Using plastic bowls to microwave- safety??

6
Found 16th Apr
I often hear we shouldn't put plastic in the microwave (regardless of whether it's labelled as safe to do so).

What are thoughts, should we avoid it?

How about corning ware, does the same apply to these dishes?

Thanks
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6 Comments
If it's bpa and phthalates free then there no risk to health at all.
Cancer research UK has a nice article about this as well as food standards agency

In summary no evidence that microwaved plastic will leach to food and Couse you harm .... Simply said stop reading tabloids
I don't worry about it too much.

Everything seems to cause cancer now

I use sometimes ceramic bowls or dinner plates directly. Surely that doesn't have cancer risks too
I've been doing it for the last 20 years and I have no health problems...
Edited by: "Bigfootpete" 16th Apr
Have read too many scare stories about microwaving and nowadays wherever possible (time constraint) we do not microwave. On the very occasion that we have to then we always do not use plastic to warm anything up.
sydney8711 h, 2 m ago

Have read too many scare stories about microwaving and nowadays wherever …Have read too many scare stories about microwaving and nowadays wherever possible (time constraint) we do not microwave. On the very occasion that we have to then we always do not use plastic to warm anything up.


So due to time constraints you don't use a microwave ? Isn't that the opposite to what they do?
Also as I have e mentioned earlier, stop reading tabloids your life will be much easier
mattsk3 h, 9 m ago

If it's bpa and phthalates free then there no risk to health at all.Cancer …If it's bpa and phthalates free then there no risk to health at all.Cancer research UK has a nice article about this as well as food standards agency In summary no evidence that microwaved plastic will leach to food and Couse you harm .... Simply said stop reading tabloids


I would always say, use a bit of scepticism when reading papers generally. As Sir David Spiegelhalter from the University of Cambridge, a professor of statistics, and regularly criticizes the price for the way health news is reported puts it:

"There's a whole pipeline, from an original scientific study, that then goes through, it's published in a journal, the press officers then summarise the story and often tend to add exaggerations. They want to get it covered. And so then it goes to the journalist, and my feeling is that the journalists often do quite a good job, but then, the sub-editor sticks a headline on it in order to get the clicks or to get attention, and that's again when serious distortions can occur."

And here's the link to cancer research UK.

cancerresearchuk.org/about-cancer/causes-of-cancer/cancer-controversies/plastic-bottles-and-cling-film
Edited by: "LemonHead" 16th Apr
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