ICE vehicles thus the disparity / uncertainty on price over the past 3 or so years, they have been an unusual commodity in a field of ICE vehicles, bar the top tier brand of tesla till recently when other marques started trickling through.
This year there are a lot more on the market, many are leased so a big increase of throughput, however still small numbers compared to the 1000 or so cars at a typical auction day! (for context).
We're on our second leaf. I usually buy cars used and the leafs have been the best depreciating cars we've had.
I'd been interested in ev for a long time but held off until I thought it worked economically and practically. We had a 7 day test drive from nissan that we used to check that the range was ok for our use. So did all the common journeys that my oh has to do with work.
Decided it would be ok, but the dealer that provided the demo wasn't interested in discounting from full price so ought a used one.
1st one bought for £8900 kept for 3 years/35K miles and sold to a dealer fot £7200 with moderately damage to the front bumper - someone drove into it in a car park. Running costs vs the diesel it replaced saved us £1500/year just in fuel. Si I'll claim to have made a profit.
Current one is a newer 30kwh paid £10k and probably not lost much value despite now being on about 70K miles.

Just do the research. facebook owners groups and speakev forum.
eg early 24kwh leafs (pre 2013) have batteries which aren't as good as the post 2013 models (early ones have pale seats and electric parking brake, later ones have dark seats, foot operated parking brake and eco button on steering wheel). Early 30kwh batteries aren't great - ours is a 66plate and seems to be ok, but several reports of battery problems on earlier models.

Anyone buying an ev can get a grant towards installing a charger. - really it seems to be a case of charger costs being inflatetd to eat the grants.
OP / anyone.

Before getting a charger fitted, find a company that other than the LCD display (often their own design) all the other parts are "diy shed" obtainable & replaceable for ongoing maintainence (basically these are a power extension with its own seperate RCD just like your main fuse board should be these days).

Site all plastic mouldings as far out of sunlight as possible, even if e.v. resistant, consider an UN-tethered unit in case you change vehicle type down the line, (its easier to have the option of a new plug in cable than getting a old / new one changed over.
Seems like the prices have stopped dropping and still the same couple of years ago you could find Nissan leaf around £6-7k and they still that price not dropped much below seems they have increased in price.
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