Using 4K tv as a monitor

9
Posted 27th Jun
I currently have use a 4K Samsung ue43ru7100 as a monitor.I need a screen this size due to the amount of windows/programs I need open for photo editing.Thing is there are a few 43 monitors on the market for around the same price I paid for this tv.The only problem I have is that there is a lot of glare on the screen as in I can see my own reflection in it when I’m sat so close to it.(Don’t know if that’s the right term for it).So it’s hard to look at detailed images if they are too dark.
Is this because I’m using a TV rather than a purpose built monitor?
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Trying fiddling with the tv picture settings. Some picture modes will make blacks darker to give them more effect usually for movies. Look for standard, game mode turns off all processing usually so there is less lag.
Just sounds like the surface of the screen is too reflective?
Meathotukdeals27/06/2020 18:13

Just sounds like the surface of the screen is too reflective?


But do monitors have a less reflective screen?Also when I edit certain images what seems black on the screen those same images on my phone don’t look AS black if you know what I mean
Anti-glare coatings vary between displays. Monitors do tend towards so-called matte coatings that fuzz up reflections. This makes them less noticeable but does reflect more light overall and makes a marginally more washed out image. There are also different qualities of anti-glare coatings, so more expensive screens tend to reflect less light.

Going by rtings review of the RU7100 it looks to be fairly middle of the road, assuming the European version is the same. Reflecting an average amount of light overall and somewhat blurring reflected objects.

It's worth looking through rtings reviews generally to see the range of reflection behaviour available on TVs and monitors:
rtings.com/
scorpio.iscariot27/06/2020 18:20

But do monitors have a less reflective screen?Also when I edit certain …But do monitors have a less reflective screen?Also when I edit certain images what seems black on the screen those same images on my phone don’t look AS black if you know what I mean



Some do some don't just like TV's. The other thing is likely due to different soft/hardware just like a print can look different on screen and on paper. Maybe you can callibrate it with hardware/software if you are serious.
Would you not be better just having two monitors rather than a big screen? My mate uses three monitors.
As for glare my TV had a really good rating for glare when I bought it and checked reviews... theres a site called rtings.com that you could put your current TV model and compare it to something else if that helps?
I use blackout blind as well, dunno if that's an option
move the tv, so its not reflecting so much...

sometimes the answers are glareing back at you..
41227588-muXrb.jpg
This is my setup.The tv is bolted to the wall and I have a 27” either side.The light above the tv is off most of the time and the blinds are blackout
Not really sure you would get the best results using a tv for photo editing? - sounds like you need a good super widescreen monitor that would allow you to have all your palettes (ie photoshop) and full image open at once, or several standard size monitors 2 or 3.
Edited by: "Bluefusion" 27th Jun
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